Ashok Malla

Academic title(s): 

Retired, Professor

Contact Information
Email address: 
ashok.malla [at] mcgill.ca
Phone: 
514-761-6131 ext. 6220
Degree(s): 

MBBS, FRCPC, MRCPsych

Areas of expertise: 

first episode psychosis, schizophrenia, early intervention

Biography: 

Dr Ashok Malla is a tenured Professor of Psychiatry at McGill University, with an adjunct appointment in Epidemiology and Biostatistics. He holds a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Early Psychosis and Early Intervention in Youth Mental Health and is a recipient of an honorary doctorate from l’Université de Montréal (2015). He has been a leader in early intervention in psychosis since the mid 1990s, having founded two leading Programs in Montréal and London, Ontario and the Canadian Consortium of Early Intervention Programs for Psychosis. He has led many clinical and service based research projects investigating the neurobiological, psychosocial, and cross-cultural aspects of multidimensional outcomes in early phase of psychotic disorders and early intervention. He has also led two global mental health projects: understanding differences in outcome in first episode psychosis in India and Canada, and application of a low-cost lay health worker model of mental health service delivery in rural parts of armed conflict-ridden Kashmir, India. Since 2014, he has been the nominated principal investigator of a $25M, CIHR funded national research project on transformation of youth mental health services (ACCESS OPEN MINDS Canada). He has published several hundred peer-reviewed articles, held numerous peer-reviewed research grants, supervised many graduate and post-doctoral students, residents and fellows, has been an advisor on program development and research in early intervention in psychotic disorders in several countries. He has worked tirelessly as an advocate for high quality care for the seriously mentally ill, especially at the beginning of their care. He is also the editorial and commentary section editor of Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.

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