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«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 08/27/2015 - 09:40

Rainbow over Niagara Falls. / Photo: Vincent Allaire

Our late-August heat wave has given way to cooler, more seasonal temperatures reminding us (as if we need reminding) that summer is all but over. But before we give way completely to the fall and, ugh, winter, we give you our annual summer vacation photos taken by members of the McGill community as they relaxed, recharged and rediscovered the simple joys of life.

As the pictures below demonstrate, McGillians are a diverse bunch. We travelled far (Australia, Germany, Denmark) and we stayed close to home (Montreal, Mont Tremblant, Quebec City). We soaked up the sun on glorious beaches in Cuba and climbed snow-crested peaks in B.C. We swam in rivers, lakes, oceans and pools and at least two of us took in the beauty of Niagara Falls.

If you would like to add your vacation pictures to the gallery, send high resolution shots and caption information (who, what, where) to Neale McDevitt.

Click on each thumbnail to enlarge the picture.

Postcards from around the world

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 08/27/2015 - 09:40

Rainbow over Niagara Falls. / Photo: Vincent Allaire

Our late-August heat wave has given way to cooler, more seasonal temperatures reminding us (as if we need reminding) that summer is all but over. But before we give way completely to the fall and, ugh, winter, we give you our annual summer vacation photos taken by members of the McGill community as they relaxed, recharged and rediscovered the simple joys of life.

As the pictures below demonstrate, McGillians are a diverse bunch. We travelled far (Australia, Germany, Denmark) and we stayed close to home (Montreal, Mont Tremblant, Quebec City). We soaked up the sun on glorious beaches in Cuba and climbed snow-crested peaks in B.C. We swam in rivers, lakes, oceans and pools and at least two of us took in the beauty of Niagara Falls.

If you would like to add your vacation pictures to the gallery, send high resolution shots and caption information (who, what, where) to Neale McDevitt.

Click on each thumbnail to enlarge the picture.

Sept. 1: Engage McGill

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 08/26/2015 - 11:04

Campus Life & Engagement invites the McGill Community (that means you!) to Engage McGill, our welcome-back event, taking place Tuesday, Sept. 1, from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Lower Field.

What better way to kick off the new academic year than having a great time with your friends, family, and colleagues? There will be hot dogs, popcorn, carnival games, smoothies and a number of performances by our talented student body. We’ll also be setting up a friendly Student Staff Tug-Of-War, which you can sign-up for here.

Check out the website for more information and to join the Facebook event! We can’t wait to see you.

 

Sept. 1: Engage McGill

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 08/26/2015 - 11:04

Campus Life & Engagement invites the McGill Community (that means you!) to Engage McGill, our welcome-back event, taking place Tuesday, Sept. 1, from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Lower Field.

What better way to kick off the new academic year than having a great time with your friends, family, and colleagues? There will be hot dogs, popcorn, carnival games, smoothies and a number of performances by our talented student body. We’ll also be setting up a friendly Student Staff Tug-Of-War, which you can sign-up for here.

Check out the website for more information and to join the Facebook event! We can’t wait to see you.

 

Vitamin D deficiency linked to MS risk

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 14:29

Low levels of vitamin D doubles the risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Low levels of vitamin D significantly increase the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study led by Dr. Brent Richards of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, and published in PLOS Medicine. This finding, the result of a sophisticated Mendelian randomization analysis, confirms a long‐standing hypothesis that low vitamin D is strongly associated with an increased susceptibility to MS. This connection is independent of other factors associated with low vitamin D levels, such as obesity.

“Our finding is important from a public health perspective because vitamin D insufficiency is common, especially in northern countries like Canada where exposure to sunlight – a common natural source of vitamin D – is decreased through the long winter and where we see disproportionately high rates of MS,” asserts Dr. Richards, who is also an Associate Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and William Dawson Scholar at McGill University. “We would recommend that individuals, particularly those with a family history of MS, should ensure that they maintain adequate vitamin D levels. This is a common sense precaution, given that vitamin D supplementation is generally safe and inexpensive.”

Adequate intake of vitamin D is defined by the United States’ Institute of Medicine as 600 international units per day for both males and females under the age of 70. Many people, especially in northern climates, may require supplements in order to maintain this level.

MS, a progressively degenerative disease, is the most common permanent neurological disorder affecting young adults. It is a debilitating autoimmune condition that most often strikes people in their twenties or early thirties. The prospect that vitamin D may serve as a protective measure to prevent its onset is a very exciting development.

“The link between vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency and risk of developing MS has been an important area of investigation in the MS research community,” says Dr. Karen Lee, Vice President of Research at the MS Society of Canada. “This research brings us a step closer to understanding whether low vitamin D is a trigger of MS and not just a result of the disease itself. I’m encouraged by the data and hope that it will prompt further research into whether supplementing with vitamin D could reduce the risk or slow the progression of MS.”

By taking the precaution of maintaining a normal level of vitamin D, a person at risk could decrease their risk of acquiring MS by an important degree. “While low vitamin D is by no means the only risk factor, we have identified one risk that can be removed from the equation, which could have a significant impact towards preventing this terrible disease,” concludes Lauren Mokry, who is the first author on the paper and a graduate student at McGill.

Read the study

 

 

Vitamin D deficiency linked to MS risk

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 14:29

Low levels of vitamin D doubles the risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Low levels of vitamin D significantly increase the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study led by Dr. Brent Richards of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, and published in PLOS Medicine. This finding, the result of a sophisticated Mendelian randomization analysis, confirms a long‐standing hypothesis that low vitamin D is strongly associated with an increased susceptibility to MS. This connection is independent of other factors associated with low vitamin D levels, such as obesity.

“Our finding is important from a public health perspective because vitamin D insufficiency is common, especially in northern countries like Canada where exposure to sunlight – a common natural source of vitamin D – is decreased through the long winter and where we see disproportionately high rates of MS,” asserts Dr. Richards, who is also an Associate Professor of Medicine and Human Genetics and William Dawson Scholar at McGill University. “We would recommend that individuals, particularly those with a family history of MS, should ensure that they maintain adequate vitamin D levels. This is a common sense precaution, given that vitamin D supplementation is generally safe and inexpensive.”

Adequate intake of vitamin D is defined by the United States’ Institute of Medicine as 600 international units per day for both males and females under the age of 70. Many people, especially in northern climates, may require supplements in order to maintain this level.

MS, a progressively degenerative disease, is the most common permanent neurological disorder affecting young adults. It is a debilitating autoimmune condition that most often strikes people in their twenties or early thirties. The prospect that vitamin D may serve as a protective measure to prevent its onset is a very exciting development.

“The link between vitamin D insufficiency or deficiency and risk of developing MS has been an important area of investigation in the MS research community,” says Dr. Karen Lee, Vice President of Research at the MS Society of Canada. “This research brings us a step closer to understanding whether low vitamin D is a trigger of MS and not just a result of the disease itself. I’m encouraged by the data and hope that it will prompt further research into whether supplementing with vitamin D could reduce the risk or slow the progression of MS.”

By taking the precaution of maintaining a normal level of vitamin D, a person at risk could decrease their risk of acquiring MS by an important degree. “While low vitamin D is by no means the only risk factor, we have identified one risk that can be removed from the equation, which could have a significant impact towards preventing this terrible disease,” concludes Lauren Mokry, who is the first author on the paper and a graduate student at McGill.

Read the study

 

 

Cont. Studies gets $1.2M in support of Indigenous programming

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 13:16

By Elana Trager

McGill’s School of Continuing Studies will receive a multi-year grant totalling over $1.2 million from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) to continue designing and delivering education programs for indigenous people. The AANDC accepted two proposals that are part of the School’s Online Courses for Northern Aboriginals in Canada project.

“We were absolutely ecstatic when we heard the news,” says Dr. Carmen Sicilia, Associate Dean and Director of Career and Professional Development at the School of Continuing Studies. “Ecstatic, as well as relieved. It means we can continue our working partnership with communities such as the Cree Nation of Chisasibi, and provide indigenous populations with the opportunity to access educational programs at McGill University.”

The McGill School of Continuing Studies currently offers online courses in Business Management and Entrepreneurship for Indigenous People, and will launch an Online Certificate in Information Systems in fall 2015. The School’s Career and Professional Development unit has been working closely with 10 communities in the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Territory, and the Cree Nation of Chisasibi has been one of their strongest partners.

“This program is exactly what I was looking for,” says student Stephanie Jonah, who grew up in the Cree community of Waskaganish in the Eeyou Istchee territory. “It’s very practical, and it’s given me more confidence to suggest ideas, go after promotions and challenge myself at my present workplace.”

The Online Courses for Northern Aboriginals in Canada project consists of McGill credit courses tailored specifically for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people living in remote areas of Quebec and Northern Canada. Online courses in Business Management and Entrepreneurship for Indigenous People include topics such as accounting, public administration, communications, project management, and organizational behavior. The Online Certificate in Information System includes courses in programming techniques, database design, and information systems security; all classes are delivered in a flexible online format.

The School works closely with a local coordinator to oversee program administration, while Band Councils, local economic development offices, indigenous Nations and governments provide local resources such as computers and classrooms.

Learn more about the School of Continuing Studies’ online programming.

 

Cont. Studies gets $1.2M in support of Indigenous programming

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 08/25/2015 - 13:16

By Elana Trager

McGill’s School of Continuing Studies will receive a multi-year grant totalling over $1.2 million from Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) to continue designing and delivering education programs for indigenous people. The AANDC accepted two proposals that are part of the School’s Online Courses for Northern Aboriginals in Canada project.

“We were absolutely ecstatic when we heard the news,” says Dr. Carmen Sicilia, Associate Dean and Director of Career and Professional Development at the School of Continuing Studies. “Ecstatic, as well as relieved. It means we can continue our working partnership with communities such as the Cree Nation of Chisasibi, and provide indigenous populations with the opportunity to access educational programs at McGill University.”

The McGill School of Continuing Studies currently offers online courses in Business Management and Entrepreneurship for Indigenous People, and will launch an Online Certificate in Information Systems in fall 2015. The School’s Career and Professional Development unit has been working closely with 10 communities in the Eeyou Istchee James Bay Territory, and the Cree Nation of Chisasibi has been one of their strongest partners.

“This program is exactly what I was looking for,” says student Stephanie Jonah, who grew up in the Cree community of Waskaganish in the Eeyou Istchee territory. “It’s very practical, and it’s given me more confidence to suggest ideas, go after promotions and challenge myself at my present workplace.”

The Online Courses for Northern Aboriginals in Canada project consists of McGill credit courses tailored specifically for First Nations, Inuit and Métis people living in remote areas of Quebec and Northern Canada. Online courses in Business Management and Entrepreneurship for Indigenous People include topics such as accounting, public administration, communications, project management, and organizational behavior. The Online Certificate in Information System includes courses in programming techniques, database design, and information systems security; all classes are delivered in a flexible online format.

The School works closely with a local coordinator to oversee program administration, while Band Councils, local economic development offices, indigenous Nations and governments provide local resources such as computers and classrooms.

Learn more about the School of Continuing Studies’ online programming.

 

Tuesday protests could snarl morning traffic

«McGill Reporter» - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 16:58

A pair of demonstrations scheduled for tomorrow could slow morning traffic around the downtown campus.

Beginning at 7 a.m., members of the Fédération syndicale des enseignants will gather in front of Premier Philippe Couillard’s office at 2001 McGill College to protest the provincial government’s austerity measures.

Montreal taxi drivers will also be out in force tomorrow morning in front of Premier Couillard’s office to protest UberX, the ride-sharing service. Beginning at 9:30 a.m., between 50 and 100 vehicles are expected to gather at 2001 McGill College before making their way to the Technoparc near the Victoria Bridge.

The demonstrations could result in traffic delays through the downtown core.

 

Tuesday protests could snarl morning traffic

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Mon, 08/24/2015 - 16:58

A pair of demonstrations scheduled for tomorrow could slow morning traffic around the downtown campus.

Beginning at 7 a.m., members of the Fédération syndicale des enseignants will gather in front of Premier Philippe Couillard’s office at 2001 McGill College to protest the provincial government’s austerity measures.

Montreal taxi drivers will also be out in force tomorrow morning in front of Premier Couillard’s office to protest UberX, the ride-sharing service. Beginning at 9:30 a.m., between 50 and 100 vehicles are expected to gather at 2001 McGill College before making their way to the Technoparc near the Victoria Bridge.

The demonstrations could result in traffic delays through the downtown core.

 

Harnessing the butterfly effect

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:23

New method could improve atmospheric forecasts over months, decades, and could explain “pause” in global warming

By Vincent Allaire

The atmosphere is so unstable that a butterfly flapping its wings can, famously, change the course of weather patterns. The celebrated “butterfly effect” also means that the reliability of weather forecasts drops sharply beyond 10 days.

Beyond this, there are strong fluctuations in temperature, with increases tending to be followed by decreases, and vice-versa. The same pattern holds true over months, years and decades. “This natural tendency to return to a basic state is an expression of the atmosphere’s memory that is so strong that we are still feeling the effects of century-old fluctuations,” says McGill physics professor Shaun Lovejoy. “While man-made atmospheric warming imposes an overall increasing trend in temperatures, the natural fluctuations around this trend follow the same long memory pattern.”

McGill physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

In a new paper published online in Geophysical Research Letters, Lovejoy shows how to directly harness the atmosphere’s elephantine memory to produce temperature forecasts that are somewhat more accurate than conventional numerical computer models. This new method, he says, could help improve notoriously poor seasonal forecasts, as well as producing better long-term climate projections.

To take advantage of the butterfly effect, Lovejoy’s approach treats the weather as random and uses historical data to force the forecast to reflect a realistic climate. This allows it to overcome limitations of the standard approach, in which imperfect representations of the weather push a computer model to be consistent with its model climate – rather than with the real climate. The new method also represents an improvement over other statistical forecasting techniques that exploit only the atmosphere’s short-term memory, Lovejoy asserts.

Lovejoy’s paper uses a simple version of his new method to show that the so-called pause in global warming since 1998 can be well explained with the help of historical atmospheric data. He also concludes that this method proves more accurate over this period than the standard computer models used, for example, by the International Panel on Climate Change.

Lovejoy’s model also predicts that if greenhouse gas emissions continue at the post-2000 rate, there is a 97.5 per cent chance that the “pause” in global warming will be over before 2020.

Read the paper online

Related story:

Global warming ‘pause’ reflects natural fluctuation

 

Harnessing the butterfly effect

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 16:23

New method could improve atmospheric forecasts over months, decades, and could explain “pause” in global warming

By Vincent Allaire

The atmosphere is so unstable that a butterfly flapping its wings can, famously, change the course of weather patterns. The celebrated “butterfly effect” also means that the reliability of weather forecasts drops sharply beyond 10 days.

Beyond this, there are strong fluctuations in temperature, with increases tending to be followed by decreases, and vice-versa. The same pattern holds true over months, years and decades. “This natural tendency to return to a basic state is an expression of the atmosphere’s memory that is so strong that we are still feeling the effects of century-old fluctuations,” says McGill physics professor Shaun Lovejoy. “While man-made atmospheric warming imposes an overall increasing trend in temperatures, the natural fluctuations around this trend follow the same long memory pattern.”

McGill physics professor Shaun Lovejoy.

In a new paper published online in Geophysical Research Letters, Lovejoy shows how to directly harness the atmosphere’s elephantine memory to produce temperature forecasts that are somewhat more accurate than conventional numerical computer models. This new method, he says, could help improve notoriously poor seasonal forecasts, as well as producing better long-term climate projections.

To take advantage of the butterfly effect, Lovejoy’s approach treats the weather as random and uses historical data to force the forecast to reflect a realistic climate. This allows it to overcome limitations of the standard approach, in which imperfect representations of the weather push a computer model to be consistent with its model climate – rather than with the real climate. The new method also represents an improvement over other statistical forecasting techniques that exploit only the atmosphere’s short-term memory, Lovejoy asserts.

Lovejoy’s paper uses a simple version of his new method to show that the so-called pause in global warming since 1998 can be well explained with the help of historical atmospheric data. He also concludes that this method proves more accurate over this period than the standard computer models used, for example, by the International Panel on Climate Change.

Lovejoy’s model also predicts that if greenhouse gas emissions continue at the post-2000 rate, there is a 97.5 per cent chance that the “pause” in global warming will be over before 2020.

Read the paper online

Related story:

Global warming ‘pause’ reflects natural fluctuation

 

My summer vacation

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 15:55

With less than a month before the start of the new semester, summer has officially rounded the clubhouse turn. The McGill Reporter wants to see what you did on your vacation. Share your best moments with the McGill community by letting us post your vacation pictures on The Reporter website. Please send your digital photos (high resolution) and caption information (who, what, where) to neale.mcdevitt@mcgill.ca. See last year’s gallery of fun-in-the-sun pictures. or check out the 2013 gallery.

 

 

My summer vacation

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 15:55

With less than a month before the start of the new semester, summer has officially rounded the clubhouse turn. The McGill Reporter wants to see what you did on your vacation. Share your best moments with the McGill community by letting us post your vacation pictures on The Reporter website. Please send your digital photos (high resolution) and caption information (who, what, where) to neale.mcdevitt@mcgill.ca. See last year’s gallery of fun-in-the-sun pictures. or check out the 2013 gallery.

 

 

Gestational diabetes: A diabetes predictor in fathers

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 11:26

By MUHC Public Affairs

Gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy, affects between three and 20 per cent of pregnant women. Those who develop gestational diabetes are seven times as likely to eventually develop type 2 diabetes in the years following pregnancy. Now, in a large study analyzing 20 years of data from Quebec, a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has demonstrated that gestational diabetes signals future diabetes risk not only in mothers, but also in fathers. The study was recently published in Diabetes Care.

“We observed that the incident of diabetes was 33 per cent greater in men whose partner has gestational diabetes compared with men whose partners did not have gestational diabetes,” says the lead author of the study, Dr. Kaberi Dasgupta, endocrinologist at the MUHC and an associate professor of Medicine at McGill. “This is the first study to demonstrate a link between gestational diabetes in mothers and diabetes incidence in fathers.”

Dr. Kaberi Dasgupta

Prior studies have shown partners to be similar in their weight and physical activity. Moreover, Dr. Dasgupta’s team has shown evidence in a study conducted in 2014 that spousal diabetes was a diabetes risk factor. Then the researchers hypothesized that gestational diabetes in mothers signals a possible diabetes incidence in fathers. Gestational diabetes occurs when couples are in young to middle adulthood. Diabetes risk factors in these years are of high importance as they offer an opportunity for long term prevention.

The researchers randomly selected singleton live births from 1990 to 2007 with a positive diagnosis for gestational diabetes in mothers and matched controls without gestational diabetes from health administrative, birth and death registry data from the province of Quebec. Then, they identified fathers with type 2 diabetes from the time of the mother’s post-delivery discharge from the hospital to the father’s departure from Quebec, death or end of the study period (March 31, 2012). Overall, 70,890 fathers were evaluated (half with partners with gestational diabetes).

“Our analysis suggests that couples share risk partly because of their shared social and cultural environment, which may contribute to health behaviours and attitudes,” explains Dr. Dasgupta. “The study reinforces the findings of our previous study on shared risk for diabetes in spouses and prior studies indicating that less healthy eating habits and low physical activity could be shared within a household. Our data suggest that gestational diabetes could be leveraged as a tool to enhance diabetes detection and prevention in fathers.’’

Read the study online

 

Gestational diabetes: A diabetes predictor in fathers

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 08/19/2015 - 11:26

By MUHC Public Affairs

Gestational diabetes, a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy, affects between three and 20 per cent of pregnant women. Those who develop gestational diabetes are seven times as likely to eventually develop type 2 diabetes in the years following pregnancy. Now, in a large study analyzing 20 years of data from Quebec, a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has demonstrated that gestational diabetes signals future diabetes risk not only in mothers, but also in fathers. The study was recently published in Diabetes Care.

“We observed that the incident of diabetes was 33 per cent greater in men whose partner has gestational diabetes compared with men whose partners did not have gestational diabetes,” says the lead author of the study, Dr. Kaberi Dasgupta, endocrinologist at the MUHC and an associate professor of Medicine at McGill. “This is the first study to demonstrate a link between gestational diabetes in mothers and diabetes incidence in fathers.”

Dr. Kaberi Dasgupta

Prior studies have shown partners to be similar in their weight and physical activity. Moreover, Dr. Dasgupta’s team has shown evidence in a study conducted in 2014 that spousal diabetes was a diabetes risk factor. Then the researchers hypothesized that gestational diabetes in mothers signals a possible diabetes incidence in fathers. Gestational diabetes occurs when couples are in young to middle adulthood. Diabetes risk factors in these years are of high importance as they offer an opportunity for long term prevention.

The researchers randomly selected singleton live births from 1990 to 2007 with a positive diagnosis for gestational diabetes in mothers and matched controls without gestational diabetes from health administrative, birth and death registry data from the province of Quebec. Then, they identified fathers with type 2 diabetes from the time of the mother’s post-delivery discharge from the hospital to the father’s departure from Quebec, death or end of the study period (March 31, 2012). Overall, 70,890 fathers were evaluated (half with partners with gestational diabetes).

“Our analysis suggests that couples share risk partly because of their shared social and cultural environment, which may contribute to health behaviours and attitudes,” explains Dr. Dasgupta. “The study reinforces the findings of our previous study on shared risk for diabetes in spouses and prior studies indicating that less healthy eating habits and low physical activity could be shared within a household. Our data suggest that gestational diabetes could be leveraged as a tool to enhance diabetes detection and prevention in fathers.’’

Read the study online

 

McGill students awarded Schulich scholarships

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 08/18/2015 - 13:48

Aditya Mohan (left) and Alexander Deans have earned Schulich Leader Scholarships.

Schulich Leader Scholarships valued at $80,000 and $60,000 per student

Ontario high school students Alexander Deans and Aditya Mohan have been named McGill’s most recent recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships.

Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace the ‘STEM’ fields – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – in their future careers. This year, there were 1,250 Schulich Leader nominees from across Canada vying for 50 new scholarships. Now in its fourth year, 170 students from across the country are Schulich Leader Scholars, and have received $11 million in support.

Alexander Deans, 18, is a recipient of the award valued at $80,000. A graduate of Academie Ste Cecile International School in Windsor, Ontario, he will be entering McGill’s engineering program this fall. Deans was selected for his outstanding academic record as well as accomplishments in youth leadership, sports and music. His extra-curricular achievements include the creation of the ‘iAid’, an revolutionary navigation device for the blind which earned the Gold Medal at the Canada Wide Science Fair and second place worldwide at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair as well as the 2014 “Future Leaders” honour by Maclean’s Magazine.

“I really appreciate receiving a Schulich Leader Scholarship because it recognizes leadership and youth innovation,” says Deans. “I have a passion for innovation and solving real-world problems, and McGill represents the opportunity to challenge myself at one of the world’s best universities.”

Aditya Mohan, 18, is a recipient of the award valued at $60,000. A graduate of Colonel By Secondary School in Ottawa, Mohan will be entering McGill’s microbiology and immunology program this fall. Mohan was selected for his consistent academic excellence as well as his accomplishments in creative arts and international development aid. His extra-curricular research efforts have focused on research into the HIV virus (for which he won the 2014 Manning National Innovation Award and the 2015 Sanofi BioGenius National Challenge), algal biofuels and oncology, exploring the idea of bio- engineering the common cold virus to kill cancer cells. Aditya was recently named a Top 20 Under 20 recipient by Plan Canada.

“The Schulich Leaders Award is a big honour especially when you consider the past recipients,” says Mohan. “It means a lot to be recognized for my efforts in high school and to now have the opportunity to attend McGill.”

“Fostering leadership in STEM fields is vital to Canada’s economic prosperity,” said Seymour Schulich, himself a McGill graduate who has a Bachelor’s degree in Science and was a member of the University’s inaugural MBA graduating class, in 1965. “It is immensely important to invest in the next generation of technology innovators as they develop and hone their minds and skills to contribute to our national and global community. This country has already produced exceptional Schulich Leaders since its founding in 2011. Every year, our mission is to support outstanding students in pursuit of their dreams.”

 

McGill students awarded Schulich scholarships

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 08/18/2015 - 13:48

Aditya Mohan (left) and Alexander Deans have earned Schulich Leader Scholarships.

Schulich Leader Scholarships valued at $80,000 and $60,000 per student

Ontario high school students Alexander Deans and Aditya Mohan have been named McGill’s most recent recipients of the prestigious Schulich Leader Scholarships.

Created in 2011 by Canadian business leader and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, this annual scholarship program encourages promising high school graduates to embrace the ‘STEM’ fields – science, technology, engineering and mathematics – in their future careers. This year, there were 1,250 Schulich Leader nominees from across Canada vying for 50 new scholarships. Now in its fourth year, 170 students from across the country are Schulich Leader Scholars, and have received $11 million in support.

Alexander Deans, 18, is a recipient of the award valued at $80,000. A graduate of Academie Ste Cecile International School in Windsor, Ontario, he will be entering McGill’s engineering program this fall. Deans was selected for his outstanding academic record as well as accomplishments in youth leadership, sports and music. His extra-curricular achievements include the creation of the ‘iAid’, an revolutionary navigation device for the blind which earned the Gold Medal at the Canada Wide Science Fair and second place worldwide at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair as well as the 2014 “Future Leaders” honour by Maclean’s Magazine.

“I really appreciate receiving a Schulich Leader Scholarship because it recognizes leadership and youth innovation,” says Deans. “I have a passion for innovation and solving real-world problems, and McGill represents the opportunity to challenge myself at one of the world’s best universities.”

Aditya Mohan, 18, is a recipient of the award valued at $60,000. A graduate of Colonel By Secondary School in Ottawa, Mohan will be entering McGill’s microbiology and immunology program this fall. Mohan was selected for his consistent academic excellence as well as his accomplishments in creative arts and international development aid. His extra-curricular research efforts have focused on research into the HIV virus (for which he won the 2014 Manning National Innovation Award and the 2015 Sanofi BioGenius National Challenge), algal biofuels and oncology, exploring the idea of bio- engineering the common cold virus to kill cancer cells. Aditya was recently named a Top 20 Under 20 recipient by Plan Canada.

“The Schulich Leaders Award is a big honour especially when you consider the past recipients,” says Mohan. “It means a lot to be recognized for my efforts in high school and to now have the opportunity to attend McGill.”

“Fostering leadership in STEM fields is vital to Canada’s economic prosperity,” said Seymour Schulich, himself a McGill graduate who has a Bachelor’s degree in Science and was a member of the University’s inaugural MBA graduating class, in 1965. “It is immensely important to invest in the next generation of technology innovators as they develop and hone their minds and skills to contribute to our national and global community. This country has already produced exceptional Schulich Leaders since its founding in 2011. Every year, our mission is to support outstanding students in pursuit of their dreams.”

 

University St. to be closed all weekend

«McGill Reporter» - Fri, 08/14/2015 - 14:50

The City of Montreal announced on Friday, Aug. 14, that University St. would be closed from Sherbrooke St. to Pine Ave., including the bike path, from Friday afternoon at 3 p.m. until Monday morning.

The closure is to allow the Ville-Marie Borough to perform work on University St. near the Rutherford Physics Building.

The work will also affect the water supplies to the following McGill buildings: Wong Building; 3534 University; Birks; Residence Buildings.

We will do our best to keep you updated through the weekend.

 

University St. to be closed all weekend

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Fri, 08/14/2015 - 14:50

The City of Montreal announced on Friday, Aug. 14, that University St. would be closed from Sherbrooke St. to Pine Ave., including the bike path, from Friday afternoon at 3 p.m. until Monday morning.

The closure is to allow the Ville-Marie Borough to perform work on University St. near the Rutherford Physics Building.

The work will also affect the water supplies to the following McGill buildings: Wong Building; 3534 University; Birks; Residence Buildings.

We will do our best to keep you updated through the weekend.

 

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