Subscribe to the OSS Weekly Newsletter!

Metal in the Micro

Apparently Dr. Oz, or one of his guests, muttered something about using stainless steel containers in the microwave instead of plastic which was claimed to release "toxic chemicals." This caused quite a commotion in chat rooms with some people commenting that only someone with the IQ of plankton would suggest the use of metal in a microwave. I'm not sure how the IQ of Oz's guests compares with that of greenery, but using metal in the micro is far from the stupidest thing ever heard on that show.

Because I take the odd shot at Dr. Oz (he is after all such an inviting target) people send me reports of some of his antics. Apparently he, or one of his guests, muttered something about using stainless steel containers in the microwave instead of plastic which was claimed to release "toxic chemicals." This caused quite a commotion in chat rooms with some people commenting that only someone with the IQ of plankton would suggest the use of metal in a microwave. I'm not sure how the IQ of Oz's guests compares with that of greenery, but using metal in the micro is far from the stupidest thing ever heard on that show.

It is pretty daft, but the oven will not catch fire or blow up as some have claimed. If a smooth metal bowl is used, the only observation will be that the food doesn't warm up. The microwaves will not penetrate the metal; they can, however, induce an electric current in the bowl which is likely to have no consequence unless the metal has jagged edges or points. Then "arcing" can occur and sparks will fly. If there is something combustible in the oven, a fire is possible. The best material for microwaving is glass although polyethylene or polypropylene are fine. These plastics are marked as "microwave safe." Old margarine or yogurt containers are not appropriate. So the metal in the micro is not Oz's greatest folly, if indeed he did suggest that. There are so many other worthy candidates for that honour.

Back to top