Interfaculty Program Environment (54 credits)

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Offered by: McGill School of Environment     Degree: Bachelor of Arts and Science

Program Requirements

The growth of technology, globalization of economies, and rapid increases in population and per capita consumption have all had dramatic environmental impacts. The Interfaculty Program Environment for the Bachelor of Arts and Science is designed to provide students with a broad "Liberal Arts/Science" training. In combination with careful mentoring, this program offers a great degree of flexibility, allowing students to develop the skills and knowledge base required to face the myriad of environmental problems that currently need to be addressed.

Program Requirements

1. Students are required to take a maximum of 21 credits at the 200 level and a minimum of 12 credits at the 400 level or higher in this program. This includes required courses.

2. Students must complete at least 21 credits in the Faculty of Arts and at least 21 in the Faculty of Science as part of their interfaculty program and their minor or minor concentration. ENVR courses are considered courses in both Arts and Science, and so the credits are split between the two faculties for the purpose of this regulation.

Location Note: When planning your schedule and registering for courses, you should verify where each course is offered because courses for this program are taught on both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue.

Required Courses (18 credits)

Location Note: Core required courses are taught at both McGill's Downtown campus and at the Macdonald campus in Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue. You should register in Section 001 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Downtown campus, and in Section 051 of an ENVR course that you plan to take on the Macdonald campus.

  • ENVR 200 The Global Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : A systems approach to study the different components of the environment involved in global climate change: the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. The interactions among these components. Their role in global climate change. The human dimension to global change.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Anthony Ricciardi, Eyad Hashem Atallah, Frederic Fabry, George McCourt, James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 201 Society, Environment and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course deals with how scientific-technological, socio-economic, political-institutional and behavioural factors mediate society-environment interactions. Issues discussed include population and resources; consumption, impacts and institutions; integrating environmental values in societal decision-making; and the challenges associated with, and strategies for, promoting sustainability. Case studies in various sectors and contexts are used.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Kevin Manaugh, Madhav Govind Badami, Jeffrey Cardille, Geoffrey Garver (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 202 The Evolving Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Formation of the Earth and the evolution of life. How geological and biological change are the consequence of history, chance, and necessity acting over different scales of space and time. General principles governing the formation of modern landscapes and biotas. Effects of human activities on natural systems.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: George McCourt, Sylvie de Blois, Katherine Pagnucco, Colin Austin Chapman, Jeanne Paquette, Christie-Anna Lovat (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 203 Knowledge, Ethics and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Introduction to cultural perspectives on the environment: the influence of culture and cognition on perceptions of the natural world; conflicts in orders of knowledge (models, taxonomies, paradigms, theories, cosmologies), ethics (moral values, frameworks, dilemmas), and law (formal and customary, rights and obligations) regarding political dimensions of critical environments, resource use, and technologies.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Julia Freeman (Fall) Iwao Hirose, Ismael Vaccaro (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

  • ENVR 301 Environmental Research Design (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Techniques used in design and completion of environmental research projects. Problem definition, data sources and use of appropriate strategies and methodologies. Principles underlying research design are emphasized, including critical thinking, recognizing causal relationships, ideologies and bias in research, and when and where to seek expertise.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro, Raja Sengupta (Fall) Jeffrey Cardille, Julia Freeman (Winter)

    • Fall-Downtown Campus: Section 001

    • Winter-Downtown Campus: Section 001; Macdonald Campus: Section 051

    • Restrictions: Restricted to U2 or higher

  • ENVR 400 Environmental Thought (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in interdisciplinary seminar groups on challenging philosophical, ethical, scientific and practical issues. They will explore cutting-edge ideas and grapple with the reconciliation of environmental imperatives and social, political and economic pragmatics. Activities include meeting practitioners, attending guest lectures, following directed readings, and organizing, leading and participating in seminars.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Julia Freeman, Hamish van der Ven (Fall) Gregory Matthew Mikkelson, Shaun MacDonald Lovejoy, Darin Barney (Winter)

    • Fall - Macdonald Campus; Winter - Downtown

    • Section 001: Downtown Campus

    • Section 051: Macdonald Campus

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 203

    • Restriction: Open only to U3 students, or permission of instructor

Complementary Courses (36 credits)

36 credits of complementary courses are selected as follows:

3 credits - Senior Research Project
3 credits - Statistics
30 credits - chosen from amongst 12 Areas of focus

Senior Research Project

Only 3 credits will be applied to the program; extra credits will count as electives.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.

  • ENVR 401 Environmental Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Students work in an interdisciplinary team on a real-world research project involving problem definition, methodology development, social, ethical and environmental impact assessment, execution of the study, and dissemination of results to the research community and to the people affected. Teams begin defining their projects during the preceding spring.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: George McCourt, Renee Sieber, Madhav Govind Badami, Frederic Fabry, Raja Sengupta, Brian Leung (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: ENVR 301

    • Restriction: B.A. Faculty Program in Environment, B.A.&Sc. Faculty Program in Environment , B.Sc.(Ag.Env.Sc.) and B.Sc. Major in Environment, and Diploma in Environment.

  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Statistics:

One of:

  • AEMA 310 Statistical Methods 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Mathematics (Agric&Envir Sci) : Measures of central tendency and dispersion; binomial and Poisson distributions; normal, chi-square, Student's t and Fisher-Snedecor F distributions; estimation and hypothesis testing; simple linear regression and correlation; analysis of variance for simple experimental designs.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Pierre R L Dutilleul (Fall) Pierre R L Dutilleul, Valérie Gravel (Winter)

    • Two 1.5-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab

    • Please note that credit will be given for only one introductory statistics course. Consult your academic advisor.

  • BIOL 373 Biometry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Elementary statistical methods in biology. Introduction to the analysis of biological data with emphasis on the assumptions behind statistical tests and models. Use of statistical techniques typically available on computer packages.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Brian Leung (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: MATH 112 or equivalent

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • GEOG 202 Statistics and Spatial Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Exploratory data analysis, univariate descriptive and inferential statistics, non-parametric statistics, correlation and simple regression. Problems associated with analysing spatial data such as the 'modifiable areal unit problem' and spatial autocorrelation. Statistics measuring spatial pattern in point, line and polygon data.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Camille Ouellet Dallaire (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2.5 hours and lab

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

  • MATH 203 Principles of Statistics 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Mathematics and Statistics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Mathematics & Statistics (Sci) : Examples of statistical data and the use of graphical means to summarize the data. Basic distributions arising in the natural and behavioural sciences. The logical meaning of a test of significance and a confidence interval. Tests of significance and confidence intervals in the one and two sample setting (means, variances and proportions).

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Abbas Khalili Mahmoudabadi, David B Wolfson (Fall) Jose Andres Correa (Winter) Jose Andres Correa (Summer)

    • No calculus prerequisites

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students in all disciplines. For extensive course restrictions covering statistics courses see Section 3.6.1 of the Arts and of the Science sections of the calendar regarding course overlaps.

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar. Students should consult http://www.mcgill.ca/students/transfercredit for information regarding transfer credits for this course.

  • PSYC 204 Introduction to Psychological Statistics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Psychology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Psychology : The statistical analysis of research data; frequency distributions; graphic representation; measures of central tendency and variability; elementary sampling theory and tests of significance.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Rhonda N Amsel (Fall) Mohammad Darainy (Winter) Gentiana Sadikaj (Summer)

    • Fall and Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have passed a CEGEP statistics course(s) with a minimum grade of 75%: Mathematics 201-307 or 201-337 or equivalent or the combination of Quantitative Methods 300 with Mathematics 300

    • This course is a prerequisite for PSYC 305, PSYC 406, PSYC 310, PSYC 336

    • You may not be able to receive credit for this course and other statistic courses. Be sure to check the Course Overlap section under Faculty Degree Requirements in the Arts or Science section of the Calendar.

Areas:

30 credits from at least three of the following Areas. At least 6 credits must be at the 400 level or higher, selected either from these lists or in consultation with the Program Adviser.

Area 1: Population, Community, and Ecosystem Ecology

* Note: You may take BIOL 540 or ENVR 540, but not both; you may take BIOL 308 or ENVB 305, but not both.

  • BIOL 308 Ecological Dynamics (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of population, community, and ecosystem dynamics: population growth and regulation, species interactions, dynamics of competitive interactions and of predator/prey systems; evolutionary dynamics.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Frederic Guichard (Fall)

  • BIOL 432 Limnology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : A study of the physical, chemical and biological properties of lakes and other inland waters, with emphasis on their functioning as systems.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Irene Gregory-Eaves, Gregor Fussmann (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture; 2 weekends at field station equivalent to 3 hours laboratory per week

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.

    • This course, involving two field weekends, has an additional fee of $312.72, which includes room and board and transportation. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking ENVB 315.

  • BIOL 441 Biological Oceanography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : An introduction to how the ocean functions biologically: biology and ecology of marine plankton; regulation, extent and fate of production in the sea.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Neil Price (Winter)

  • BIOL 540 Ecology of Species Invasions (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Causes and consequences of biological invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with invasive species.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Anthony Ricciardi (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to U1 or U2 students

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken ENVR 540.

  • ENVB 305 Population & Community Ecology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Interactions between organisms and their environment; historical and current perspectives in applied and theoretical population and community ecology. Principles of population dynamics, feedback loops, and population regulation. Development and structure of communities; competition, predation and food web dynamics. Biodiversity science in theory and practice.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Shaun Turney (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 205

  • ENVB 410 Ecosystem Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Biotic and abiotic processes that control the flows of energy, nutrients and water through ecosystems; emergent system properties; approaches to analyzing complex systems. Labs include collection and multivariate analysis of field data.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: James W Fyles (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: ENVB 222, AEMA 310 or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WOOD 410

    • This course has an additional charge of $16.54 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • ENVB 500 Advanced Topics in Ecotoxicology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Exploring the impact of environmental chemicals on biological organisms in an ecological context. Basic topics in ecotoxicology, such as source and fate, routes of exposure, bioavailability, dose-response, biomarkers, and risk assessment will be covered from both theoretical and applied perspectives. The processes by which pollutants are tested, regulated, and monitored will be critically examined.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Jessica Head (Fall)

  • ENVR 540 Ecology of Species Invasions (3 credits) *

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Causes and consequences of biological invasion, as well as risk assessment methods and management strategies for dealing with invasive species.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Anthony Ricciardi (Winter)

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 308 or permission of instructor.

    • Restrictions: Not open to U1 or U2 students. Not open to students who are taking or have taken BIOL 540.

  • GEOG 350 Ecological Biogeography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The study of the patterns of distribution of organisms in space and time with emphasis on plant communities. Ecological, geographical, historical and anthropological factors affecting these distribution patterns will be discussed. Particular consideration is given to methods for description and classification of plant communities.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • PLNT 460 Plant Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Theory and practice of plant ecology with an emphasis on the interaction between patterns and ecological processes and the dynamics, conservation and management of plant populations and communities over a range of temporal and spatial scales.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Yves Claveau (Fall)

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite: AEMA 310 or permission of instructor.

    • This course carries an additional charge of $27.33 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

Area 2: Biodiversity and Conservation

  • BIOL 305 Animal Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : The characteristics of the major groups of animals, their ancestry, history and relationship to one another. The processes of speciation, adaptive radiation and extinction responsible for diversity. Methods for constructing of phylogenies, for comparing phenotypes, and for estimating and analyzing diversity.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Rowan Barrett, Hans Carl Larsson, David M Green, Anthony Ricciardi, Andrew Hendry, Graham Bell, Virginie Millien (Winter)

  • BIOL 355 Trees: Ecology & Evolution (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Functional ecology and evolution of trees: patterns in the diversity of tree form and function, the nature of tree adaptation to environment from the scale of habitat to global biogeography.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 205 and BIOL 215 or permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 555.

  • BIOL 427 Herpetology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Principles of biology as exemplified by amphibians and reptiles. Topics include: adaptation, social behaviour, reproductive strategies, physiology, biomechanics, ecology, biogeography and evolution. Laboratories will emphasize structure, systematics and identification of local and world herpetofauna as well as field methods.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • ***BIOL 427 had to be cancelled this term due to a lack of lab space; it will be offered in the Fall of 2018.

    • Fall

    • 2 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 205 and BIOL 305 or permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken BIOL 327.

  • BIOL 465 Conservation Biology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Discussion of relevant theoretical and applied issues in conservation biology. Topics: biodiversity, population viability analysis, community dynamics, biology of rarity, extinction, habitat fragmentation, social issues.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: David M Green, Heather Gray, James Barnett (Fall)

  • ENTO 440 Insect Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Entomology : Ecology, evolution and systematics of insects and their relatives. Classification and phylogeny of selected insect families; use of diagnostic characters and taxonomic keys. Ecological interactions at an individual, population and community level with emphasis on diversity patterns in space and time.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Combined lecture/demonstration

    • Prerequisite: ENTO 330 or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ENTO 425

  • MICR 331 Microbial Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Microbiology (Agric&Envir Sc) : The ecology of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and archaea, and their roles in biogeochemical cycles will be discussed. Microbial interactions with the environment, plants, animals and other microbes emphasizing the underlying genetics and physiology. Diversity, evolution (microbial phylogenetics) and the application of molecular biology in microbial ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Brian T Driscoll (Winter)

  • PLNT 358 Flowering Plant Diversity (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Plant Science : Principles of classification and identification of flowering plants and ferns, with emphasis on 35 major families of flowering plants and the habitats in which they grow.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Frieda Beauregard (Fall)

    • 2 lectures, one 3-hour lab, plus a 4-day field week held the week preceding the start of classes

    • Prerequisite: PLNT 201 or AEBI 210 or ENVR 202 or permission of instructor

    • A $54.66 fee is charged to all students registered in this course, which has a fieldwork component prior to the beginning of classes in August. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions, a hand lens, instructional handouts and identification aids. Students who have already received a hand lens may request a reimbursement of a portion of this charge through their department.

  • WILD 307 Natural History of Vertebrates (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : The diversity and natural history of Canadian vertebrates illustrated with trophic, phylogenetic, and macroecological approaches.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Murray Mitchell Humphries (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Lectures and modules

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ZOOL 307

    • This course carries an additional charge of $16.54 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • WILD 350 Mammalogy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : This course focuses on the evolution, classification, ecology and behaviour of mammals and relations between humans and mammals. Also structure, systematics and identification of local and world mammals, as well as field methods will be emphasized.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Murray Mitchell Humphries (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisites: AEBI 211 or WILD 200 (formerly AEBI 200), and WILD 307 (formerly ZOOL 307)

    • A fee of $15.78 is charged to all students registered in WILD 350, Mammalogy, a course that has a required field trip. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions and equipment associated with local field trips. The fee is only refundable prior to the deadline to withdraw with full refund.”

  • WILD 420 Ornithology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Taxonomic relationships and evolution of birds are outlined. Reproduction, migration and population processes of North American birds are examined.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Kyle Elliott (Fall)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and occasional field trips

    • Prerequisite: WILD 307 (formerly ZOOL 307) or permission of instructor

    • This course is scheduled for video-conferencing.

    • This course carries an additional charge of $16.54 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

Area 3: Field Studies in Ecology and Conservation

  • BIOL 240 Monteregian Flora (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Field studies of ferns, fern allies, conifers and flowering plants; the use of keys for plant identification.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Virginie Millien, Melanie Lapointe (Summer)

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 111 or permission

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken PLNT 358

    • Note: Taught at the Gault Nature Reserve. Contact instructor for specific dates, logistics: (virginie.millien [at] mcgill.ca).

    • This course is offered in the summer.

    • This course, given at the University’s Gault Nature Reserve in Mont St. Hilaire, has an additional fee of $421.55 which includes a hand lens, a textbook, handouts, lodging and supper each day.

  • BIOL 331 Ecology/Behaviour Field Course (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Methods of sampling natural populations. Testing hypotheses in nature.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Simon Reader, Rowan Barrett, Felipe Pérez Jvostov, Anna Hargreaves (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206 and BIOL 215

    • Note: Preregistration in March and April. See Course web page: http://biology.mcgill.ca/undergrad/C331A/index.htm. Meets 12-days just before the fall term, with a project report early in the fall term.

    • The field portion of this course is given at the University's Gault Nature Reserve in Mont St. Hilaire over a two-week period in August. In the fall, students prepare a report based on projects carried out during this field portion. This course has an additional fee of $571.30 which includes room and board and handouts. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.

  • BIOL 334 Applied Tropical Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Relevant to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and conservation of natural resources. Field component taught at the University's Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados, for two weeks in early May. The course is organized in a series of small-group field projects of 2-3 days each. Interested students should contact the Undergraduate Office and fill out an application form.

    Terms: Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Frederic Guichard, Thomas E Bureau, Neil Price (Winter) Frederic Guichard, Laura Nilson, Neil Price (Summer)

    • Summer

    • Prerequisites: BIOL 206; and BIOL 215 or both ENVR 200 and ENVR 202; and permission of the instructor.

    • This course, given in Barbados, has an additional fee of $1450 to cover the costs of room and board at Bellairs Research Institute, the course pack and all other expenses during the course. It does not cover tuition, airfare, flight insurance, airport taxes, meals in transit, or the cost of supplementary health insurance. The fee is refundable during the period where a student can drop the course with full refund. The Department of Biology subsidizes a portion of the cost for this activity.

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

  • GEOG 495 Field Studies - Physical Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Field research projects in physical geography. Held locally in Monteregian or Eastern Township regions. The course is organised around field projects designed to formulate and test scientific hypotheses in a physical geography discipline. May Summer session.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Summer)

    • 2-week field school

    • Prerequisites: 6 credits from the following list of Systematic Physical Geography courses: GEOG 305, GEOG 321, GEOG 322, GEOG 350, GEOG 372

    • Instructor's approval required. Additional Dept. fee $481.36 will be charged to student fee account to cover the cost of transportation, accommodations, local fees and all meals for approximately 12 nights, as the course is held at the Gault Estate at Mont St.-Hilaire during May. Application forms avail. Geog. Office or web page.

    • **Since this is a field course, the Victoria Day statutory holiday will not be taken into consideration. Therefore, students are expected to attend their lecture on Monday, May, 22, 2017.

  • GEOG 499 Subarctic Field Studies (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An introduction to the geography of the subarctic with emphasis on the application of field methods in physical and/or human geography.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or GEOG 301

    • Instructor's approval required.

    • A fee of $1,985.18 is charged to all students registered in GEOG 499 Subarctic Field Studies. This course is held at Schefferville, Quebec in late August through early September. The fee is used to support the cost of transportation, accommodations, local fees and all meals. The department subsidizes a portion of the cost of this compulsory activity for each student registered in a Geography Major or Honours program.

  • WILD 475 Desert Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : A three week field course exploring relationships between climate, geology, landforms, biodiversity, biotic adaptations and ecosystem conditions in the arid regions of Arizona and southern California. Focus is on the Sonoran and Mojave deserts but includes the transitions to adjacent grassland and forest biomes of the Sky Islands and Colorado Plateau. Exploration of issues arising from human use of land and water, and conservation in arid environments. Experiential learning involving team and individual projects and assignments before and during the field trip.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Odd-numbered Winter terms; enrollment limited to 20.

    • The course begins and ends in Phoenix AZ. Students are responsible for their transportation to/from Phoenix.

    • A course fee of $1400.00 covers the cost of transportation, camping, admissions and most meals during the field trip.

    • The course requires camping and living under desert conditions.

    • Restriction(s): Restricted to U2 and U3 students.

    • Prerequisite(s):Permission of the instructors is required to register. To be eligible students are required to have at least one systems-focused course, one ecology course and two organismal courses. Students should consult the instructors for list of appropriate courses.

Area 4: Hydrology and Water Resources

* Note: You may take only one of: GEOG 322, BREE 217, or CIVE 323.

  • BREE 217 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Bioresource Engineering : Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Shiv Prasher (Winter)

    • 3 lectures, one 2-hour lab

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken ABEN 217.

    • Note: This course carries an additional course charge of $32.25 to cover transportation costs for two field trips, which may include a visit to a national weather station and a trip to gain hands-on experience on monitoring water flow in streams.

    • Measurements and analysis of components of the water cycle. Precipitation, evaporation, infiltration and groundwater. Analysis of hydrologic data. Hydrograph theory. Hydrologic estimations for design of water control projects; flood control and reservoir routing. Integrated watershed management and water conservation. Water management systems for environmental protection.

  • CIVE 323 Hydrology and Water Resources (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : Precipitation, evaporation and transpiration. Streamflow, storage reservoirs. Groundwater hydrology. Morphology of river basins. Statistical analysis in hydrology, stochastic modelling and simulation. Case studies in hydroelectric power development, flood damage mitigation, irrigation and drainage.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Malika Khalili (Fall)

  • EPSC 549 Hydrogeology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Introduction to groundwater flow through porous media. Notions of fluid potential and hydraulic head. Darcy flux and Darcy's Law. Physical properties of porous media and their measurement. Equation of groundwater flow. Flow systems. Hydraulics of pumping and recharging wells. Notions of hydrology. Groundwater quality and contamination. Physical processes of contaminant transport.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Lauren Somers (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lectures, 1-2 hours laboratory

    • Prerequisite: permission of the instructor

  • GEOG 322 Environmental Hydrology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Quantitative, experimental study of the principles governing the movement of water at or near the Earth's surface and how the research relates to the chemistry and biology of ecosystems.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Bernhard Lehner, Tracy Rankin (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or equivalent

  • GEOG 372 Running Water Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course focuses on the physical habitat conditions found in streams, rivers, estuaries and deltas. Based on the laws governing flow of water and sediment transport, it emphasizes differences among these environments, in terms of channel form, flow patterns, substrate composition and mode of evolution. Flooding, damming, channelisation, forestry impacts.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Michel F Lapointe (Fall)

  • GEOG 537 Advanced Fluvial Geomorphology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of current advances in fluvial geomorphology: sediment entrainment and transport, alluviation and river channel evolution.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Michel F Lapointe (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite (Undergraduate): permission of instructor

  • NRSC 540 Socio-Cultural Issues in Water (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Discussion of current debates and problems related to water, especially in developing countries. Topics include: gender relations and health in the context of cultural and economic systems, and the impacts of new technologies, market structures and population growth.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: A 300- or 400-level course in water or permission of instructor.

    • 3-hour seminar

Area 5: Human Health

  • NUTR 307 Metabolism and Human Nutrition (3 credits)

    Offered by: Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : This course looks at the importance of nutrition from the molecular to the organismal levels in human health and disease. The focus will be on the significance of nutrients in regulating metabolism, and impact of genotype in the metabolism of nutrients.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Luis Agellon, Linda J Wykes (Fall)

  • PARA 410 Environment and Infection (3 credits)

    Offered by: Parasitology (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Parasitology : Infectious pathogens of humans and animals and their impact on the global environment are considered. The central tenet is that infectious pathogens are environmental risk factors. The course considers their impact on the human condition and juxtaposes the impact of control and treatment measures and environmental change.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Marilyn Scott (Winter)

  • PATH 300 Human Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pathology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Pathology : Provides a fundamental understanding of the diseases prevalent in North America, for upper level students in the biological sciences. Includes: general responses of cells and organ systems to injury; assessment of individual diseases by relating the causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prevention to the primary biological abnormalities in each disorder.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Edith Zorychta, Alexander Gregorieff, Carolyn Baglole (Winter)

  • PHAR 303 Principles of Toxicology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Pharmacology and Therapeutics (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Pharmacology and Therapeutics : Fundamental mechanisms by which toxic compounds damage a biological system (organelle, cell, organ, organism, ecosystem). Detection and quantification of toxicity and risk/benefit analysis are considered. Selected agents of current risk to human health or the environment are evaluated in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Bernard Robaire, Barbara F Hales, Edith Zorychta, Carolyn Baglole (Winter)

Area 6: Earth and Soil Sciences

  • ATOC 215 Oceans, Weather and Climate (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : Laws of motion, geostrophic wind, gradient wind. General circulation of the atmosphere and oceans, local circulation features. Air-sea interaction, including hurricanes and sea-ice formation, extra-tropical weather systems and fronts, role of the atmosphere and oceans in climate.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Timothy Merlis (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours lecture

    • Prerequisite: ATOC 214

  • EPSC 201 Understanding Planet Earth (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : Learn about Earth's origin, its place in the solar system, its internal structure, rocks and minerals, the formation of metal and fossil fuel deposits, and the extinction of dinosaurs. Discover the impact of the volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and mountain chains on Earth's past, present and future. Explore 125 million-year-old Mount Royal.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Olivia Jensen (Fall) Natalya Gomez (Winter)

    • Fall or Winter

    • 3 hours lectures; afternoon field trips

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken or are taking EPSC 233.

  • GEOG 272 Earth's Changing Surface (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to the study of landforms as products of geomorphic and geologic systems acting at and near the Earth's surface. The process geomorphology approach will be used to demonstrate how landforms of different geomorphic settings represent a dynamic balance between forces acting in the environment and the physical properties of materials present.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Wayne H Pollard (Winter)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

  • GEOG 305 Soils and Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the major properties of soils; soil formation, classification and mapping; land capability assessment; the role and response of soils in natural and disturbed environments (e.g. global change, ecosystem disturbance).

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Timothy R Moore (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours and laboratory

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 203 or introductory course in biology or geology

  • GEOG 321 Climatic Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The earth-atmosphere system, radiation and energy balances. Surface-atmosphere exchange of energy, mass and momentum and related atmospheric processes on a local and regional scale. Introduction to measurement theory and practice in micrometeorology.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • SOIL 326 Soils in a Changing Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Soil Science : Soil processes responsible for soil formation will be studied and the impact of changes to the physical and chemical environment will be discussed.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • Prerequisite: A previous course in soil science, geography, geology or permission of instructor.

Area 7: Economics

* Note: You may take AGEC 200 or ECON 208, but not both.

  • AGEC 200 Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The field of economics as it relates to the activities of individual consumers, firms and organizations. Emphasis is on the application of economic principles and concepts to everyday decision making and to the analysis of current economic issues.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Laurence B B Baker (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

  • AGEC 333 Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Agricultural Economics (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agricultural Economics : The role of resources in the environment, use of resources, and management of economic resources within the firm or organization. Problem-solving, case studies involving private and public decision-making in organizations are utilized.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Paul Thomassin (Fall)

    • Fall

    • Prerequisites: AGEC 200 or equivalent

  • ECON 208 Microeconomic Analysis and Applications (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A university-level introduction to demand and supply, consumer behaviour, production theory, market structures and income distribution theory.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Mayssun El-Attar Vilalta, Paul Dickinson, Uma Kaplan (Fall) Paul Dickinson (Winter) Ailin He (Summer)

  • ECON 326 Ecological Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic and structural aspects of the ecological crisis. A course in which subjects discussed include the conflict between economic growth and the laws of thermodynamics; the search for alternative economic indicators; the fossil fuels crisis; and "green'' fiscal policy.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Robin Thomas Naylor (Fall)

  • ECON 347 Economics of Climate Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The course focuses on the economic implications of, and problems posed by, predictions of global warming due to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Attention is given to economic policies such as carbon taxes and tradeable emission permits and to the problems of displacing fossil fuels with new energy technologies.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and ECON 209 or those listed under Prerequisites above

  • ECON 405 Natural Resource Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Topics include: Malthusian and Ricardian Scarcity; optimal depletion of renewable and non-renewable resources; exploration, risk and industry structure, and current resources, rent and taxation. Current public policies applied to the resource industries, particularly those of a regulatory nature.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Robert D Cairns (Winter)

  • GEOG 216 Geography of the World Economy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course introduces the geography of the world economic system. It describes the spatial distribution of economic activities and examines the factors which influence their changing location. Case studies from both "developed" and "developing" countries will test the different geographical theories presented in lectures.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Oliver T Coomes, Sebastien Breau (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 hours

Area 8: Development and Underdevelopment

  • ANTH 212 Anthropology of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Processes of developmental change, as they affect small communities in the Third World and in unindustrialized parts of developed countries. Problems of technological change, political integration, population growth, industrialization, urban growth, social services, infrastructure and economic dependency.

    Terms: Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Pierre-Alexandre Paquet (Winter) Graham Fox (Summer)

    • Winter

  • ANTH 418 Environment and Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Advanced study of the environmental crisis in developing and advanced industrial nations, with emphasis on the social and cultural dimensions of natural resource management and environmental change. Each year, the seminar will focus on a particular set of issues, delineated by type of resource, geographic region, or analytical problem.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: John Galaty (Fall)

  • ECON 313 Economic Development 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Microeconomic theories of economic development and empirical evidence on population, labour, firms, poverty. Inequality and environment.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Matthieu Chemin (Fall) Sonia Laszlo (Winter) Uma Kaplan (Summer)

  • ECON 314 Economic Development 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Macroeconomic development issues, including theories of growth, public finance, debt, currency crises, corruption, structural adjustment, democracy and global economic organization.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Uma Kaplan (Fall) Franque Grimard (Winter)

  • GEOG 408 Geography of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Examines the geographical dimensions of development policy, specifically the relationships between the process of development and human-induced environmental change. Focuses on environmental sustainability, struggles over resource control, population and poverty, and levels of governance (the role of the state, non-governmental organizations, and local communities).

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Jon Unruh (Fall)

  • GEOG 410 Geography of Underdevelopment: Current Problems (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An examination of the cultural, political, and economic mechanisms and manifestations of contemporary underdevelopment and the response to it from different regional and national peripheral societies within the dominant world economic system.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 216 or permission of instructor

  • POLI 227 Developing Areas/Introduction (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An introduction to Third World politics. A comparative examination of the legacies of colonialism, the achievement of independence, and contemporary dynamics of political and socio-economic development in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Topics include modernization, dependency, state-building and national integration, revolution, the role of the military, and democratization.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Daniel Douek (Winter)

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas.

  • POLI 445 International Political Economy: Monetary Relations (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : Advanced course in international political economy; the politics of international of monetary relations, such as international rules governing international finance, the reasons for and consequences of financial flows, and the functioning of international financial bodies such as the IMF and World Bank.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Mark R Brawley (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: POLI 243 or permission of the instructor.

    • Note: The field is International Politics.

Area 9: Cultures and People

  • ANTH 206 Environment and Culture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Introduction to ecological anthropology, focusing on social and cultural adaptations to different environments, human impact on the environment, cultural constructions of the environment, management of common resources, and conflict over the use of resources.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Pierre-Alexandre Paquet (Fall)

    • Fall

  • ANTH 339 Ecological Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Intensive study of theories and cases in ecological anthropology. Theories are examined and tested through comparative case-study analysis. Cultural constructions of "nature" and "environment" are compared and analyzed. Systems of resource management and conflicts over the use of resources are studied in depth.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Colin H Scott (Winter)

  • ENVR 421 Montreal: Environmental History and Sustainability (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : This course will focus on the role of place and history in the cities in which we live and in our understanding of sustainability. Each year, students will work to develop a historical reconstruction of the natural environment of Montreal and of its links to the cultural landscape, building on the work of previous cohorts of students.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Sylvie de Blois, Mariève Isabel (Summer)

    • Each year focuses on making a specific and unique contribution to The Hochelaga Project; topics vary as required.

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVR 301 or equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

    • Corequisite(s): ENVR 422

  • GEOG 210 Global Places and Peoples (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to key themes in human geography. Maps and the making, interpretation and contestation of landscapes, 'place', and territory. Investigation of globalization and the spatial organization of human geo-politics, and urban and rural environments.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Brian Robinson, Yann le Polain de Waroux (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

Area 10: Human Ecology and Health

  • ANTH 227 Medical Anthropology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Beliefs and practices concerning sickness and healing are examined in a variety of Western and non-Western settings. Special attention is given to cultural constructions of the body and to theories of disease causation and healing efficacy. Topics include international health, medical pluralism, transcultural psychiatry, and demography.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Darcie De Angelo (Fall) Samuele Collu (Summer)

    • Fall

  • GEOG 300 Human Ecology in Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : The course will examine research approaches in human ecology since its inception early in this century. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical shifts that have led to its emergence as an important social science perspective. The course will also involve case studies to evaluate the methodological utility of the approach.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: George Wenzel (Winter)

  • GEOG 303 Health Geography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Discussion of the research questions and methods of health geography. Particular emphasis on health inequalities at multiple geographic scales and the theoretical links between characteristics of places and the health of people.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Mylene Riva (Winter)

  • PHIL 343 Biomedical Ethics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An investigation of ethical issues as they arise in the practice of medicine (informed consent, e.g.) or in the application of medical technology (in vitro fertilization, euthanasia, e.g.)

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Iwao Hirose (Fall)

  • SOCI 225 Medicine and Health in Modern Society (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Socio-medical problems and ways in which sociological analysis and research are being used to understand and deal with them. Canadian and Québec problems include: poverty and health; mental illness; aging; death and dying; professionalism; health service organization.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • SOCI 309 Health and Illness (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Health and illness as social rather than purely bio-medical phenomena. Topics include: studies of ill persons, health care occupations and organizations; poverty and health; inequalities in access to and use of health services; recent policies, ideologies, and problems in reform of health services organization.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

Area 11: Spirituality, Philosophy, and Thought

  • EDER 461 Society and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Integrated Studies in Ed (Faculty of Education)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Factors influencing patterns of stability and change in major social institutions and the implications for formal and non-formal education.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • PHIL 221 Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : A survey of the development of modern science since the Eighteenth Century.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Eran Tal (Winter)

  • PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An introductory discussion of central ethical questions (the value of persons, or the relationship of rights and utilities, for example) through the investigation of currently disputed social and political issues. Specific issues to be discussed may include pornography and censorship, affirmative action, civil disobedience, punishment, abortion, and euthanasia.

    Terms: Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Mathieu Baril (Winter) Nicholas Dunn (Summer)

  • PHIL 341 Philosophy of Science 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : A discussion of philosophical problems as they arise in the context of scientific practice and enquiry. Such issues as the philosophical presuppositions of the physical and social sciences, the nature of scientific method and its epistemological implications will be addressed.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: David Gaber (Winter)

  • PHIL 348 Philosophy of Law 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : A discussion of the nature of justice and law, and of the relationship between them.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Natalie Stoljar (Fall)

    • Restriction: This course is intended for students with a non-professional interest in law, as well as for those considering law as a profession

  • RELG 270 Religious Ethics and the Environment (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Environmental potential of various religious traditions and secular perspectives, including animal rights, ecofeminism, and deep ecology.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: David Goodin (Winter)

    • Fall: Macdonald Campus (Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue). Winter: Downtown Campus.

  • RELG 340 Religion and the Sciences (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Philosophies of science and of religion have created a more positive dialogue on questions of method, symbolism and rationality. Examines key issues (e.g. creation and evolution; objectivity and involvement; determinism and freedom) raised by natural and social sciences, and various possible solutions.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall and Summer

  • RELG 370 Religion and Human Rights (3 credits)

    Offered by: Religious Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Religious Studies : Social justice and human rights issues as key aspects of modem religious ethics. Topics include: the relationship of religion to the modem human rights movement; religious perspectives on the universality of human rights; the scope and limits of religious freedom; conflicts between religion and rights.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Daniel M Cere (Fall)

    • Winter

Area 12: Environmental Management

* Note: If WILD 415 is taken, 1 additional credit of complementary courses must be taken.

  • AGRI 210 Agro-Ecological History (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Introduction to the environmental consequences of agriculture through time, relating the cultural diversity of agronomic practices to regionally varied ecological processes.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • 3 lectures

  • AGRI 435 Soil and Water Quality Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Management of soil and water systems for sustainability. Cause of soil degradation, surface and groundwater contamination by agricultural chemicals and toxic pollutants. Human health and safety concerns. Water-table management. Soil and water conservation techniques will be examined with an emphasis on methods of prediction and best management practices.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures and one 3-hour lab

    • This course carries an additional charge of $30.45 to cover the cost of transportation with respect to a field trip. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

  • AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Physical environment challenges, centered on water, being faced by an island nation. Guest speakers, field study tours and laboratory tests. Private, government and NGO institutional context of conservation strategies, and water quantity and quality analyses for water management specific to Barbados.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Susan J Gaskin (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 452.

  • ENVB 437 Assessing Environmental Impact (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Environmental Biology : Theories and procedures of assessing environmental impact. An examination of the environmental impact of existing programs and projects to examine their accuracy in predicting consequences and attenuating undesirable effects.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Gordon Hickey (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 2 lectures

    • Restrictions: U2 students and above. Not open to students who have taken WILD 437 or NRSC 437.

  • ENVR 422 Montreal Urban Sustainability Analysis (3 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Applied and experience-based learning opportunities are employed to critically assess Montreal as a sustainable city through research, discussion, and field trips. The urban environment is considered through various specific dimensions, ranging from: waste, energy, urban agriculture, green spaces and design, or transportation.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Julia Freeman, Kevin Manaugh (Summer)

    • Prerequisite(s): ENVR 301 or equivalent, or permission from the instructor.

    • Corequisite(s): ENVR 421

  • GEOG 302 Environmental Management 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : An ecological analysis of the physical and biotic components of natural resource systems. Emphasis on scientific, technological and institutional aspects of environmental management. Study of the use of biological resources and of the impact of individual processes.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Fall)

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: Any 200-level course in Geography or MSE or BIOL 308 or permission of instructor.

  • GEOG 404 Environmental Management 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Practical application of environmental planning, analysis and management techniques with reference to the needs and problems of developing areas. Special challenges posed by cultural differences and traditional resource systems are discussed. This course involves practical field work in a developing area (Kenya or Panama).

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 302 or permission of instructor

  • NRSC 333 Pollution and Bioremediation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : The environmental contaminants which cause pollution; sources, amounts and transport of pollutants in water, air and soil; waste management.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Lyle Whyte, Jessica Head (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken WILD 333

  • WILD 401 Fisheries and Wildlife Management (4 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Principles of fisheries and wildlife management are considered and current practices of research and management are discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Murray Mitchell Humphries, Kyle Elliott (Fall)

    • Fall

    • 3 lectures, one 2-hour lab and one week field laboratory prior to fall term

    • Prerequisite: WILD 307 or permission of instructor

    • A $330.86 fee is charged to all students registered in WILD 401, Fisheries and Wildlife Management, a course that has a required field trip. This fee is used to support the cost of excursions, accommodations, food and fees associated with visiting a research facility in New York. The Department of Natural Resource Sciences subsidizes a portion of the cost of this compulsory activity.

  • WILD 415 Conservation Law (2 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : A study of the various federal, provincial and municipal laws affecting wildlife habitat. Topics include: laws to protect wild birds and animals; the regulation of hunting; legal protection of trees and flowers, sanctuaries, reserves, parks; techniques of acquiring and financing desirable land, property owner rights.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Fall

    • 2 lectures

  • WOOD 441 Integrated Forest Management (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Woodland Resources : The study of silviculture and silvics and their application to forest management to sustain the production of wood and other ecological goods and services such as wildlife, water and landscape in natural forests and rural environments (agroforestry). Acquisition of practical skills in forest surveying and computer simulation of forest growth.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Benoit Cote (Winter)

McGill School of Environment—2017-2018 (last updated Aug. 23, 2017) (disclaimer)