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Upcoming Seminars & Events

 


DEPARTMENTAL SEMINARS

All lectures take place at 3647 Peel Street from  4:30 pm-6:00 pm, Don Bates Seminar Room 101 unless noted otherwise.

Please note that seminar times MAY VARY, so be sure to check each individual listing carefully!


SEMINARS WINTER 2015

 

  • March 18

Daniel Carpenter

"Therapeutic and Economic Effects of Efficacy-Based Drug Withdrawals: The Drug Efficacy Study Initiative and its Manifold Legacies"

The empirical study of pharmaceutical regulation institutions has been marked by the confusion of safety-related policy interventions and efficacy-based policy interventions. As a result, it is difficult to infer policy implications about efficacy regulation from observed institutional changes that also target safety. In this paper we examine a unique quasi-experiment in the history of American therapeutics -- the Drug Efficacy Study Implementation (DESI) of 1968 to 1970, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) removed hundreds of widely used drugs -- all of them judged “safe” under the law prevailing from 1938 to 1962 -- from the American marketplace on the basis of efficacy judgments alone. We examine the cross- therapeutic distribution of these market removals, using them as predictors of two downstream variables of interest: (a) pharmaceutical “innovation” (measured by the number of new molecular entities produced in an area), and (b) therapeutic effects (measured by mortality aggregates in the therapeutic area). Preliminary results are reported for the mortality data, and suggest that the withdrawals were associated with differentially reduced mortality in the 15-20 years following. In our simplest fixed-effects panel regressions, a doubling of DESI withdrawals is associated with a 15-24 percent reduction in mortality in the same therapeutic area 12 years later. We discuss potential threats to causal inference, but note that such findings would be inconsistent with libertarian theories of pharmaceutical regulation. Our essay also poses the possibility of highly concrete and tangible effects from standardization regimes, and highlights how these regimes are deeply connected to forms of gatekeeping and directive power of regulators.  daniel_carpenter-_march_18_2015_poster.pdf

 

  • March 25

David Reubi

"Epidemiological Reason – Epidemiologists, Philanthropists and Global Health"

In this paper, I suggest that the ubiquity of regimes of quantification, counting practices, metrics and numbers in contemporary global health comes from the way in which the field has been shaped by epidemiological styles of reasoning – grids of intelligibility and action articulated around theories, techniques and institutions that stem from epidemiology and related bodies of knowledge. In contrast to much of the literature on the subject, which focuses on the shortcomings of epidemiological reason, the paper draws attention to the productive dimension of epidemiologists and epidemiological knowledge by showing how they contribute to the production of new forms of government and accountability of life. Furthermore, eschewing the often vague and facile association of epidemiological reason with neoliberal theories and audit culture found in much of the literature, the paper also seeks to emphasise the rather more complex genealogy of this thought style. To do this, the article focuses on the efforts of the Bloomberg and Gates foundations to address the smoking epidemic in the developing world, which I have been researching over the last few years.

 

 

  • April 9

Joao Biehl

(CANCELLED! WILL BE RE-SCHEDULED FOR FALL 2015)

 

  • January 28

João Arriscado Nunes

Center for Social Studies and School of Economics
University of Coimbra, Portugal

“When the mouth is silent, the body speaks. When the mouth speaks, the body heals”: exploring the repertoires of experience-based knowledge

  • February 11

Martyn Pickersgill
Centre for Population Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh

“Environment, Brain and Epigenome: Intertwining Sites of Intervention in British Health Discourse”

 

  •     February 25

Nima Bassiri

“Pathological Imposters: Traumatic Neurosis and the Forensic Quandaries of Mimicry Disorders in 19th C. Brain Medicine”

 

March 11

  • Veena Das

“Markets and medicines: conceptualizing heterogeneity”

Co-sponsored with the Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and the Department of Global Health


 

SEMINARS FALL 2014

September 

  • September  17

Prof. Jean Francois Braunstein

Professor  l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne                                                  

"Ethics & History of Science in Georges Canguilhem:Psychology, Milieu, Medicine."


  • September 18

Workshop on Canguilhem's historical epistemology with Jean Francois Braunstein.

TBA

 



OCTOBER

  • October 16 & 17 

Inaugural interdisciplinary workshop

"Vesalius at 500: Text, Image, Practice and Reception in Renaissance Anatomy"

CANCELLED

 


 

  • October 22

Prof.Vololona Rabeharisoa

Centre de sociologie de l’innovation, PSL Mines-ParisTech
 

"What is rareness the cause of ? Patient groups’ engagement with research and the problematization of rare diseases."

 


  • October 29

Prof. Julie Livingston

Department of History, Rutgers University

"Co-infection and co-morbidity on an epidemic scale: thinking with HIV, TB, and Cancer in Botswana."

 


November 

  • November 5th 

ANNUAL OSLER LECTURE

Prof. Margaret Lock, Officer of the Order of Canada, McGill University, Professor Emerita

"The Alzheimer Enigma in an Aging World"

Charles F. Martin Amphitheatre
McIntyre Medical Science Building, 5th Floor (Rm 504)
Wednesday, November 5th, 2014, 6 p.m.

Address:

3655 promenade Sir William Osler

Montreal, QC H3G 1Y6.
Canada

 


 

  • November 12 th

Prof.Gisli Palsson

Department of Anthropology, University of Iceland

"Anthropologies of Life"


 

  • November  26

Lisa Haushofer, MD and PhD candidate in the History of Science Department  at Harvard University
                                  
“Writing to Mr. Benger: Rethinking testimonial advertising and medical-commercial relations in the context of medicinal foods”
 


 

SEMINARS WINTER 2014

January

  • wednesday 22nd

Prof. Daniel Weinstock

Director, McGill University , Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP)

"Daniels v.Daniels: Why He Got it (almost) Right the First Time"


  • wednesday 29th

Dr.Andrew Hogan

 Lecturer in the Program in Science, Technology & Society at the University of Virginia 

"Intellectual Disability in the Age of Targeted Prevention: Establishing Fragile X Syndrome as a Genomic Disease"

 


February

  • Monday February 3rd

Professors Tobias Rees (McGill), Stephen Collier (New School), James Ferguson (Stanford), Lawrence Cohen (Berkeley) &  Hirokazu Miyazaki (Cornell).

"The Neoliberal Social"- Workshop location TBA


 

  • wednesday 12th

Alexandra Bacopoulos-Viau

New York University, History, Post doctoral fellow

"From the Writing Cure to the Talking Cure: Revisiting the Discovery of the  Unconscious" 

 



DR. MARTIN A. ENTIN LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

  • Wednesday 19th

Dr. David Edgerton

Hans Rausing Professor of the History of Science and Technology & Professor of Modern British History

“On thinking about an old country: old and new in the making of twentieth-century British medicine

 

The event will take place at 6:00pm

Chancellor Day Hall, Faculty of Law

Moot Court Room

3644 Peel Street

 


 

  • wednesday 26th

Prof.Madeleine Akrich

Professor, Ecole de Mines, Paris

"Towards an Evidence-Based Activism? Patients' Organizations Engagement with Knowledge" 


March

  • Monday March 10th

Professors  Tobias  Rees (McGill), Allan Young (McGill) , Peter Redfield (UNC-Chapel Hill), Hannah Landecker (UCLA).

"The Biological Social"-Workshop location TBA.


  • Thursday March 20

 "After IVF: Is the  Future of Reproduction Technological?" 

 

Prof. Sarah Franklin

 Director, Reproductive Sociology Research Group , Department of Sociology, University of Cambridge (co-sponsored with HPS & the  Institute of Gender Studies) 

SSOM Don Bates Seminar  Room 101 from  3-5 p.m.


  •  wednesday March 26th

Prof. Daniel Navon

Harvard University, Robert Wood Johnson Scholar in Health Policy Research

"Mobilizing Mutations: New Kinds of People at the  Intersection of Genetics, Medicine and Social Action."


 April

 

CANCELLATION: DR. MARTIN A. ENTIN LECTURE IN THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE  

Prof. Alison Winter

Professor of the History of Science and Medicine, University of Chicago

"The New Age: An Experimental History"

 THIS LECTURE HAS BEEN POSTPONED FOR THE  NEXT ACADEMIC YEAR-TBA.


  • Monday April 7  

 Professors Tobias Rees (McGill), Ramah McKay (University of Minnesota), Miriam Ticktin (New School), Carlo Caduff (King's College London)

"The Post -Social"-Workshop location TBA.

 


Would you like us to add your name to our seminar list?