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Dr. Shane Sweet

Dr. Shane N. Sweet

Assistant Professor
Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education, McGill University

Research Interests:
Dr. Shane Sweet joined the Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education as an Assistant Professor in August of 2013. His research aims at understanding, changing and promoting physical activity adoption and maintenance in adults with a focus on special populations (i.e., adults with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and spinal cord injury)

Phone: (514) 398-4184 x09903
Fax: 514-398-4186
shane [dot] sweet [at] mcgill [dot] ca (Email)

475 Pine Avenue West
Room 203, Montreal, Quebec
Canada   H2W 1S4

  

Dr. Shane Sweet’s research aims at understanding, changing and promoting physical activity adoption and maintenance in adults with a focus on special populations (i.e., adults with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and spinal cord injury). Specifically, Dr. Sweet’s program of research focuses on three main streams.

  • In the first stream, he tests and integrates prominent theoretical frameworks in the psychology of physical activity domain. His expertise is in Self-Determination Theory and Self-Efficacy Theory and his now also testing the tenets of the Health Action Process Approach.
  • The second stream looks at physical activity behaviour change and associated interventions to facilitate the adoption and maintenance of physical activity. In this stream, Dr. Sweet’s research aims at understanding how physical activity changes over time and what factors can influence the change. His interest also lies in developing and testing interventions to promote and sustain physical activity participation.
  • The final stream is geared towards understanding how to translate and mobilize physical activity research to the public and end users (i.e., knowledge translation). Dr. Sweet works with community-based organizations in all aspects of research, from conceptualization to dissemination.

Recent publications by stream

Theory testing and integration

  1. Sweet, S.N., Fortier, M.S., Strachan, S.M. & Blanchard, C.M. (2012). Testing and integrating self-determination theory and self-efficacy theory in a physical activity context. Canadian Psychology, 53, 319-327.
  2. McEwan, D. & Sweet, S.N. (2012). Needs satisfaction, self-determined motivation and health-enhancing physical activity. Health and Fitness Journal of Canada, 5, 3-17.
  3. Perrier, M.J., Sweet, S.N., Strachan, S.M., & Latimer, A.E. (2012). I act, therefore I am: Athletic identity and the health action process approach predict sport participation among individuals with acquired physical disabilities. Psychology of Sport and Exercise,13, 713-720.

 Physical activity behavior change

  1. Sweet, S.N., Martin Ginis, K.S., Latimer-Cheung, A.E., & the SHAPE-SCI research group. (2012). Examining physical activity trajectories for people with spinal cord injury. Health Psychology, 31, 728-732. doi: 10.1037/a0027795 
  2. Sweet, S.N., Tulloch, H., Fortier, M.S., Pipe, A.L., Reid, R.D. (2011). Patterns of motivation and ongoing exercise activity in cardiac rehabilitation settings. A 24-month exploration from the TEACH study. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 42, 55-63. doi: 10.1007/s12160-011-9264-2

 Knowledge translation

  1. Sweet, S.N., Latimer-Cheung, A.E., Bourne, C., Martin Ginis, K.A. (2013). Assessing the research use and needs of organizations promoting healthy living for adults with disabilities. Translational Behavioral Medicine. Advanced online publication. doi: 10.1007/s13142-013-0231-2