McGill Alert / Alerte de McGill

Updated: Thu, 07/18/2024 - 18:12

Gradual reopening continues on downtown campus. See Campus Public Safety website for details.

La réouverture graduelle du campus du centre-ville se poursuit. Complément d'information : Direction de la protection et de la prévention.

Dr. May Faraj

Academic title(s): 

Professor - Department of Nutrition, University of Montreal

Adjunct Professor - Department of Medicine, Division of Experimental Medicine, McGill University

Dr. May Faraj
Contact Information
Address: 

Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montréal (IRCM)
110 Pine Avenue,
Montreal, Qc, H2W 1R7

Phone: 
(514) 987-5655
Email address: 
may.faraj [at] ircm.qc.ca
Current research: 

Our clinical and fundamental research explore new mechanisms that fuels the risk for cardiometabolic diseases in humans, such as type 2 diabetes and atherosclerosis. More specifically, we investigate the role of atherogenic lipoproteins, dysfunctional adipose tissue and the immune system in this process. Furthermore, we examine the effect of various nutritional interventions as therapeutic tools to reverse early cardiometabolic abnormalities and prevent type 2 diabetes, particularly in subjects with obesity.

Projects: 

Projects are linked to an ongoing clinical trial with omega-3 Targeting Risk Factors for Diabetes in Subjects With Normal Blood Cholesterol Using Omega-3 Fatty Acids - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

My team work together to complete this clinical and basic study, each on a certain aim.

  1. The role of LDL receptors in the activation of white adipose tissue NLRP3 inflammasome in humans; in vivo and ex vivo models
  2. The role of omega-3 intervention targeting risk factors for type 2 diabetes in subjects with high adipose tissue LDLR and CD36; in vivo and ex vivo models
  3. PCSK9 loss of function variants and the risk for type 2 diabetes in humans
Selected publications: 
Research areas: 
Bone/Adipose tissues
Cardiovascular diseases
Endocrinology/ Diabetes
Fundamental Research
Immunology
Muscle
Person-Centred Outcome
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