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Dept. of Biology news

Protecting life’s tangled ecological webs

Ecosystems are a complex web of interactions. These ecological networks are being reorganized by extinctions and colonization events caused by human impacts, such as climate change and habitat destruction. In a paper published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution, researchers from McGill University and University of British Columbia have developed a new theory to understand how complex ecological networks will reorganize in the future.

Published on : 09 May 2017

‘Baby talk’ can help songbirds learn their tunes

McGill Newsroom The research has implications for understanding human developmental disorders such as autism Adult songbirds modify their vocalizations when singing to juveniles in the same way that humans alter their speech when talking to babies. The resulting brain activity in young birds could shed light on speech learning and certain developmental disorders in humans, according to a study by McGill University researchers.

Published on : 31 May 2016

New global guidelines for stem cell research

McGill Newsroom Guidance addresses key scientific, ethical, social, and policy challenges raised by new technologies and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application

Published on : 12 May 2016

City birds are smarter than country birds

By Cynthia Lee, McGill Newsroom Life in the city changes cognition, behavior and physiology of birds to their advantage Birds living in urban environments are smarter than birds from rural environments. But, why do city birds have the edge over their country friends? They adapted to their urban environments enabling them to exploit new resources more favorably than their rural counterparts, say a team of all-McGill University researchers.

Published on : 21 Mar 2016

Why do some fish thrive in oil-polluted water?

By Melody Enguix McGill Newsroom When scientists from McGill University learned that some fish were proliferating in rivers and ponds polluted by oil extraction in Southern Trinidad, it caught their attention. They thought they had found a rare example of a species able to adapt to crude oil pollution.

Published on : 26 Jan 2016

Popular antioxidant likely ineffective, study finds

The popular dietary supplement ubiquinone, also known as Coenzyme Q10, is widely believed to function as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage from free radicals. But a new study by scientists at McGill University finds that ubiquinone is not a crucial antioxidant -- and that consuming it is unlikely to provide any benefit.

Published on : 06 Mar 2015

‘Blue-green algae’ proliferating in lakes

The organisms commonly known as blue-green algae have proliferated much more rapidly than other algae in lakes across North America and Europe over the past two centuries – and in many cases the rate of increase has sharply accelerated since the mid-20th century, according to an international team of researchers led by scientists at McGill University.

Published on : 26 Feb 2015

Parasites and the evolution of primate culture

Learning from others and innovation have undoubtedly helped advance civilization. But these behaviours can carry costs as well as benefits. And a new study by an international team of evolutionary biologists sheds light on how one particular cost – increased exposure to parasites – may affect cultural evolution in non-human primates.

Published on : 03 Dec 2014

McGill's Lasko, Meaney among Prix du Québec winners

Two renowned McGill University researchers are among the 14 winners of the 2014 Prix du Québec. Professor Michael Meaney, acclaimed for his achievements in the biology of child development, will be awarded the Wilder-Penfield prize. Professor Paul Lasko, a celebrated developmental biologist, will receive the Armand-Frappier award. The Prix du Québec is considered the most prestigious award attributed by the Government of Québec in cultural and scientific fields.

Published on : 04 Nov 2014

Old gastrointestinal drug slows aging, McGill researchers say

Clioquinol inhibits action of the CLK1 aging gene, may alleviate Alzheimer’s.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 07 Jan 2009

Indigenous community in Panama to see carbon payments from forest conservation

The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), the Panama-based branch of the Smithsonian Institution, will offset its carbon dioxide emissions by working with an indigenous community to conserve forests and reforest degraded lands with native tree species. The agreement was announced Sunday.

Classified as : Staff, Faculty, External, Students
Published on : 21 Aug 2008