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Money coming to the Auclair Lab from the other end of the world!

Professor Auclair was recently awarded funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia. The two co-applicants involved in this application, Prof. Auclair and Prof. K. J. Saliba from The Australian National University, will  share approximately $185,000 per year for 3 years to work on "Understanding and targeting coenzyme A biosynthesis and utilization in Plasmodium falciparum".

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Published on : 24 Nov 2016

Palladium(II) Dithiocarbamates - Anticancer Metallodrugs of the Future?

Most chemistry students are well aware of the anticancer properties of cisplatin, cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl2,  as a result of the pioneering work of Professor Barnett Rosenberg and his colleagues at the Michigan State University in the late 1960s. Over the years, this simple Pt(II) coordination complex and some structurally closely related ones have become the FDA-approved drugs of choice for cancer treatment, especially ovarian and testicular cancers.

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Published on : 23 Nov 2016

Creativity and collaboration: Not talking to your colleagues is holding you back

THERE’S plenty of hullabaloo surrounding the idea of creativity in the workplace. As the world grows increasingly automated, it seems natural to fear that creativity — the signature characteristic of human intellect — will become less and less important over time.

Published on : 22 Sep 2014

CKUT Interview with Lilith Wyatt

CKUT's All Things McGill interviewed Lilith Wyatt regarding the Sustainability Projects Fund and the recent referendum process that will secure funding for the initiative over the next 5 years.  [swf file="https://www.mcgill.ca/sustainability/sites/mcgill.ca.sustainability/files/lilith_interview.mp3"]

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Published on : 21 May 2013

Early music lessons boost brain development

Montreal researchers find that music lessons before age seven create stronger connections in the brain If you started piano lessons in grade one, or played the recorder in kindergarten, thank your parents and teachers. Those lessons you dreaded – or loved – helped develop your brain.

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Published on : 12 Feb 2013