Faculty of Science

Vani Hari, who goes by the alias “The Food Babe” has become a real social phenomenon. She blogs, appears on TV and has just come out with a book that quickly made it to the New York Times best seller list. She has lots of followers and lots of critics, including myself. I don’t disagree with her goal of improving people’s eating habits. I just disagree with the methods used. Irrational fear-mongering is not the way to go. "There is just no acceptable level of any chemical to ingest, ever," she says.

Classified as: OSS, Faculty of Science, Office for Science and Society
Published on: 15 Mar 2015

Professor Catherine Potvin, a Canada Research Chair in Climate Change Mitigation and Tropical Forests, has convened colleagues from 30 Canadian universities to join her in a collective initiative called Sustainable Canada Dialogues. The resulting group, that mobilizes over 60 researchers from every province, has built a consensus around a plan of sustainability solutions to help Canada successfully achieve transition to a low-carbon society. Potvin spoke with the McGill Reporter about what government officials and ordinary citizens can do to mitigate climate change.

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Published on: 12 Mar 2015

The popular dietary supplement ubiquinone, also known as Coenzyme Q10, is widely believed to function as an antioxidant, protecting cells against damage from free radicals. But a new study by scientists at McGill University finds that ubiquinone is not a crucial antioxidant -- and that consuming it is unlikely to provide any benefit.

Classified as: Biology, Research, mitochondria, food, aging, nutrition, McGill News, antioxidant, Coenzyme Q10, dietary supplement, Hekimi, Nature Communications, ubiquinone, free radicals
Published on: 6 Mar 2015

The organisms commonly known as blue-green algae have proliferated much more rapidly than other algae in lakes across North America and Europe over the past two centuries – and in many cases the rate of increase has sharply accelerated since the mid-20th century, according to an international team of researchers led by scientists at McGill University.

Classified as: environment, ecology, Research, water, climate change, toxins, McGill News, blue-green algae, cyanobacteria, lakes
Published on: 26 Feb 2015

Researchers at McGill University have developed a new, low-cost method to build DNA nanotubes block by block – a breakthrough that could help pave the way for scaffolds made from DNA strands to be used in applications such as optical and electronic devices or smart drug-delivery systems.

Classified as: Nanotechnology, Research, DNA, chemistry, McGill News, Amani Hariri, DNA structures, fluorescence microscope, Gonzalo Cosa, Hanadi Sleiman, nanotubes, single-molecule microscopy
Published on: 23 Feb 2015

Mathematica, from Wolfram Research, is a powerful computational software used for mathematical modeling and data visualization.  McGill IT Services has been providing Mathematica to faculty and staff, and in computer labs across the University for the past few years.  Now it is also available to students via the McGill Software site (www.mcgill.ca/software).

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Published on: 9 Feb 2015

Mathematica, from Wolfram Research, is a powerful computational software used for mathematical modeling and data visualization.  McGill IT Services has been providing Mathematica to Faculty & Staff, and in computer labs across the University for the past few years.  Now it is also available to students via the McGill Software site (www.mcgill.ca/software).

Classified as: Mathematica, Software, Wolfram
Published on: 9 Feb 2015

Magicians have astonished audiences for centuries by subtly, yet powerfully, influencing their decisions. But there has been little systematic study of the psychological factors that make magic tricks work.

Classified as: Research, psychology, McGill News, Jay Olson, cognition, consciousness, magic, Raz
Published on: 9 Feb 2015

The Great Lakes have been invaded by more non-native species than any other freshwater ecosystem in the world. In spite of increasing efforts to stem the tide of invasion threats, the lakes remain vulnerable, according to scientists from McGill University and colleagues in Canada and the United States. 

Classified as: environment, Research, invasive species, Anthony Ricciardi, Faculty of Science, great lakes, McGill News, policies
Published on: 29 Jan 2015

McGill faculty and staff members now have FREE access to Office 365 ProPlus on personal devices, including computers (PCs and Macs),  tablets (iPad and Windows), and smartphones (iPhone, Android, and Windows). This includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other Office apps. For faculty and staff, this service replaces the Office portion of the Microsoft Work at Home program. Students already (and still!) have free access to Office 365 ProPlus.

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Published on: 23 Jan 2015

Current government-mandated nutrition labeling is ineffective in improving nutrition, but there is a better system available, according to a study by McGill University researchers published in the December issue of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.

Classified as: Research, obesity, nutrition, nutrition labels
Published on: 20 Jan 2015

McGill faculty and staff members now have FREE access to Office 365 ProPlus, which includes the latest versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint and other Office apps.

The service allows you to install the Office suite on up to 5 personal devices*, including PCs, Macs, and 5 iPad and Windows tablets. You can also use the Office Mobile apps on iPhone, Android  and Windows smartphones.

For information on what's included and other FAQs visit Office 365 ProPlus

Classified as: Microsoft, campus software, Office 365
Published on: 19 Jan 2015

During the 20th century, urban transportation planning in North America was mainly concerned with easing traffic congestion, improving safety and saving time for motorists. These days, most cities’ transportation plans evoke a more complex blend of environmental, economic, and social-equity goals – all aimed at promoting “sustainability.” Yet, many fail to include meaningful measurements of social-equity objectives, such as helping disadvantaged neighborhoods access essential services, according to researchers at McGill University.

Classified as: transportation, infrastructure, news, Research, Traffic, social equity, planning, Badami, El-Geneidy, Manaugh, Transport Policy
Published on: 7 Jan 2015

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