Graduate Students

Caitlin Mazurek

Ph.D. Rehabilitation Science Candidate, McGill University (2022)
M.S. Kinesiology, Point Loma Nazarene University (2017)
B.S. Exercise Science, Saginaw Valley State University (2014)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Skating Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

In Fall 2018, I began doctoral studies in the Ice Hockey Research Group under the supervision of Dr. Shawn Robbins and Dr. David Pearsall. I discovered a passion for biomechanics during my master’s program at Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego, California. Working under Arnel Aguinaldo, I was fortunate to assist with pitching research focusing on segmental energy flow and elbow valgus load with teams such as the Texas Rangers. I also conducted my own master’s research in combat sport biomechanics, evaluating differences in individual cross punch and combination cross punch mechanics. This experience, combined with my lifelong interest in ice hockey ultimately led me to discover the research being done by the IHRG at McGill.


Aaron Manning

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
B.Eng. Engineering Physics (Mechanical Option), Queen’s University (2015)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

I began my Masters degree in September 2018, working with the Ice Hockey Research Group under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. My undergraduate degree was completed at Queen’s University in Engineering Physics (Mechanical Option) in 2015. I have since spent three years working in mechanical engineering for Hatch Ltd. At Hatch, I was involved with the design, construction and implementation of gold mineral processing equipment. I look forward to my time with the IHRG, where I hope to combine my engineering experience with my passion for innovation, sport and performance.


Aimée Quintana

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
B.Sc. Biomedical Engineering, Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education (2017)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

I started my Masters in Kinesiology and Physical Education department under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall in the fall of 2018. I previously completed my bachelor of science degree in Biomedical Engineering at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education in Mexico. I have always considered that the human body is a perfect machine, kinesiology helps to create an improvement in the maintenance of the physiological capacity of the person and prevention of injuries. Considering this, I would like to relate it to sports regarding to skill performance and safety, with the objective of contributing in the development of new technologies or techniques, seeking to gain experience in the biomechanical field by working and learning from a highly qualified team.


Sean Denroche

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2020)
B.Sc. Kinesiology (Honours), University of Waterloo (2018)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Biomechanics

Personal Statement:

I first became interested in biomechanics while working on my Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology at the University of Waterloo. I spent many hours working in the Biomechanics of Human Mobility Lab under the supervision of Dr. Stacey Acker. In my final year of studies, I conducted an honours research project where I assessed the effect of knee savers on quadriceps muscle activity during simulated baseball catcher postures. My experience in biomechanics at the University of Waterloo, in addition to my passion for sports, led me to pursue graduate studies with Dr. David Pearsall and the McGill Ice Hockey Research Group in the fall of 2018.


Michael Solomon

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2019)
B.Sc. Human Kinetics, University of Guelph (2017)

Current Research:

- Ice Hockey Skating

Personal Statement:

I commenced my Masters in the Ice Hockey Research Group under the guidance of Dr. David Pearsall in the fall of 2017. I previously completed my bachelor of science degree in Human Kinetics at the University of Guelph, where I had the opportunity to conduct research in the Spine and Muscle Biomechanics lab with supervision from Dr. Stephen Brown. My passion for sport, driven by many years training and competing at a provincial, national and varsity level in cross country skiing, ultimately spurred my interest in the realm of biomechanics. I look forward to continuing my time in academia with the IHRG here at McGill.




Neil MacInnis

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2019)
B.Sc. Human Kinetics (Honors), St. Francis Xavier University (2016)

Current Research:

- 3D Ice hockey Slap Shot Analysis

Personal Statement:

I began work in biomechanics while taking my Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics at Saint Francis Xavier University. Under the supervision of Dr. Sasho Mackenzie, I completed my honors research evaluating near vs. far target gaze fixation while putting on a slope in golf. I then went on to work under Dr. Mackenzie as a research assistant in the Golf Biomechanics Lab. My positive experience under Dr. Mackenzie led me here to McGill University. I began my graduate studies with the McGill Ice Hockey Research Group in the Fall 2017 under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. I intend to use my knowledge acquired from previous research to investigate the kinematics of a slap shot using 3D motion capture software.


picture of graduate student Brian McPhee

Brian McPhee

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2018)
B.Sc. Biomechanics, University of Calgary (2015)

Current research:

- Ice Hockey Skating

Personal Statement:

In the fall of 2016, I began working on my Masters degree through the Ice Hockey Research Group at McGill, under the Supervision of Dr. David Pearsall. Prior to this I completed my Bachelors of Science in Biomechanics through the University of Calgary, where I gained valuable experience working in the Human Performance Lab under the direction of Dr. Darren Stefanyshyn. Sport specific research relating to the biomechanics of athletic performance has been a growing passion of mine since I started my undergraduate degree, and I look forward to continuing my studies in the IHRG.



picture of graduate student Aiden Hallihan

Aiden Hallihan

M.Sc. Biomechanics Candidate, McGill University (2018)
B.Sc. Kinesiology (Honors), University of New Brunswick (2016)
 

Current research:

- Ice Hockey Skating

Personal Statement:

I began my graduate studies in the McGill Ice Hockey Research Group in Fall 2016 under the supervision of Dr. David Pearsall as a Master’s student. My Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology degree from the University of New Brunswick led me to further pursue my interests in biomechanics at the graduate level. I have always had a strong interest in how sports and biomechanics coincide to alter performance variables in hockey equipment. Ice hockey specific research is something that only seemed natural for me to study as I grew up playing the sport. I intend to investigate the kinematics of ice hockey skates using 3D motion capture software.


picture of PhD student Daniel Aponte

Daniel Aponte

M.Sc. Clinical Exercise Physiology, Concordia University (2013)
B.Sc. Exercise Science, Concordia University (2010)

Current research:

- Hockey Helmet Fit

Personal Statement:

I began work in the field of biomechanics during my masters, when I developed a behavioural paradigm to test the anticipatory postural behaviour in an animal model. Using a custom built force-plate and video analysis, I used classical conditioning to successfully train rodents to associate a stimulus tone to a platform perturbation. I then worked as a research assistant with Dr. Karen Li, and a research coordinator at the Concordia PERFORM Centre. The projects I worked on with Dr. Li focussed primarily on the effects of aging and mild hearing loss have on mobility and cognition.

My doctoral work at the IHRG is in a very different branch of biomechanics: protective equipment. My project will be centered on the question of hockey helmet fit. Using medical imaging (MR and CT), I want to visualize the interface of head and helmet, and analyse how different heads actually fit within a helmet (point-loading, gapping, etc.), in the hopes that maximizing fit leads to improved impact management.