Courses

All courses cancelled. Please see message here.

May Session:

May 4 to May 29, 2020

(no classes Monday, May 18- Victoria Day)

EPIB 507 Biostatistics for Health Sciences

elham.rahme [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. E. Rahme)

Basic principles of statistical inference applicable to clinical, epidemiologic, and other health research. Topics include: methods of describing data, statistical inference for means, statistical inference for proportions, non-parametric statistics, correlation and introduction to linear regression.

Restriction: Restricted to students registered in Occupational Health, Dentistry, Rehabilitation Sciences, Human Nutrition, Experimental Medicine, Family Medicine, Otolaryngology, Medical Residents, and Clinical Fellows, or permission of the instructor.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor for students not listed in the restrictions above.

NOTES: Medical Residents and Clinical Fellows can register for this course only during the Summer term.

Course not opened to students registered in the Epidemiology, Public Health or Biostatistics programs.

May 4 to May 29 - no classes Monday, May 18 (Victoria Day)
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
14h00 to 17h30
Location TBA
(CRN 693)

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 600-001 Clinical Epidemiology

nitika.pai [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. N. Pai)

The general objective of this 3-credit course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the methods of epidemiology, as applied to clinical research. Issues to be addressed include measurement issues, study design, analysis, and inference in the clinical research setting. Students will have the opportunity to apply these concepts to their own areas of interest.

All students should have a strong clinical background in medicine or an allied health profession. Preference will be given to residents and fellows enrolled in postgraduate medical training programs at McGill University. Previous course work in epidemiology or research experience is not required.

May 4 to May 29 - no classes Monday, May 18 (Victoria Day)
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
09h00 to 12h30
Location TBA
CRN (694)

Course Outline

Academic credits: 3

EPIB-619: Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses

richard.menzies [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. R. Menzies)

Systematic reviews, meta-analyses and individual patient data meta-analyses are critical for evidence-based clinical and public health practice. The widespread and growing application of systematic reviews to synthesize evidence on key research and clinical questions makes it useful for most health professionals to be able to understand and critique this research design, and, to undertake reviews themselves. This course will provide a detailed description of the systematic review process, discuss the strengths and limitations of the method, and provide step-by-step guidance on how to actually perform a systematic review. Specific topics to be covered (and emphasized through numerous examples from the medical literature) include: formulation of the review question, searching of literature, quality assessment of studies, data extraction, meta-analytic methods, and report writing, as well as individual patient data meta-analyses. The course will also cover statistical issues such as selection of a proper statistical model for meta-analysis, including problem sets with practical examples of fixed and random effects models as well as examples of methods to evaluate heterogeneity and publication bias; graphical and tabular templates for the presentation of data from a meta-analysis. Several software packages (such as SAS or STATA) will be discussed, along with tutorials on how to effectively use tools such as PubMed and EndNote for conducting systematic reviews.

Restriction: Registration is open to students in the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health programs, as well as Medical Residents. All other student must obtain permission from the instructor in order to register.

Prerequisites: Introductory level training in epidemiology and biostatistics.

May 4 to May 15
Monday to Friday
13h00 to 16h15
Location: TBA
(CRN 695)

Academic credits: 2

EPIB-645 Confounding in Pharmacoepidemiology: Modern Control Techniques
Substantive Epidemiology 5

robert.platt [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. R. Platt)

This course covers modern methods to control confounding, one of the primary sources of bias in pharmacoepidemiology. Recent years have seen several important developments in methods for confounding control. Most of these methods are based on the propensity score. This course will review the foundations of the propensity score, the high-dimensional propensity score and inverse probability weighting, and the disease risk score. Machine learning methods will be discussed. Worked examples using SAS and R will be discussed.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

May 21 and 22
Wednesday and Thursday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 24
(CRN 696)

Academic Credit: 1

EPIB-654 PE IV: Pharmacoeconomics

jaime.caro [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. J. Caro)

As prices for pharmaceuticals climb ever higher, the formal assessment of what is a reasonable price to pay for a given benefit has gained increasing attention. This course provides a detailed introduction to the key concepts of this field, including those providing the foundation for economic evaluation in Quebec, in Canada, and in various European countries. After defining the basic economic problem, study types (cost-benefit, cost-utility, cost-effectiveness) and corresponding decision rules are examined. An example is constructed in detail to demonstrate how models are developed and a new approach to simulation, known as DICE and developed by the instructor, will be presented. Students are shown how costs and effectiveness are estimated – and how to analyze the model, including how to deal with all levels of uncertainty. The course presents techniques for presentation of results to decision makers in the public and private health care systems, including the efficiency frontier approach.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

May 25 to May 28
Monday to Thursday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 24
(CRN 697)

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-668 Intro to Genetic Epidemiology
(Special Topics 1)

audrey.grant [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Grant)

This course will provide students with an overview of the state of the art in genetic and genomic epidemiology with a focus on important or key concepts, study design and interpretation aspects that are specific to these fields. A condensed treatment of the molecular basis of human genetics and classic approaches including family- and population- based studies will be followed by an in-depth exploration of genomewide association studies, with a view to the critical evaluation of such studies. The use of genetic data and multiple disease phenotypes and quantitative traits integrated with other sources of genomic data will be presented in the context of big data biobank cohorts. Considerations when using genetic data for disease outcome prediction and investigation of causal pathways will be presented. References will be made to the larger context of the explosion of genetic data in the public sphere, including policy and ethics implications.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor for students who are not registered in the Epidemiology or Public Health programs.

May 25 to May 29
Monday to Friday
09h00 to 16h00
Purvis Hall, RM 25
(CRN 725)

Academic Credits: 2

June Session:

June 1 to June 26, 2020

(no classes Wednesday, June 24 - St-Jean-Baptiste)

EPIB 600-002 Clinical Epidemiology

maida.sewitch [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Sewitch)

The general objective of this 3-credit course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the methods of epidemiology, as applied to clinical research. Issues to be addressed include measurement issues, study design, analysis, and inference in the clinical research setting. Students will have the opportunity to apply these concepts to their own areas of interest.

All students should have a strong clinical background in medicine or an allied health profession. Preference will be given to residents and fellows enrolled in postgraduate medical training programs at McGill University. Previous course work in epidemiology or research experience is not required.

June 1 to June 26
Monday/Wednesday/Friday
09h00 to 12h30
Location: TBA
(CRN 698)

Academic credits: 3

EPIB-633 PE I: Introduction to Pharmacoepidemiology

christel.renoux [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Renoux)

This course is designed to introduce concepts and principles of pharmacoepidemiology in the context of drug evaluation and therapeutic decision-making. Topics to be covered include history of pharmacoepidemiology, choice of study design, sources of bias and their prevention and control, the importance of prescribing and drug taking behaviours, sources and use of exposure and outcome data, assessing causality, and measures of association. Examples will be drawn from published pharmacoepidemiologic studies. Participants will have an opportunity to design and critique a study that addresses a current therapeutic controversy.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor

June 1 to June 4
Monday to Thursday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 25
(CRN 699)

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-631 PE II: Intermediate Pharmacoepidemiology

laurent.azoulay [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. L. Azoulay) / kristian.filion [at] mcgill.ca (K. Filion)

The objective of this course is to build on the principles covered in Introduction to Pharmacoepidemiology and provide students with a more advanced understanding of the design and analysis of pharmacoepidemiological studies. This course addresses both methodological and practical issues in pharmacoepidemiology through didactic lectures, group discussions, and the examination of examples from the medical literature. Topics covered include themes related to the exposure time windows, the use of active drug comparators, latency and the application of lag periods, reverse causality, detection bias, methodological considerations in the assessment of acute versus insidious outcomes, new-user designs, healthy-user effects, and non-traditional study designs. In addition, the role of confounding and methods used to minimize its effects, such as propensity scores, are discussed in detail. Other special topics include meta-analyses of pharmacoepidemiologic studies.

Prerequisites: EPIB 633 or Permission of instructor

June 8 to 11
Monday to Thursday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 25
(CRN 700)

Academic Credits: 2

EPIB-661 PE III: Advanced Pharmacoepidemiology

samy.suissa [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Suissa) / antonios.douros [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Douros)

This course is designed to develop skills necessary in the critical appraisal of pharmacoepidemiological studies with a particular focus on advanced methodological issues, study design, analysis and interpretation of results. The course will cover cohort, case-control, nested case-control and within-subject designs, along with various sources of information and selection bias, focussing more specifically on time-risk functions and time-related biases. These issues will be addressed through a review of several published pharmacoepidemiological studies, focussing particularly on studies using computerized health databases.

Prerequisites: EPIb 633, EPIB 631 or Permission of the instructor

June 15 to June 18
Monday to Thursday
09h00 to 17h00
Purvis Hall, RM 24
(CRN 701)

Academic Credits: 2

 

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