Research Highlight

Attenuated backscatter (1/(msr) time-height plot of Doppler lidar moments at the SGP ARM facility by Arunchandra Chandra

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In the Field

From a recent visit to Amundsen in the Canadian Arctic by Olivier Asselin

Research Highlight

The J.S. Marshall Radar Observatory: At McGill University, we own and operate several weather radars and other meteorological sensors. Our large S-band Doppler radar is used for weather surveillance around the Montreal area.

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Research Highlight

True color images from MODIS onboard Terra spanning about 500 km centered at the location of Graciosa Island. (left) A stratocumulus cloud case. (right) a broken cumulus and cumulus with stratocumulus cases by Jasmine Rémillard

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In the Field

From a recent visit to Amundsen in the Canadian Arctic by Olivier Asselin

Research Highlight

The ESA EARTHCARE Explorer Mission features the first spaceborne atmospheric Doppler radar. Researchers from our Department are involved in the development of the algorithms for the Exploitation of the spaceborne Doppler radar observations.

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Research Highlight

Simulated fields of trade-wind convection impinging on an idealized island ridge with a height of 500m. Conditions for these cases are derived from field campaigns (BOMEX and RICO) over the western Atlantic Ocean. By Prof. Daniel Kirshbaum

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Research Highlight

Responses in the zonal-mean zonal winds of the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere to instantaneous doubling of atmospheric CO2. For reference, contours of the control winds are overlaid. The 3 panels represent 3 different experiments. By Dr. Barbara Winter

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Research Highlight

Evaluation of the performance of ground-based microwave radiometer tomographic measurements in retrieving high-resolution 2D fields of atmospheric water vapor. By Véronique Meunier.

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Research Highlight

It is often quoted that every doubling of atmospheric CO2 decreases the outgoing radiation by ~3.7 W m-2. However, this relationship was not fully understood: A few new papers by Huang's group have investigates

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In the Field

From a recent visit to Amundsen in the Canadian Arctic by Olivier Asselin

Research Highlight

Field observations and thermodynamic model predictions show that surface tension lowering by organic matter in liquid-liquid phase-separated aerosol particles can substantially enhance cloud droplet number concentrations.
By Prof. Andreas Zuend
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The multi-corer is an instrument designed to collect sediments in the seafloor. It is equipped with eight arms, each 1m in length, and provides several surface sediment cores in a single deployment of the instrument. 

The picture was taken on the Polarstern research icebreaker during a mission to the Arctic Ocean in September-October 2018. Photo Credit: Charles Brunette, AOS PhD Student.

Seasonal Ice Mass Balance Buoy (SIMB) deployed on landfast sea ice near Nain. The SIMB is equipped with top and bottom acoustic sonars to detect the snow surface and the bottom of the sea ice layer.

This project is a collaboration between the Canadian Ice Service (Adrienne Tivy), McGill University (Bruno Tremblay) and the Nain Research Center (Joey Angnatok). Photo Credit: Charles Brunette, AOS PhD Student.

First climate sentinel installed for our Adaptable Earth Observation System project. It is located at the Gault natural reserve, next to the new building EOS / Gault lab.

This climate sentinel is equipped with solar panels to reduce the amount of electricity used. It is equipped with a very complete sets of sensors and will send the data to our servers located in the Burnside building.

In the Field

From a recent visit on the Polarstern to the Fram Strait by Mathilde Jutras. Photo taken near Greenland.

In the Field

From a recent visit on the Polarstern to the Fram Strait by Mathilde Jutras. Photo taken near Greenland.

In the Field

From a recent visit on the Polarstern to the Fram Strait by Mathilde Jutras. Photo taken near Greenland.

Research

Research at our department is organised into four themes. Our four themes span a broad range of research topics canvassing topics in the study of weather and weather forecasting as well as pressing current environmental and climate issues. Many faculty members work covers more than one theme, encouraging cross-disciplinary collaboration. Click on links provided below to find out more.

Atmospheric Chemistry & Physics

[Source: NOAA GOESEast satellite imagery, August 09, 2018]

This research theme is composed of three research groups/ sub-themes. 

Find out more about this group here.


 

Climate

[Source: National Geographic Documentary 'Extreme Weather']

This research theme is composed of four research groups/ sub-themes. 

Find out more about this group here.


 

Ocean, Ice and Atmosphere Dynamics

This research theme is composed of four research groups/ sub-themes. 

Find out more about this group here.


 

Weather

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