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McGill actively moving toward better asset management

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 08:11

By Stephanie Leclerc

McGill has set-up an interdisciplinary group of managers and administrators to develop and implement an institutional framework and system for sound asset management. The team, which includes professionals from IT Services, Financial Services, Procurement Services, University Services and the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research and Innovation) has already been reaching out to hundreds of community members within research units, faculties and administrative units to discuss current practices and identify the best way forward.

“This is a compliance and stewardship project” explains Mrs. Christiane Tinmouth, the University’s Associate Vice-Principal, Financial Services, “and we already foresee multiple practical advantages to having a clear and streamlined process for asset management and adopting best practices”, she adds. Dr. Nathalie Foisset, Associate Director – Strategic Initiatives, Office of the V-P (Research and Innovation), agrees. “Having a proper inventory which allows us to know which research equipment is available at McGill, tracking its whereabouts, optimizing the lifecycle management of our assets and facilitating decommissioning processes are just some of the advantages we are aiming for.”

Over the last few months, a team scouted both campuses to find out how assets were currently managed, and found wide discrepancies across areas. Matt Koch, IT Project Manager, explains: “Some departments have a good control of their assets, but others lack even basic information about what they have under their jurisdiction.” As part of the tour, the team found that McGill departments were very happy and eager to participate in better asset management. “Our role, as a team, will be to set the parameters, taking account of governmental and granting agency requirements, and provide the necessary tools so that proper asset management can be rolled out as efficiently as possible.”

“An IT Asset Management Regulation, which governs the lifecycle management of University IT assets has already been adopted and gradually rolled-out”, confirms Koch. This was a priority due to a Quebec law passed a few years ago, which made the University accountable for ensuring the longevity of its IT resources. “Now,” says Koch, “we are looking at research equipment, vehicles and so on, and identifying options for facilitating their inventorying and tracking.”

“From a sustainability perspective, this is a great move forward,” says François Miller, McGill’s Sustainability Director. “With proper asset management, we will be able to greatly improve application of the University’s 4-R hierarchy (Rethink, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) for a series of different goods, materials and equipment. The IT Asset Management Regulation already generated savings and environmental benefits by facilitating IT reuse across departments. I’m sure we can do this for other assets as well.”

McGill actively moving toward better asset management

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 07/13/2016 - 08:11

By Stephanie Leclerc

McGill has set-up an interdisciplinary group of managers and administrators to develop and implement an institutional framework and system for sound asset management. The team, which includes professionals from IT Services, Financial Services, Procurement Services, University Services and the Office of the Vice-Principal (Research and Innovation) has already been reaching out to hundreds of community members within research units, faculties and administrative units to discuss current practices and identify the best way forward.

“This is a compliance and stewardship project” explains Mrs. Christiane Tinmouth, the University’s Associate Vice-Principal, Financial Services, “and we already foresee multiple practical advantages to having a clear and streamlined process for asset management and adopting best practices”, she adds. Dr. Nathalie Foisset, Associate Director – Strategic Initiatives, Office of the V-P (Research and Innovation), agrees. “Having a proper inventory which allows us to know which research equipment is available at McGill, tracking its whereabouts, optimizing the lifecycle management of our assets and facilitating decommissioning processes are just some of the advantages we are aiming for.”

Over the last few months, a team scouted both campuses to find out how assets were currently managed, and found wide discrepancies across areas. Matt Koch, IT Project Manager, explains: “Some departments have a good control of their assets, but others lack even basic information about what they have under their jurisdiction.” As part of the tour, the team found that McGill departments were very happy and eager to participate in better asset management. “Our role, as a team, will be to set the parameters, taking account of governmental and granting agency requirements, and provide the necessary tools so that proper asset management can be rolled out as efficiently as possible.”

“An IT Asset Management Regulation, which governs the lifecycle management of University IT assets has already been adopted and gradually rolled-out”, confirms Koch. This was a priority due to a Quebec law passed a few years ago, which made the University accountable for ensuring the longevity of its IT resources. “Now,” says Koch, “we are looking at research equipment, vehicles and so on, and identifying options for facilitating their inventorying and tracking.”

“From a sustainability perspective, this is a great move forward,” says François Miller, McGill’s Sustainability Director. “With proper asset management, we will be able to greatly improve application of the University’s 4-R hierarchy (Rethink, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle) for a series of different goods, materials and equipment. The IT Asset Management Regulation already generated savings and environmental benefits by facilitating IT reuse across departments. I’m sure we can do this for other assets as well.”

Have fun in the sun but beat the heat

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 10:18

While the long hot days of summer are wonderful, they can also bring on heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke, exhaustion and dehydration. During the summer months heat can get extreme in certain workplaces, particularly where there is heat-generating equipment.

Each summer MUHC emergency departments see some patients suffering from various heat-related problems. These include anything from mild dehydration, nausea, malaise and fatigue to the rare, but more serious, heat stroke.

Early symptoms of heat stroke include fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and malaise. During the onset of a heat wave, these should be seen as early warning signs.

If you think you are suffering from heat-related illness the MUHC offers the following advice:

  • Stop, seek shelter or a cool place, rest and hydrate yourself (drink water)
  • Elderly people should avoid going out during extreme heat periods, especially if they are on medications such as water pills
  • Drink plenty of cool water, even before you feel thirsty, unless contraindicated
  • Limit alcohol intake
  • If it is possible, use a fan to create air movement
  • Use blinds, shades to filter direct sunlight
  • Wear lightweight clothing preferably in cotton to allow sweat evaporation
  • Take your breaks in the shade

Everyone should take precautions during heat or extreme heat episodes, but some people are more at risk than others, namely:

  • Elderly people
  • People suffering from chronic diseases such as diabetes or cardiovascular, respiratory or neurological diseases; and
  • 0- to 4-year-old children.

Oppressive heat

Environment Canada issues “heat alerts” when the temperature reaches 30 °C and the humidex (temperature and humidity combined into one number to reflect the perceived temperature) reaches 40. The main effect of heat on the population is discomfort.

Extreme heat

The term “extreme heat” has been defined by public health authorities to plan for heat events as a means of foreseeing heat episodes that are likely to have an impact on the health of vulnerable individuals. In Montréal, an “extreme heat” episode is defined as three consecutive days when the average maximum temperature reaches 33 °C and the average minimum temperature does not drop below 20 °C, or when the temperature does not drop below 25 °C for two consecutive nights. Environment Canada does not issue extreme heat alerts, but its weather forecasts are used to anticipate situations which could cause health problems.

 

 

Have fun in the sun but beat the heat

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 10:18

While the long hot days of summer are wonderful, they can also bring on heat-related illnesses such as heat stroke, exhaustion and dehydration. During the summer months heat can get extreme in certain workplaces, particularly where there is heat-generating equipment.

Each summer MUHC emergency departments see some patients suffering from various heat-related problems. These include anything from mild dehydration, nausea, malaise and fatigue to the rare, but more serious, heat stroke.

Early symptoms of heat stroke include fatigue, difficulty concentrating, and malaise. During the onset of a heat wave, these should be seen as early warning signs.

If you think you are suffering from heat-related illness the MUHC offers the following advice:

  • Stop, seek shelter or a cool place, rest and hydrate yourself (drink water)
  • Elderly people should avoid going out during extreme heat periods, especially if they are on medications such as water pills
  • Drink plenty of cool water, even before you feel thirsty, unless contraindicated
  • Limit alcohol intake
  • If it is possible, use a fan to create air movement
  • Use blinds, shades to filter direct sunlight
  • Wear lightweight clothing preferably in cotton to allow sweat evaporation
  • Take your breaks in the shade

Everyone should take precautions during heat or extreme heat episodes, but some people are more at risk than others, namely:

  • Elderly people
  • People suffering from chronic diseases such as diabetes or cardiovascular, respiratory or neurological diseases; and
  • 0- to 4-year-old children.

Oppressive heat

Environment Canada issues “heat alerts” when the temperature reaches 30 °C and the humidex (temperature and humidity combined into one number to reflect the perceived temperature) reaches 40. The main effect of heat on the population is discomfort.

Extreme heat

The term “extreme heat” has been defined by public health authorities to plan for heat events as a means of foreseeing heat episodes that are likely to have an impact on the health of vulnerable individuals. In Montréal, an “extreme heat” episode is defined as three consecutive days when the average maximum temperature reaches 33 °C and the average minimum temperature does not drop below 20 °C, or when the temperature does not drop below 25 °C for two consecutive nights. Environment Canada does not issue extreme heat alerts, but its weather forecasts are used to anticipate situations which could cause health problems.

 

 

“Big Data” study discovers earliest sign of Alzheimer’s

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 10:00

According to the World Health Organization, Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting more than 30 million people worldwide in 2015.

Research underlines importance of computational power in future neurological breakthroughs

By Shawn Hayward

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital have used a powerful tool to better understand the progression of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), identifying its first physiological signs.

Led by Dr. Alan Evans, a professor of neurology, neurosurgery and biomedical engineering at the Neuro, the researchers analyzed more than 7,700 brain images from 1,171 people in various stages of Alzheimer’s progression using a variety of techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Blood and cerebrospinal fluid were also analyzed, as well as the subjects’ level of cognition.

The researchers found that, contrary to previous understanding, the first physiological sign of Alzheimer’s disease is a decrease in blood flow in the brain. An increase in amyloid protein was considered to be the first detectable sign of Alzheimer’s. While amyloid certainly plays a role, this study finds that changes in blood flow are the earliest known warning sign of Alzheimer’s. The study also found that changes in cognition begin earlier in the progression than previously believed.

Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease is an incredibly complex disease but an equally important one to understand. It is not caused by any one neurological mechanism but is a result of several associated mechanisms in the brain. LOAD is the most common cause of human dementia and an understanding of the interactions between its various mechanisms is important to develop treatments.

Previous research on the many mechanisms that make up LOAD has been limited in scope and did not provide a complete picture of this complex disease. This study, published in the journal Nature Communications on June 21, factored in the pattern of amyloid concentration, glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, functional activity and brain atrophy in 78 regions of the brain, covering all grey matter.

“The lack of an integrative understanding of LOAD pathology, its multifactorial mechanisms, is a crucial obstacle for the development of effective, disease-modifying therapeutic agents,” says Yasser Iturria Medina, a post-doctoral fellow at the MNI and the paper’s first author.

The trajectory of each biological factor was recorded using data from each patient taken over a 30-year period. This process was then repeated 500 times to improve robustness of estimations and stability of the results.

Compiling and analyzing the data took thousands of compute hours to complete, and could not have been possible without sophisticated software and terabytes of hard drive space. Such a data-driven approach to neurology is becoming increasingly important, according to Evans.

“We have many ways to capture data about the brain, but what are you supposed to do with all this data?” he says. “Increasingly, neurology is limited by the ability to take all this information together and make sense of it. This creates complex mathematical and statistical challenges but that’s where the future of clinical research in the brain lies.”

This research also underlines the importance of data sharing across institutions, known as the Open Science model. Patient data for the study came from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a partnership of more than 30 institutions across Canada and the United States. The knowledge that this study has added to our understanding of LOAD would still be undiscovered had it not been for data sharing. Evans points out that his is just one of hundreds of scientific papers to come from the ADNI dataset.

“That by itself is justification for ADNI and data sharing,” he says. “What goes around comes around. We benefit from the data put in by others, and we contribute our own data.”

While this study is one of the most thorough ever published on the subject of Alzheimer’s disease progression, Evans says he would like to go further, to not only record but determine the causes of each mechanism, which could be the key to unlocking better treatments. It is something that is limited only by how much computer power Big Data can provide.

“This is a computational, mathematical challenge that goes beyond anything we’ve done so far,” says Evans. “Our goal is to go to a high-level, causal modeling of the interactions amongst all of the factors of disease, but you need huge computational power to do that. It’s our job to be ready with the software, the algorithms, and the data while we wait for the hardware to appear.”

“We still need more data-driven integrative studies, capable of considering all possible biological factors involved, as well as of clarifying the direct interactions among these factors,” says Medina. “Without that, we cannot dream of effective treatments. We would continue to work in the dark.”

Read the study online

 

“Big Data” study discovers earliest sign of Alzheimer’s

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 10:00

According to the World Health Organization, Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting more than 30 million people worldwide in 2015.

Research underlines importance of computational power in future neurological breakthroughs

By Shawn Hayward

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital have used a powerful tool to better understand the progression of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD), identifying its first physiological signs.

Led by Dr. Alan Evans, a professor of neurology, neurosurgery and biomedical engineering at the Neuro, the researchers analyzed more than 7,700 brain images from 1,171 people in various stages of Alzheimer’s progression using a variety of techniques including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). Blood and cerebrospinal fluid were also analyzed, as well as the subjects’ level of cognition.

The researchers found that, contrary to previous understanding, the first physiological sign of Alzheimer’s disease is a decrease in blood flow in the brain. An increase in amyloid protein was considered to be the first detectable sign of Alzheimer’s. While amyloid certainly plays a role, this study finds that changes in blood flow are the earliest known warning sign of Alzheimer’s. The study also found that changes in cognition begin earlier in the progression than previously believed.

Late-onset Alzheimer’s disease is an incredibly complex disease but an equally important one to understand. It is not caused by any one neurological mechanism but is a result of several associated mechanisms in the brain. LOAD is the most common cause of human dementia and an understanding of the interactions between its various mechanisms is important to develop treatments.

Previous research on the many mechanisms that make up LOAD has been limited in scope and did not provide a complete picture of this complex disease. This study, published in the journal Nature Communications on June 21, factored in the pattern of amyloid concentration, glucose metabolism, cerebral blood flow, functional activity and brain atrophy in 78 regions of the brain, covering all grey matter.

“The lack of an integrative understanding of LOAD pathology, its multifactorial mechanisms, is a crucial obstacle for the development of effective, disease-modifying therapeutic agents,” says Yasser Iturria Medina, a post-doctoral fellow at the MNI and the paper’s first author.

The trajectory of each biological factor was recorded using data from each patient taken over a 30-year period. This process was then repeated 500 times to improve robustness of estimations and stability of the results.

Compiling and analyzing the data took thousands of compute hours to complete, and could not have been possible without sophisticated software and terabytes of hard drive space. Such a data-driven approach to neurology is becoming increasingly important, according to Evans.

“We have many ways to capture data about the brain, but what are you supposed to do with all this data?” he says. “Increasingly, neurology is limited by the ability to take all this information together and make sense of it. This creates complex mathematical and statistical challenges but that’s where the future of clinical research in the brain lies.”

This research also underlines the importance of data sharing across institutions, known as the Open Science model. Patient data for the study came from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), a partnership of more than 30 institutions across Canada and the United States. The knowledge that this study has added to our understanding of LOAD would still be undiscovered had it not been for data sharing. Evans points out that his is just one of hundreds of scientific papers to come from the ADNI dataset.

“That by itself is justification for ADNI and data sharing,” he says. “What goes around comes around. We benefit from the data put in by others, and we contribute our own data.”

While this study is one of the most thorough ever published on the subject of Alzheimer’s disease progression, Evans says he would like to go further, to not only record but determine the causes of each mechanism, which could be the key to unlocking better treatments. It is something that is limited only by how much computer power Big Data can provide.

“This is a computational, mathematical challenge that goes beyond anything we’ve done so far,” says Evans. “Our goal is to go to a high-level, causal modeling of the interactions amongst all of the factors of disease, but you need huge computational power to do that. It’s our job to be ready with the software, the algorithms, and the data while we wait for the hardware to appear.”

“We still need more data-driven integrative studies, capable of considering all possible biological factors involved, as well as of clarifying the direct interactions among these factors,” says Medina. “Without that, we cannot dream of effective treatments. We would continue to work in the dark.”

Read the study online

 

Les mégadonnées et l’émergence de l’Alzheimer

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 09:49

L’étude fait ressortir l’importance de la puissance de calcul pour les futures percées neurologiques

Par Shawn Hayward

Des chercheurs de l’Institut et hôpital neurologiques de Montréal ont eu recours à un puissant outil pour mieux comprendre la progression de la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive et ont identifié ses premiers signes physiologiques.

Sous la direction d’Alan Evans, professeur de neurologie, de neurochirurgie et de génie biomédical au Neuro, les chercheurs ont analysé plus de 7 700 images du cerveau de 1 171 personnes à différents stades de progression de la maladie d’Alzheimer, obtenues à l’aide de diverses techniques, dont la résonance magnétique (IRM) et la tomographie par émission de positons (TEP). Ils ont aussi analysé des échantillons de sang et de liquide cérébrospinal, ainsi que le niveau de cognition des sujets.

Les chercheurs ont constaté que le premier signe physiologique de la maladie d’Alzheimer est une diminution de l’apport de sang au cerveau, contrairement aux connaissances antérieures selon lesquelles une augmentation des protéines amyloïdes était le signe initial décelable. Bien que le rôle des protéines amyloïdes soit indéniable, l’étude montre que des changements dans l’irrigation sanguine sont le tout premier signe avant-coureur de l’alzheimer. D’après l’étude, les changements dans la cognition s’amorcent plus tôt qu’on le pensait dans la progression.

La maladie d’Alzheimer tardive est très complexe, mais importante à comprendre. Elle ne résulte pas d’un seul mécanisme neurologique, mais bien de plusieurs mécanismes associés dans le cerveau. Comme il s’agit de la cause la plus répandue de démence chez l’humain, il est crucial de percer les interactions entre ses mécanismes afin de mettre au point des traitements.

Les recherches antérieures sur les mécanismes contribuant à la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive avaient une portée limitée et en donnaient un portrait incomplet. La présente étude, publiée dans Nature Communications le 21 juin, tenait compte des caractéristiques de la concentration d’amyloïdes, du métabolisme du glucose, du débit sanguin cérébral, de l’activité fonctionnelle et de l’atrophie cérébrale dans 78 régions du cerveau, couvrant l’entièreté de la matière grise.

« L’absence d’une compréhension intégrative de la pathologie de la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive, de ses mécanismes multifactoriels, est un obstacle crucial au développement d’agents thérapeutiques efficaces pouvant modifier l’évolution de la maladie », indique Yasser Iturria Medina, boursier postdoctoral à l’INM et premier auteur de l’article.

La trajectoire de chaque facteur biologique a été enregistrée à l’aide des données de chaque patient sur une période de 30 ans. Ce processus a ensuite été reproduit 500 fois pour améliorer la robustesse des estimations et la stabilité des résultats.

La compilation et l’analyse des données ont exigé des milliers d’heures et n’auraient pu être possibles sans un logiciel très perfectionné et des téraoctets d’espace sur disque dur. Une telle approche guidée par des données à la neurologie devient de plus en plus importante, selon le Pr Evans. « Nous disposons de nombreuses façons d’acquérir des données concernant le cerveau, mais que faire de toutes ces données? La neurologie continue d’être limitée par notre capacité à donner un sens à l’abondance de données recueillies. Les défis mathématiques et statistiques qui en résultent sont complexes, mais c’est là où réside l’avenir de la recherche clinique sur le cerveau », dit-il.

Cette étude accentue aussi l’importance du partage de données entre établissements, c’est-à-dire le modèle de science ouverte. Les données des patients pour l’étude provenaient de l’ADNI (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative), un partenariat regroupant plus de 30 établissements du Canada et des États-Unis. Sans le partage de données, les connaissances que cette étude ajoute à notre compréhension de la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive seraient encore inconnues. Le Pr Evans signale que son article scientifique n’est qu’un parmi des centaines à se fonder sur l’ensemble de données de l’ADNI.

« En soi, cela justifie l’ADNI et le partage de données. Rien ne se perd, tout se transforme. Nous tirons parti de données acquises par d’autres et nous les enrichissons des nôtres », souligne-t-il.

Bien que l’étude soit l’une des plus complètes à avoir été publiée à ce jour sur la progression de la maladie d’Alzheimer, le Pr Evans aimerait pouvoir approfondir le sujet, non seulement pour enregistrer, mais aussi déterminer les causes de chaque mécanisme. L’exercice pourrait ouvrir la voie à de meilleurs traitements. Il n’est limité que par la quantité de pouvoir informatique que les mégadonnées peuvent fournir.

Pour le Pr Evans, il s’agit « d’un défi mathématique et informatique qui va au-delà de tout ce que nous avons réalisé jusqu’ici. Notre but est de réaliser une modélisation causale de haut niveau des interactions entre tous les facteurs de la maladie, ce qui exige une énorme puissance de calcul. À nous d’être prêts avec le logiciel, les algorithmes et les données en attendant l’arrivée du matériel de pointe indispensable ».

« Il nous faut encore plus d’études synthèses guidées par des données, susceptibles de tenir compte de tous les facteurs biologiques possibles en cause, de même que de tirer au clair les interactions directes entre ces facteurs », ajoute M. Medina. « À défaut de quoi, nous ne pouvons rêver de traitements efficaces. Nous continuerions de travailler à l’aveuglette. »

Les mégadonnées et l’émergence de l’Alzheimer

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 09:49

L’étude fait ressortir l’importance de la puissance de calcul pour les futures percées neurologiques

Par Shawn Hayward

Des chercheurs de l’Institut et hôpital neurologiques de Montréal ont eu recours à un puissant outil pour mieux comprendre la progression de la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive et ont identifié ses premiers signes physiologiques.

Sous la direction d’Alan Evans, professeur de neurologie, de neurochirurgie et de génie biomédical au Neuro, les chercheurs ont analysé plus de 7 700 images du cerveau de 1 171 personnes à différents stades de progression de la maladie d’Alzheimer, obtenues à l’aide de diverses techniques, dont la résonance magnétique (IRM) et la tomographie par émission de positons (TEP). Ils ont aussi analysé des échantillons de sang et de liquide cérébrospinal, ainsi que le niveau de cognition des sujets.

Les chercheurs ont constaté que le premier signe physiologique de la maladie d’Alzheimer est une diminution de l’apport de sang au cerveau, contrairement aux connaissances antérieures selon lesquelles une augmentation des protéines amyloïdes était le signe initial décelable. Bien que le rôle des protéines amyloïdes soit indéniable, l’étude montre que des changements dans l’irrigation sanguine sont le tout premier signe avant-coureur de l’alzheimer. D’après l’étude, les changements dans la cognition s’amorcent plus tôt qu’on le pensait dans la progression.

La maladie d’Alzheimer tardive est très complexe, mais importante à comprendre. Elle ne résulte pas d’un seul mécanisme neurologique, mais bien de plusieurs mécanismes associés dans le cerveau. Comme il s’agit de la cause la plus répandue de démence chez l’humain, il est crucial de percer les interactions entre ses mécanismes afin de mettre au point des traitements.

Les recherches antérieures sur les mécanismes contribuant à la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive avaient une portée limitée et en donnaient un portrait incomplet. La présente étude, publiée dans Nature Communications le 21 juin, tenait compte des caractéristiques de la concentration d’amyloïdes, du métabolisme du glucose, du débit sanguin cérébral, de l’activité fonctionnelle et de l’atrophie cérébrale dans 78 régions du cerveau, couvrant l’entièreté de la matière grise.

« L’absence d’une compréhension intégrative de la pathologie de la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive, de ses mécanismes multifactoriels, est un obstacle crucial au développement d’agents thérapeutiques efficaces pouvant modifier l’évolution de la maladie », indique Yasser Iturria Medina, boursier postdoctoral à l’INM et premier auteur de l’article.

La trajectoire de chaque facteur biologique a été enregistrée à l’aide des données de chaque patient sur une période de 30 ans. Ce processus a ensuite été reproduit 500 fois pour améliorer la robustesse des estimations et la stabilité des résultats.

La compilation et l’analyse des données ont exigé des milliers d’heures et n’auraient pu être possibles sans un logiciel très perfectionné et des téraoctets d’espace sur disque dur. Une telle approche guidée par des données à la neurologie devient de plus en plus importante, selon le Pr Evans. « Nous disposons de nombreuses façons d’acquérir des données concernant le cerveau, mais que faire de toutes ces données? La neurologie continue d’être limitée par notre capacité à donner un sens à l’abondance de données recueillies. Les défis mathématiques et statistiques qui en résultent sont complexes, mais c’est là où réside l’avenir de la recherche clinique sur le cerveau », dit-il.

Cette étude accentue aussi l’importance du partage de données entre établissements, c’est-à-dire le modèle de science ouverte. Les données des patients pour l’étude provenaient de l’ADNI (Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative), un partenariat regroupant plus de 30 établissements du Canada et des États-Unis. Sans le partage de données, les connaissances que cette étude ajoute à notre compréhension de la maladie d’Alzheimer tardive seraient encore inconnues. Le Pr Evans signale que son article scientifique n’est qu’un parmi des centaines à se fonder sur l’ensemble de données de l’ADNI.

« En soi, cela justifie l’ADNI et le partage de données. Rien ne se perd, tout se transforme. Nous tirons parti de données acquises par d’autres et nous les enrichissons des nôtres », souligne-t-il.

Bien que l’étude soit l’une des plus complètes à avoir été publiée à ce jour sur la progression de la maladie d’Alzheimer, le Pr Evans aimerait pouvoir approfondir le sujet, non seulement pour enregistrer, mais aussi déterminer les causes de chaque mécanisme. L’exercice pourrait ouvrir la voie à de meilleurs traitements. Il n’est limité que par la quantité de pouvoir informatique que les mégadonnées peuvent fournir.

Pour le Pr Evans, il s’agit « d’un défi mathématique et informatique qui va au-delà de tout ce que nous avons réalisé jusqu’ici. Notre but est de réaliser une modélisation causale de haut niveau des interactions entre tous les facteurs de la maladie, ce qui exige une énorme puissance de calcul. À nous d’être prêts avec le logiciel, les algorithmes et les données en attendant l’arrivée du matériel de pointe indispensable ».

« Il nous faut encore plus d’études synthèses guidées par des données, susceptibles de tenir compte de tous les facteurs biologiques possibles en cause, de même que de tirer au clair les interactions directes entre ces facteurs », ajoute M. Medina. « À défaut de quoi, nous ne pouvons rêver de traitements efficaces. Nous continuerions de travailler à l’aveuglette. »

William Shatner: Living long and prospering

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 09:26

William Shatner makes a point at the recent alumni breakfast. / Photo: Owen Egan

By Andrew Mahon

Shuttling craftily between gigs in his native Montreal, William Shatner was transported to a McGill breakfast with alumni last Saturday morning with more than 250 graduates and friends, all eager to ‘cling on’ to his reminiscences about life, acting, Star Trek, his formative years at McGill, and the lost art of garlic spare ribs.

Although most assume his preferred mode of transportation is a Federation starship, Shatner arrived at the event (at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts) in a black Lincoln Navigator travelling at a decidedly sub-light speed. Once ensconced in the Captain’s chair on stage, Shatner charmed a rapt audience over the course a brisk 60-minute interview with local radio host Terry DiMonte, first setting the record straight about his unparalleled academic achievement and unique study habits.

“I was the single worst student at McGill,” said Shatner. “I enjoyed school, I just didn’t go to class”

Instead Shatner was drawn to McGill’s extra-curricular thespian activities. He immersed himself in the university’s Red and White Revue theatrical productions while studying for his Bachelor of Commerce degree, something he says he achieved through “osmosis” – once he learned what the word ‘osmosis’ meant. While he missed his own convocation due to a minor academic technicality (he failed a math course), he returned to McGill in 2011 to receive an honorary doctorate.

“They rang me and said would you accept a doctorate,” he recalled. “I said ‘sure’.”

In many ways, Shatner’s remarkable career was the result of a series of accidents starting while he was at working in summer theatre in Montreal after graduating from McGill.

“By accident I went to Stratford,” he said. “Then, by accident, I went to New York for a limited run of the play ‘Tamburlaine’, then I started playing roles in live television in New York. Then Hollywood noticed me and cast me in the movie of ‘The Brothers Karamazov’.”

From there, Shatner’s journey took him where one man had gone before.

The Star Trek pilot had already been made with another actor (Jeffrey Hunter) cast as the lead. When that pilot failed, Star Trek producer and creator, Gene Roddenberry, decided to re-work the show and the search was on for someone to become Captain James T. Kirk 2.0.

“Roddenberry (‘a wonderful creative mind but rather chaotic’) calls me and says we’re recasting. Would you come to Hollywood and look at the pilot?” said Shatner. Shatner said he loved the show and was happy to lead the USS Enterprise on its five-year mission. Unfortunately the cruel vagaries of network television shortened the mission to just three years after which the actors dispersed, never imagining how the show would thrive in conventions, spin-offs and movies.

The rest is earth history. Apart from those few people who are unfamiliar with Star Trek and still think the Captain’s Log is some kind of wood product, the franchise has lived long and prospered thanks to the show’s legion of fans (including many McGillians).

“You’re here this morning because of Star Trek and that was 50 years ago,” said Shatner whose impressive CV includes numerous acting, directing, producing, writing and album recording credits, as well as a current one-man show entitled ‘Shatner’s World: We just live in it’.

The far-reaching and profound impact of the show still astounds Shatner who recounted the story of a documentary he wanted to make based on interviews with all the actors who played Star Trek captains. Lacking the $250,000 travel budget to make the film, Shatner called up Bombardier’s president of business aircraft and asked for his help. Before you could say ‘dilithium crystals’, Bombardier agreed to loan him an aircraft. Shatner later found out that the president volunteered his help (and aircraft) because he had been inspired by Star Trek to become an aeronautical engineer and pursue a career at Bombardier.

In a rare serious moment, Shatner mused about the transient nature of an acting career and the rarity of true friendships in Hollywood.

“Actors form a friendship based on mutual need. I spent five years with James Spader [on the popular TV series Boston Legal which ended in 2008],” said Shatner. “I haven’t heard from him since.”

Talk of friendships inevitably leads to his complicated relationship with Star Trek co-star Leonard Nimoy who died in 2015 and is the subject of a recent memoir by Shatner entitled, ‘Leonard: My Fifty-Year Friendship with a Remarkable Man’.

“He was a Jewish guy from Boston, I was a Jewish guy from Montreal,” said Shatner. “We shared so many similarities and had so much in common.”

Now 85, Shatner says he’s not interested in slowing down or ending his demanding work schedule. His Saturday alone entailed a press conference with Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre (“with all the reconstruction going on in the city, I asked him he was considering cosmetic surgery. He didn’t laugh”) and an appearance at Montreal’s ComicCon (“a lot of bizarre people are there. It’s an opportunity to express themselves”).

Last, but not least, Shatner, opined on some of his favourite Montreal experiences: dinner with his older sister at a Chinese restaurant, bagels, smoked meat, and garlic spare ribs which he used to enjoy with his family every Sunday night at Ruby Foo’s.

“You can’t get them anywhere else,” he said. “It’s a lost art.”

 

 

William Shatner: Living long and prospering

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 09:26

William Shatner makes a point at the recent alumni breakfast. / Photo: Owen Egan

By Andrew Mahon

Shuttling craftily between gigs in his native Montreal, William Shatner was transported to a McGill breakfast with alumni last Saturday morning with more than 250 graduates and friends, all eager to ‘cling on’ to his reminiscences about life, acting, Star Trek, his formative years at McGill, and the lost art of garlic spare ribs.

Although most assume his preferred mode of transportation is a Federation starship, Shatner arrived at the event (at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts) in a black Lincoln Navigator travelling at a decidedly sub-light speed. Once ensconced in the Captain’s chair on stage, Shatner charmed a rapt audience over the course a brisk 60-minute interview with local radio host Terry DiMonte, first setting the record straight about his unparalleled academic achievement and unique study habits.

“I was the single worst student at McGill,” said Shatner. “I enjoyed school, I just didn’t go to class”

Instead Shatner was drawn to McGill’s extra-curricular thespian activities. He immersed himself in the university’s Red and White Revue theatrical productions while studying for his Bachelor of Commerce degree, something he says he achieved through “osmosis” – once he learned what the word ‘osmosis’ meant. While he missed his own convocation due to a minor academic technicality (he failed a math course), he returned to McGill in 2011 to receive an honorary doctorate.

“They rang me and said would you accept a doctorate,” he recalled. “I said ‘sure’.”

In many ways, Shatner’s remarkable career was the result of a series of accidents starting while he was at working in summer theatre in Montreal after graduating from McGill.

“By accident I went to Stratford,” he said. “Then, by accident, I went to New York for a limited run of the play ‘Tamburlaine’, then I started playing roles in live television in New York. Then Hollywood noticed me and cast me in the movie of ‘The Brothers Karamazov’.”

From there, Shatner’s journey took him where one man had gone before.

The Star Trek pilot had already been made with another actor (Jeffrey Hunter) cast as the lead. When that pilot failed, Star Trek producer and creator, Gene Roddenberry, decided to re-work the show and the search was on for someone to become Captain James T. Kirk 2.0.

“Roddenberry (‘a wonderful creative mind but rather chaotic’) calls me and says we’re recasting. Would you come to Hollywood and look at the pilot?” said Shatner. Shatner said he loved the show and was happy to lead the USS Enterprise on its five-year mission. Unfortunately the cruel vagaries of network television shortened the mission to just three years after which the actors dispersed, never imagining how the show would thrive in conventions, spin-offs and movies.

The rest is earth history. Apart from those few people who are unfamiliar with Star Trek and still think the Captain’s Log is some kind of wood product, the franchise has lived long and prospered thanks to the show’s legion of fans (including many McGillians).

“You’re here this morning because of Star Trek and that was 50 years ago,” said Shatner whose impressive CV includes numerous acting, directing, producing, writing and album recording credits, as well as a current one-man show entitled ‘Shatner’s World: We just live in it’.

The far-reaching and profound impact of the show still astounds Shatner who recounted the story of a documentary he wanted to make based on interviews with all the actors who played Star Trek captains. Lacking the $250,000 travel budget to make the film, Shatner called up Bombardier’s president of business aircraft and asked for his help. Before you could say ‘dilithium crystals’, Bombardier agreed to loan him an aircraft. Shatner later found out that the president volunteered his help (and aircraft) because he had been inspired by Star Trek to become an aeronautical engineer and pursue a career at Bombardier.

In a rare serious moment, Shatner mused about the transient nature of an acting career and the rarity of true friendships in Hollywood.

“Actors form a friendship based on mutual need. I spent five years with James Spader [on the popular TV series Boston Legal which ended in 2008],” said Shatner. “I haven’t heard from him since.”

Talk of friendships inevitably leads to his complicated relationship with Star Trek co-star Leonard Nimoy who died in 2015 and is the subject of a recent memoir by Shatner entitled, ‘Leonard: My Fifty-Year Friendship with a Remarkable Man’.

“He was a Jewish guy from Boston, I was a Jewish guy from Montreal,” said Shatner. “We shared so many similarities and had so much in common.”

Now 85, Shatner says he’s not interested in slowing down or ending his demanding work schedule. His Saturday alone entailed a press conference with Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre (“with all the reconstruction going on in the city, I asked him he was considering cosmetic surgery. He didn’t laugh”) and an appearance at Montreal’s ComicCon (“a lot of bizarre people are there. It’s an opportunity to express themselves”).

Last, but not least, Shatner, opined on some of his favourite Montreal experiences: dinner with his older sister at a Chinese restaurant, bagels, smoked meat, and garlic spare ribs which he used to enjoy with his family every Sunday night at Ruby Foo’s.

“You can’t get them anywhere else,” he said. “It’s a lost art.”

 

 

Say what? Caffeine could impair recovery of hearing loss

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 11:10

Findings could have a significant impact on the general population, especially for those who ingest high doses of caffeine regularly

A new study by investigators at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has discovered that daily consumption of caffeine can impair recovery after temporary hearing damage. The results are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Since both caffeine intake and noise related hearing loss are so common in our society, these findings could have a significant impact on the general population, especially for those who ingest high doses of caffeine regularly.

Dr Faisal Zawawi, Otolaryngologist and member of the McGill Auditory Sciences Laboratory at the RI-MUHC

Excessive noise is a serious health concern in many workplace environments, from the construction industry, to aviation, mining, and manufacturing. Concerts and other social events can also be an important source of noise, where sound levels may exceed health recommendations and can lead to hearing damage.

“When the ear is exposed to loud noise, it can suffer from a temporary hearing reduction, also called auditory temporary threshold shift,” says Dr. Faisal Zawawi, an Otolaryngologist and member of the McGill Auditory Sciences Laboratory at the RI-MUHC led by Dr Sam J. Daniel. “This disorder is usually reversible in the first 72 hours after the exposure, but if symptoms persist, the damage could become permanent.”

Through their previous work, the researcher had come to suspect that certain substances, such as caffeine, might impact the ear’s ability to recover. Since caffeine intake is so common, especially in environments where noise can be a health hazard, they felt this potential link was worthy of further investigation.

The researchers used an animal model, exposing two groups to a sound of 110 dB – comparable to a loud rock concert – for a period of one hour. One group was administered a daily dose of caffeine, while the other remained caffeine-free. One day later the researchers found that hearing loss was similar in both groups. After eight days, the group without caffeine had recovered almost completely, while hearing impairment persisted in the group receiving daily caffeine. “Our research confirmed that exposure to loud auditory stimuli coupled with daily consumption of 25mg/kg of caffeine had a clear negative impact on hearing recovery,” says Dr. Zawawi. Although further research is required to understand the effect on humans, the results are promising.

Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world. In Western society, at least 80 per cent of the adult population consumes caffeine in amounts large enough to have an effect on the brain. Caffeine is consumed in many different ways, including coffee, tea, soft drinks and energy drinks, and is even used in some medical treatments, such as the treatment for Apnea of Infancy, which involves caffeine and is administered to babies in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The maximum recommended daily intake of caffeine of 3mg/kg – equivalent to three 8oz (237ml) cups of brewed coffee – is often exceeded. Some caffeinated energy drinks, particularly popular with teenagers and young adults, contain more than 200mg of caffeine.

 

Say what? Caffeine could impair recovery of hearing loss

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 11:10

Findings could have a significant impact on the general population, especially for those who ingest high doses of caffeine regularly

A new study by investigators at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) has discovered that daily consumption of caffeine can impair recovery after temporary hearing damage. The results are published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Since both caffeine intake and noise related hearing loss are so common in our society, these findings could have a significant impact on the general population, especially for those who ingest high doses of caffeine regularly.

Dr Faisal Zawawi, Otolaryngologist and member of the McGill Auditory Sciences Laboratory at the RI-MUHC

Excessive noise is a serious health concern in many workplace environments, from the construction industry, to aviation, mining, and manufacturing. Concerts and other social events can also be an important source of noise, where sound levels may exceed health recommendations and can lead to hearing damage.

“When the ear is exposed to loud noise, it can suffer from a temporary hearing reduction, also called auditory temporary threshold shift,” says Dr. Faisal Zawawi, an Otolaryngologist and member of the McGill Auditory Sciences Laboratory at the RI-MUHC led by Dr Sam J. Daniel. “This disorder is usually reversible in the first 72 hours after the exposure, but if symptoms persist, the damage could become permanent.”

Through their previous work, the researcher had come to suspect that certain substances, such as caffeine, might impact the ear’s ability to recover. Since caffeine intake is so common, especially in environments where noise can be a health hazard, they felt this potential link was worthy of further investigation.

The researchers used an animal model, exposing two groups to a sound of 110 dB – comparable to a loud rock concert – for a period of one hour. One group was administered a daily dose of caffeine, while the other remained caffeine-free. One day later the researchers found that hearing loss was similar in both groups. After eight days, the group without caffeine had recovered almost completely, while hearing impairment persisted in the group receiving daily caffeine. “Our research confirmed that exposure to loud auditory stimuli coupled with daily consumption of 25mg/kg of caffeine had a clear negative impact on hearing recovery,” says Dr. Zawawi. Although further research is required to understand the effect on humans, the results are promising.

Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world. In Western society, at least 80 per cent of the adult population consumes caffeine in amounts large enough to have an effect on the brain. Caffeine is consumed in many different ways, including coffee, tea, soft drinks and energy drinks, and is even used in some medical treatments, such as the treatment for Apnea of Infancy, which involves caffeine and is administered to babies in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. The maximum recommended daily intake of caffeine of 3mg/kg – equivalent to three 8oz (237ml) cups of brewed coffee – is often exceeded. Some caffeinated energy drinks, particularly popular with teenagers and young adults, contain more than 200mg of caffeine.

 

La caféine entraverait la guérison de l’oreille suite à une perte d’audition due au bruit

«McGill Reporter» - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 10:47

Cette découverte pourrait avoir un impact significatif sur la population, surtout chez les individus qui consomment régulièrement des doses élevées de caféine

Une nouvelle étude, menée par des chercheurs de l’Institut de recherche du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (IR-CUSM), a démontré que la consommation quotidienne de caféine pourrait entraver la récupération suite à des dommages auditifs temporaires. La consommation de caféine et la perte auditive due au bruit sont deux situations tellement communes au sein de notre société que cette découverte pourrait avoir un impact significatif sur la population, surtout chez les individus qui consomment régulièrement des doses élevées de caféine.

Dr Faisal Zawawi, membre du Laboratoire de sciences auditives de IR-CUSM

Le bruit excessif représente une sérieuse préoccupation de santé au sein de plusieurs environnements de travail, de l’industrie de la construction, à celle de l’aviation, en passant par l’industrie minière et la production industrielle. Les concerts et les autres événements sociaux peuvent également être une source de bruit importante, où les niveaux sonores peuvent facilement excéder les recommandations de santé et mener à la diminution de l’acuité auditive.

« Lorsque l’oreille est surexposée à un son, elle peut souffrir d’une perte auditive temporaire, que l’on appelle aussi un déplacement temporaire du seuil auditif », explique Dr Faisal Zawawi, membre du Laboratoire de sciences auditives de IR-CUSM dirigé par Dr Sam J. Daniel. « Ce type de problème se résout habituellement au cours des 72 heures suivant l’exposition, mais si les symptômes persistent, la dégradation peut s’avérer permanente. »

Grâce à leurs travaux précédents, les chercheurs soupçonnaient déjà que certaines substances, comme la caféine, pourraient avoir un impact sur la capacité de l’oreille à récupérer. Puisque la consommation de caféine est si commune, surtout au sein d’environnements où le bruit peut représenter un risque de santé, ce lien potentiel méritait une enquête plus approfondie.

Les chercheurs ont eu recours au modèle animal, exposant deux groupes à un son de 110 dB (comparable à un concert de rock à volume élevé) pendant une période d’une heure. Un des deux groupes était exposé à des doses de caféine. 24 heures plus tard, les chercheurs ont découvert que la perte auditive était similaire chez les deux groupes. Par contre, à la suite d’une période de huit jours, le groupe sans caféine avait presque complètement retrouvé son seuil auditif initial, alors que la perte auditive persistait chez le groupe recevant de la caféine au quotidien. « Nos recherches ont confirmé que l’exposition à un stimulus auditif à volume élevé, jumelée à une consommation quotidienne de 25mg/kg de caféine a provoqué un impact clairement négatif sur le rétablissement de l’audition », explique Dr Zawawi. Bien que des recherches plus approfondies soient nécessaires pour bien comprendre la nature de l’impact chez les êtres humains; les résultats sont prometteurs et l’étude a été publiée dans le Journal de l’American Medical Association.

La caféine est la substance psychoactive la plus couramment utilisée partout à travers le monde. Dans la société occidentale, au moins 80 % des adultes consomment de la caféine en quantités assez substantielles pour affecter le cerveau. La caféine est consommée de plusieurs différentes façons, elle se retrouve dans le café, le thé, les boissons gazeuses et les boissons énergisantes. Elle est même utilisée dans le cadre de certains traitements médicaux, comme le traitement de l’apnée du sommeil chez l’enfant, où de la caféine est administrée aux nourrissons au sein des Unités de soins intensifs néonataux. L’apport quotidien de caféine recommandé de 3mg/kg [qui équivaut à trois tasses de café de 8 oz (237 ml)] est souvent excédé. Certaines boissons énergisantes, qui sont particulièrement populaires chez les adolescents et les jeunes adultes, contiennent plus de 200 mg de caféine.

 

La caféine entraverait la guérison de l’oreille suite à une perte d’audition due au bruit

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Wed, 07/06/2016 - 10:47

Cette découverte pourrait avoir un impact significatif sur la population, surtout chez les individus qui consomment régulièrement des doses élevées de caféine

Une nouvelle étude, menée par des chercheurs de l’Institut de recherche du Centre universitaire de santé McGill (IR-CUSM), a démontré que la consommation quotidienne de caféine pourrait entraver la récupération suite à des dommages auditifs temporaires. La consommation de caféine et la perte auditive due au bruit sont deux situations tellement communes au sein de notre société que cette découverte pourrait avoir un impact significatif sur la population, surtout chez les individus qui consomment régulièrement des doses élevées de caféine.

Dr Faisal Zawawi, membre du Laboratoire de sciences auditives de IR-CUSM

Le bruit excessif représente une sérieuse préoccupation de santé au sein de plusieurs environnements de travail, de l’industrie de la construction, à celle de l’aviation, en passant par l’industrie minière et la production industrielle. Les concerts et les autres événements sociaux peuvent également être une source de bruit importante, où les niveaux sonores peuvent facilement excéder les recommandations de santé et mener à la diminution de l’acuité auditive.

« Lorsque l’oreille est surexposée à un son, elle peut souffrir d’une perte auditive temporaire, que l’on appelle aussi un déplacement temporaire du seuil auditif », explique Dr Faisal Zawawi, membre du Laboratoire de sciences auditives de IR-CUSM dirigé par Dr Sam J. Daniel. « Ce type de problème se résout habituellement au cours des 72 heures suivant l’exposition, mais si les symptômes persistent, la dégradation peut s’avérer permanente. »

Grâce à leurs travaux précédents, les chercheurs soupçonnaient déjà que certaines substances, comme la caféine, pourraient avoir un impact sur la capacité de l’oreille à récupérer. Puisque la consommation de caféine est si commune, surtout au sein d’environnements où le bruit peut représenter un risque de santé, ce lien potentiel méritait une enquête plus approfondie.

Les chercheurs ont eu recours au modèle animal, exposant deux groupes à un son de 110 dB (comparable à un concert de rock à volume élevé) pendant une période d’une heure. Un des deux groupes était exposé à des doses de caféine. 24 heures plus tard, les chercheurs ont découvert que la perte auditive était similaire chez les deux groupes. Par contre, à la suite d’une période de huit jours, le groupe sans caféine avait presque complètement retrouvé son seuil auditif initial, alors que la perte auditive persistait chez le groupe recevant de la caféine au quotidien. « Nos recherches ont confirmé que l’exposition à un stimulus auditif à volume élevé, jumelée à une consommation quotidienne de 25mg/kg de caféine a provoqué un impact clairement négatif sur le rétablissement de l’audition », explique Dr Zawawi. Bien que des recherches plus approfondies soient nécessaires pour bien comprendre la nature de l’impact chez les êtres humains; les résultats sont prometteurs et l’étude a été publiée dans le Journal de l’American Medical Association.

La caféine est la substance psychoactive la plus couramment utilisée partout à travers le monde. Dans la société occidentale, au moins 80 % des adultes consomment de la caféine en quantités assez substantielles pour affecter le cerveau. La caféine est consommée de plusieurs différentes façons, elle se retrouve dans le café, le thé, les boissons gazeuses et les boissons énergisantes. Elle est même utilisée dans le cadre de certains traitements médicaux, comme le traitement de l’apnée du sommeil chez l’enfant, où de la caféine est administrée aux nourrissons au sein des Unités de soins intensifs néonataux. L’apport quotidien de caféine recommandé de 3mg/kg [qui équivaut à trois tasses de café de 8 oz (237 ml)] est souvent excédé. Certaines boissons énergisantes, qui sont particulièrement populaires chez les adolescents et les jeunes adultes, contiennent plus de 200 mg de caféine.

 

Deadline extended for Principal’s Awards

«McGill Reporter» - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 11:57

The deadline has been extended to submit nominations for the Principal’s Award for Administrative and Support Staff (2015-2016). You have until Monday, July 18 to submit your entry.

You have no doubt seen colleagues go the extra mile to deliver on a special project. The award is about recognition but it is also about rewarding these colleagues with a $5,000 cash prize.

Colleagues can present nominees in five categories: management/professional, technical/library assistants, clerical, trades and services, and team projects. The work must have been carried out between June 1, 2015 and May 31, 2016.

For more information about the nomination process, the selection criteria and the entry form, visit the HR website.

Prix de la Principale au personnel administratif et de soutien – délai prolongé

Ceci est pour vous informer d’une prolongation du délai pour soumettre vos nominations au Prix de la Principale, décerné au personnel administratif et de soutien (2015-2016). Vous avez jusqu’au lundi, 18 juillet, pour soumettre un dossier.

Vous avez sans doute remarqué des collègues qui ont mis des efforts extraordinaires à livrer un projet spécial. Le prix consiste non seulement à reconnaître ces collègues, mais à les récompenser en leur remettant une bourse de 5 000$.

Les nominations peuvent être présentées dans cinq catégories: gestionnaires/spécialistes, employés de bureau, personnel technique/assistants libraires, métiers et services, et projet d’équipe. Le travail doit avoir été accompli pour la période entre le 1er juin 2015 et le 31 mai 2016.

Pour de plus amples renseignements au sujet du processus de nomination, des critères de sélection et du formulaire de nomination, veuillez visiter le site de la Service des Ressources humaines.

Deadline extended for Principal’s Awards

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Tue, 07/05/2016 - 11:57

The deadline has been extended to submit nominations for the Principal’s Award for Administrative and Support Staff (2015-2016). You have until Monday, July 18 to submit your entry.

You have no doubt seen colleagues go the extra mile to deliver on a special project. The award is about recognition but it is also about rewarding these colleagues with a $5,000 cash prize.

Colleagues can present nominees in five categories: management/professional, technical/library assistants, clerical, trades and services, and team projects. The work must have been carried out between June 1, 2015 and May 31, 2016.

For more information about the nomination process, the selection criteria and the entry form, visit the HR website.

Prix de la Principale au personnel administratif et de soutien – délai prolongé

Ceci est pour vous informer d’une prolongation du délai pour soumettre vos nominations au Prix de la Principale, décerné au personnel administratif et de soutien (2015-2016). Vous avez jusqu’au lundi, 18 juillet, pour soumettre un dossier.

Vous avez sans doute remarqué des collègues qui ont mis des efforts extraordinaires à livrer un projet spécial. Le prix consiste non seulement à reconnaître ces collègues, mais à les récompenser en leur remettant une bourse de 5 000$.

Les nominations peuvent être présentées dans cinq catégories: gestionnaires/spécialistes, employés de bureau, personnel technique/assistants libraires, métiers et services, et projet d’équipe. Le travail doit avoir été accompli pour la période entre le 1er juin 2015 et le 31 mai 2016.

Pour de plus amples renseignements au sujet du processus de nomination, des critères de sélection et du formulaire de nomination, veuillez visiter le site de la Service des Ressources humaines.

Thirteen McGillians named to Order of Canada

«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 23:01

Thirteen members of the McGill community got an early start to Canada Day celebrations when they were among the 113 people named to or promoted within the Order of Canada on June 30. The McGillians include alumni, honorary degree recipients and current faculty members. The announcement was made by Governor General David Johnston (former Principal of McGill).

The Order of Canada, one of our country’s highest civilian honours, was established in 1967 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, during Canada’s centennial year, to recognize outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. Over the last 49 years, more than 6 500 people from all sectors of society have been invested into the Order.

Six McGillians were named Officers of the Order of Canada. They include:

  • Eduardo Franco, Director of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology at McGill, for his groundbreaking contributions to the prevention of cervical cancer in Canada and around the world.
  • Philippe Gros (PhD’83), professor in the Department of Biochemistry, for his pioneering use of molecular genetics to identify risk factors in a range of conditions, including infectious diseases and cancer, and for his leadership in the health sciences.
  • Andres Lozano (PhD’89) for his contributions as a neurosurgeon who helped establish deep brain stimulation as a globally recognized treatment for movement disorders.
  • John McCall MacBain (BA’80, LLD’14), for his achievements as a business leader and for his contributions to academic institutions as a philanthropist.
  • Jacques Godbout (DLitt’03) for his significant contributions to the literary arts and critical thinking for over half a century.
  • Roberta L. Jamieson (LLD’11) for her contributions to Indigenous peoples across Canada, particularly for her work to improve funding, access and opportunity for Indigenous youth in the area of education.

Seven members of the McGill community were appointed Members of the Order of Canada. They include:

  • Gerald Batist (MDCM’77), clinical oncologist and Director of the Segal Cancer Centre, for his advances in applying personalized medicine to cancer treatment, and for his leadership in creating research networks in his field. Last week, Batist was named Knight of the Order of Quebec.
  • Françoise Baylis (BA’83) for her contributions as a champion of health care ethics in Canada, and for creating forums to discuss current medical ethics issues.
  • Zita Cobb (DLitt’16) for her contributions as a social entrepreneur who has helped revive the unique rural communities of Fogo Island and Change Islands through innovative social engagement and geotourism.
  • Ned Goodman (BSc’60) for his contributions to Canada’s investment industry and for his philanthropic support for higher education, culture and health care.
  • Laurier Lacroix (MA’72) for his contributions as an art historian, and for his efforts to promote the artistic heritage of Quebec and Canada.
  • Mark Levine (MDCM’76) for his contributions as an oncologist, researcher and clinician who has developed a number of new treatment regimens that have become the Canadian standard in clinical practice.
  • Steve Lurie (M MGMT’02)for his contributions as a leading advocate and administrator in the field of mental health care.

Recipients will be invited to accept their insignia at a ceremony to be held at a later date.

Read the press release issued by the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General.

 

 

Thirteen McGillians named to Order of Canada

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 23:01

Thirteen members of the McGill community got an early start to Canada Day celebrations when they were among the 113 people named to or promoted within the Order of Canada on June 30. The McGillians include alumni, honorary degree recipients and current faculty members. The announcement was made by Governor General David Johnston (former Principal of McGill).

The Order of Canada, one of our country’s highest civilian honours, was established in 1967 Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, during Canada’s centennial year, to recognize outstanding achievement, dedication to the community and service to the nation. Over the last 49 years, more than 6 500 people from all sectors of society have been invested into the Order.

Six McGillians were named Officers of the Order of Canada. They include:

  • Eduardo Franco, Director of the Division of Cancer Epidemiology at McGill, for his groundbreaking contributions to the prevention of cervical cancer in Canada and around the world.
  • Philippe Gros (PhD’83), professor in the Department of Biochemistry, for his pioneering use of molecular genetics to identify risk factors in a range of conditions, including infectious diseases and cancer, and for his leadership in the health sciences.
  • Andres Lozano (PhD’89) for his contributions as a neurosurgeon who helped establish deep brain stimulation as a globally recognized treatment for movement disorders.
  • John McCall MacBain (BA’80, LLD’14), for his achievements as a business leader and for his contributions to academic institutions as a philanthropist.
  • Jacques Godbout (DLitt’03) for his significant contributions to the literary arts and critical thinking for over half a century.
  • Roberta L. Jamieson (LLD’11) for her contributions to Indigenous peoples across Canada, particularly for her work to improve funding, access and opportunity for Indigenous youth in the area of education.

Seven members of the McGill community were appointed Members of the Order of Canada. They include:

  • Gerald Batist (MDCM’77), clinical oncologist and Director of the Segal Cancer Centre, for his advances in applying personalized medicine to cancer treatment, and for his leadership in creating research networks in his field. Last week, Batist was named Knight of the Order of Quebec.
  • Françoise Baylis (BA’83) for her contributions as a champion of health care ethics in Canada, and for creating forums to discuss current medical ethics issues.
  • Zita Cobb (DLitt’16) for her contributions as a social entrepreneur who has helped revive the unique rural communities of Fogo Island and Change Islands through innovative social engagement and geotourism.
  • Ned Goodman (BSc’60) for his contributions to Canada’s investment industry and for his philanthropic support for higher education, culture and health care.
  • Laurier Lacroix (MA’72) for his contributions as an art historian, and for his efforts to promote the artistic heritage of Quebec and Canada.
  • Mark Levine (MDCM’76) for his contributions as an oncologist, researcher and clinician who has developed a number of new treatment regimens that have become the Canadian standard in clinical practice.
  • Steve Lurie (M MGMT’02)for his contributions as a leading advocate and administrator in the field of mental health care.

Recipients will be invited to accept their insignia at a ceremony to be held at a later date.

Read the press release issued by the Office of the Secretary to the Governor General.

 

 

McGill signs agreement with CONACYT

«McGill Reporter» - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 16:02

Enrique Cabrero Mendoza (General Director, CONACYT) and Josephine Nalbantoglu (Dean, Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies) / Photo: Catherine Mercier, Ministère des relations internationales et de la Francophonie

During the Mexican president’s state visit to Canada on June 27, McGill signed an agreement for the establishment of graduate fellowships with the National Council for Science and Technology of the United Mexican States (CONACYT). The agreement aims at attracting Mexican students to pursue graduate studies at Canada’s leading research-intensive university. McGill is proud to have been identified by CONACYT as a destination of choice for Mexican students.

 

 

McGill signs agreement with CONACYT

McGill Reporter Newsfeed - Thu, 06/30/2016 - 16:02

Enrique Cabrero Mendoza (General Director, CONACYT) and Josephine Nalbantoglu (Dean, Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies) / Photo: Catherine Mercier, Ministère des relations internationales et de la Francophonie

During the Mexican president’s state visit to Canada on June 27, McGill signed an agreement for the establishment of graduate fellowships with the National Council for Science and Technology of the United Mexican States (CONACYT). The agreement aims at attracting Mexican students to pursue graduate studies at Canada’s leading research-intensive university. McGill is proud to have been identified by CONACYT as a destination of choice for Mexican students.

 

 

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