Fulbright Visiting Research Chair

RGCS hosts a visiting Fulbright Chair for stays of one semester, extendable to up to one year.  The Chair receives a stipend of $US 25,000, and is expected to be in residence at McGill conducting research throughout the term of the award. The Chair will be a Fellow of RGCS during his or her stay, expected to take an active part in the Group's intellectual life, including regular participation and one presentation at the RGCS faculty and fellows workshop.  There is no teaching requirement.  The Chair may be asked to deliver 1-2 public lectures on the topic of his or her research, to guest-lecture to an appropriate class, or to take part in appropriate workshop or seminar sessions.  Previous chaircholders include Andrew Rehfeld (Washington University in St. Louis, Political Science), James Gardner (SUNY Buffalo, Law), Erin Delaney (Northwestern, Law and Political Science), and Jack Jackson (Whitman College).

 

Applications are now being accepted for the 2018-19 academic year.  

 

Visiting Fulbright Chair in Constitutional and Political Theory
 

Applications are invited for a one-semester or full-year Visiting Fulbright Research Chair in Constitutional and Political Theory in academic year 2018-19. This fellowship for US citizens includes a $US 25,000 stipend with no teaching responsibilities. It is intended for those holding faculty rank who are eligible for leave or sabbatical from their home institutions.

Hosted in the Research Group on Constitutional Studies (RGCS), a unit of the Yan P. Lin Centre for the Study of Freedom and Global Orders in the Ancient and Modern Worlds, this award is open to established or emerging scholars in political theory and is open with respect to methodology and approach in that field. Applications are also invited from scholars in neighbouring areas of legal theory and jurisprudence, political philosophy and political science. The Chair will pursue research in political and constitutional theory broadly construed. The ability to engage with scholars and students across methodologies — normative, empirical, intellectual-historical, jurisprudential, and formal, for example — is more important than particular areas of emphasis.

Sample areas of interest include: normative analyses of fundamental rights and of such basic constitutional structures as the separation of powers or federalism; democratic theory, especially as it pertains to political institutions; the history of political thought about constitutional government or constitutional forms; and questions of justice about the constitutional basic structure of a society, ranging from property and market relations to the legal organization of family life.

The Chair-holder will be in residence at RGCS for one semester, will deliver one public lecture, regularly attend and also present work at an RGCS workshop, and, if appropriate, guest-lecture or lead guest discussions in political science classes. The Chair will more generally take an active part in the intellectual life of McGill, RGCS, and the Groupe de Recherche Interuniversitaire en Philosophie Politique.

Full eligibility information and the online application are available at http://www.fulbright.ca/programs/american-scholars/primary-awards/policy.html . Those interested are encouraged to contact Jacob Levy at rgcs.mcgill [at] gmail.com (especially for questions about thematic fit) and Brad Hector at bhector [at] fulbright.ca (especially for procedural questions) early in the application process. Applications must be fully complete by August 1.