Science Research

Fourteen of the 156 new 2012 Vanier Scholars will be attending McGill University, coming from countries as diverse as Australia, Belgium, Peru and the United States, as well as from Canada.

Published on: 3 Jul 2012

Cachexia, a syndrome characterized by rapid weight loss and muscle deterioration, is a major cause of death among patients suffering from diseases like cancer, AIDS and chronic infection. Now, a newly published study by McGill University researchers shows that a low dose of Pateamine A is effective at preventing cancer-induced muscle wasting, which may lead to cachexia-fighting drugs.

Published on: 12 Jun 2012

Whether it is for research into clean energy sources, the future of wireless communication or a better understanding of the processes involved in language learning, over 160 established McGill researchers and more than 80 graduate students will benefit from support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) over the next five years.

Published on: 6 Jun 2012

Prof. Ehab Abouheif, Dept. of Biology and a research team investigated which genes were being expressed during the development of antennae in male water striders. The antennae are used to grasp the females during mating. They then modified gene expression to see how this would be expressed in antennae development and success in mating. By doing so they were able to watch evolution in action.

Published on: 3 May 2012

McGill University is building on longstanding research collaborations with Brazil by announcing four partnership agreements with Brazilian universities. These agreements are being signed this week by Prof. Heather Munroe-Blum, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of McGill University.

Published on: 27 Apr 2012

The McGill University and Génome Québec Innovation Centre is pleased to announce that they have been awarded funding totalling $7.6 million over a two-year period from Genome Canada’s 2010 Competition. This award, a record for Québec, will fund the operations of the Innovation Centre as well as the services offered to scientific communities in Québec, the rest of Canada and around the world.

Published on: 4 Apr 2012

A current controversy raging in evolutionary biology is about whether adaptation to new environments is the result of many genes, each of relatively small effect, or just a few genes of large effect. A new study published in Molecular Ecology by McGill biologist Andrew Hendry and a colleague from Basel University strongly supports the first “many-small” hypothesis.

Published on: 3 Apr 2012

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