Minor Field Studies (18 credits)

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Offered by: Science     Degree: Bachelor of Science

Program Requirements

Students participating in any one of the field study semesters, i.e., the Africa Field Study Semester, the Barbados Field Study Semester, the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies (BITS) Field Study Semester, McGill Arctic Field Study Semester, or the Panama Field Study Semester may complete the 18-credit Minor in Field Studies.

The Minor consists of the 15 credits of a field study semester plus three additional complementary credits chosen by the student in consultation with their departmental adviser and/or the Field Study Minor adviser.

For students in the B.Sc. Liberal Program, the Field Studies Minor can serve as the breadth component.

Program descriptions for each of the field study semesters are provided below.

Note: The field study semesters are not degree programs. Credits may be counted toward McGill degrees with the permission of program advisers. Students who complete a field study semester may consult the Field Study Minor adviser about completing the Minor program as part of their McGill degree.

Africa Field Study Semester (15 credits)

The Africa Field Study Semester (AFSS) is run through McGill's Canadian Field Study in Africa Program (CFSIA).

The AFSS provides one term of integrated field study in East Africa, with emphasis on environmental conservation, culture change, and sustainable development. Students investigate challenges of sustaining biological diversity and social justice in African environments subject to cultural change, economic development, and environmental stress. Cultural and ecological variation is examined in highland, montane, rangeland, desert, riverine, salt- and fresh-water lake, coastal, and urban settings.

Africa Field Study Semester - Required Courses

6 credits

Students select one course titled "Research in Society and Development in Africa" and one course titled "Research in Ecology and Development in Africa" from the courses below.

  • ANTH 451 Research in Society and Development in Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Instruction focuses on three goals: 1) existing research in selected core thematic areas, 2) participating in interdisciplinary team research, 3) developing powers of observation and independent inquiry. Students will be expected to develop research activities and interdisciplinary perspectives, and to become conversant with advances in local research in their field.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Jon Unruh (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: Open to U2 or later students in the AFSS.

    • Corequisite: NRSC 452.

    • Restriction: Open only to AFSS students during the year of participation in the field. Not open to students who have taken GEOG 451.

  • BIOL 451 Research in Ecology and Development in Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Development of observation and independent inquiry skills through: 1) participation in short-term project modules in collaboration with existing researchers; 2) participation in interdisciplinary team research on topics selected to allow comparative analysis of field sites; 3) active and systematic observation, documentation, and integration of field experience in ecology and development issues.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Lauren Chapman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Open only to U2 or later students in the AFSS.

    • Corequisite(s): ANTH 451 or GEOG 451

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 451.

  • GEOG 451 Research in Society and Development in Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Three intersecting components: 1) core development themes including culture change, environmental conservation, water, health, development (urban and rural), governance and conflict resolution, 2) research techniques for topics related to core themes, including ethics, risk, field methods and data analysis, 3) field documentation, scientific recording and communication.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: Open to U2 or later students in the AFSS.

    • Corequisite: NRSC 452.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken, or are taking ANTH 451.

  • NRSC 451 Research in Ecology and Development in Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Development of observation and independent inquiry skills through: 1) participation in short-term project modules in collaboration with existing researchers; 2) participation in interdisciplinary team research on topics selected to allow comparative analysis of field sites; 3) active and systematic observation, documentation, and integration of field experience in ecology and development issues.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Not open to students who have taken or are taking BIOL 451. Open to U2 or later students in the African Field Study Semester (AFSS).

    • Corequisites: ANTH or GEOG 451 Society & Development in Africa

Africa Field Study Semester - Complementary Courses

9 credits from:

* Note: Courses marked with an asterisk ("*") are offered on a rotational basis, at least 3 credits annually.

  • ANTH 411 Primate Studies & Conservation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Critical evaluation of theories in primate behaviour, ecology, and conservation that emphasizes direct observations, research design, and developing field methods.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Sarah Bortolamiol (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology, Geography or Environmental Studies, Introductory Biology, or permission of the instructor.

    • Restriction: Students must have completed at least two full semesters at their home university. Only open to students in the Canadian Field Studies in Africa program.

  • ANTH 416 Environment/Development: Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Anthropology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Anthropology : Study of environmental effects of development in East Africa, especially due to changes in traditional land tenure and resource use across diverse ecosystems. Models, policies and cases of pastoralist, agricultural, fishing, wildlife and tourist development will be examined, across savanna, desert, forest, highland and coastal environments.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Ismael Vaccaro (Winter)

    • Winter

    • Restriction: Open only to students in the Study in Africa program, a full-term field study program in East Africa

    • Prerequisite: One prior course in Anthropology, Geography or Environmental Studies

  • BIOL 428 Biological Diversity in Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Biological diversity as exemplified by a particular taxonomic group chosen by the instructor, using field setting in East Africa to impart training in species identification, field research, and principles embodied in the phylogeny, systematics, biogeography, ecology, physiology and/or behaviour of the organisms concerned.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Student must be enrolled in the Africa Field Study Seminar

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 305 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

    • Corequisite(s): NRSC/BIOL 451 and ANTH/GEOG 451

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken BIOL 328

  • BIOL 429 East African Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Field settings (Uganda, Kenya, and/or Tanzania) are used to impart training in ecological principles critical to tropical conservation with an emphasis on research design and field research exercises.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Lauren Chapman (Winter)

    • Winter

    • The course is to be taught in Africa as a component of the Africa Field Study Semester. Students must register for the Africa Field Study Semester.

    • Prerequisite: BIOL 215 or equivalent.

    • Corequisite: NRSC/BIOL 451 and ANTH/GEOG 451

    • Restriction(s): Not open to students who have taken BIOL 329.

  • GEOG 404 Environmental Management 2 (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Practical application of environmental planning, analysis and management techniques with reference to the needs and problems of developing areas. Special challenges posed by cultural differences and traditional resource systems are discussed. This course involves practical field work in a developing area (Kenya or Panama).

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 302 or permission of instructor

  • GEOG 408 Geography of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Examines the geographical dimensions of development policy, specifically the relationships between the process of development and human-induced environmental change. Focuses on environmental sustainability, struggles over resource control, population and poverty, and levels of governance (the role of the state, non-governmental organizations, and local communities).

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Jon Unruh (Fall)

  • GEOG 423 Dilemmas of Development (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Africa seems beset by development problems. Some of these appear to have no clear answer. Such dilemmas present significant barriers to moving forward with durable, effective development in Africa. This course will examine two primary and frequently interlocked dilemmas in East Africa with wide ranging impact - food security, and conflict.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Jon Unruh (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 310 or GEOG 408 or GEOG 410, or equivalent

    • Restriction: Open to students in the African Field Study Semester (AFSS) only

  • HIST 413 Independent Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Exceptionally, and under the direction of a member of staff, advanced and highly qualified students who have an extensive background in the proposed area of study, may pursue this independent study.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: Written permission

    • Restriction: Open to History Major Concentration students only. Students may register in this course only once.

  • NRSC 405 Natural History of East Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Natural Resource Sciences : Integrated study of African landforms, geologic history, climate, environments, biota, water resources and human influences, fostering a thorough understanding of the East African landscape and its inhabitants. Lectures, discussions on selected topics, use of museum resources and field studies will develop powers of observation, identification and enquiry.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • NUTR 404 Nutrition Field Studies in East Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Human Nutrition (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Nutrition and Dietetics : Community-based case-study experience in East Africa, focussed on documentation and inquiry skills, and systematic analysis of the: 1) patterns and nature of major nutritional and food security problems; 2) sociocultural, economic and environmental determinants on food availability, quality, choice, behaviour and consumption in relation to health and disease, particularly in high risk populations; 3) institutional and policy mediators of community and national-level interventions and program responses.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Timothy A Johns (Winter)

    • Restrictions: Open only to students in the CFSIA program.

  • REDM 405 Natural History of East Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Redpath Museum (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Redpath Museum : Integrated study of African landforms, geologic history, climate, environments, biota, water resources and human influences, fostering a thorough understanding of the East African landscape and its inhabitants. Lectures, discussions on selected topics, use of museum resources and field studies will develop powers of observation, identification and enquiry.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Corequisites: ANTH/GEOG 451 and NRSC/BIOL 451

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken or are taking NRSC 300 or GEOG 300 or NRSC 405. Open only to African Field Study Semester students during the year of participation in the field.

    • Course consists of field exercises, lectures, seminars and discussions.

  • WILD 420 Ornithology (3 credits) *

    Offered by: Natural Resource Sciences (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Resource Development : Taxonomic relationships and evolution of birds are outlined. Reproduction, migration and population processes of North American birds are examined.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Kyle Elliott (Fall)

    • Winter

    • 3 lectures and occasional field trips

    • Prerequisite: WILD 307 (formerly ZOOL 307) or permission of instructor

    • This course is scheduled for video-conferencing.

    • This course carries an additional charge of $16.54 to cover the cost of transportation (bus rental) for local field trips. The fee is refundable only during the withdrawal with full refund period.

Barbados Field Study Semester (15 credits)

The Barbados Field Study Semester (BFSS) provides one term of integrated field study for students with an interest in global issues related to natural resource use as affected by socio-economic, management, urban, and physical constraints. Offered at the Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados, this program challenges students to be more effective environmental decision makers, policy makers, and managers. There is a growing need for professionals with such skills at all levels of government, within NGOs, and in the private sector. The overall goal of the BFSS is to equip future leaders to address the complexity of issues associated with the formulation and implementation of organizational strategies compatible with the societal goal of sustainable use and development of our natural resources.

The BFSS is intended for senior undergraduate students from across the University. Students must apply to participate in the program. Selection will be based on the student's Academic Standing and demonstrated interests and involvement in international issues related to natural resource use.

Barbados Field Study Semester - Required Courses

6 credits

  • URBP 507 Planning and Infrastructure (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : An exploration of the interrelationship between land-use planning and infrastructure provision, especially water and sewerage. An examination of their policy and regulatory frameworks and other methodology of plan making and evaluation.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Lisa Bornstein, Paul Lecavalier (Fall)

    • (8-.5-.5)

    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field study Semester.

  • URBP 520 Globalization: Planning and Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Economic and social issues related to planning for sustainable development, with a focus on water. Political and environmental determinants of resource use. Impact of global, regional and local institutions, programs and plans in Barbados and in the field locale in general.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli, Hugo Melgar-Quiñonez (Fall)

    • (3-3-3)

    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.

Barbados Field Study Semester - Complementary Courses

9 credits

Students select one 3-credit course titled "Water Resources in Barbados" and one 6-credit course titled "Sustainable Development Plans" from the list below.

  • AGRI 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Physical environment challenges, centered on water, being faced by an island nation. Guest speakers, field study tours and laboratory tests. Private, government and NGO institutional context of conservation strategies, and water quantity and quality analyses for water management specific to Barbados.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Susan J Gaskin (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 452.

  • AGRI 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Bioresource Engineering (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Enrolment in full "Barbados Field Study Semester". Not open to students who have taken CIVE 519 or URBP 519.

  • CIVE 452 Water Resources in Barbados (3 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : Challenges faced and available engineering solutions for water-stressed communities. Overview of Barbados’ water resources, fundamentals of hydrology, contaminant transport and groundwater remediation in a karst geologic environment. Technologies associated with water reuse, legislation, health effects, epidemiology. Laboratory tests for water quality; field study tours.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Ronald Gehr, Susan J Gaskin (Fall)

    • Restrictions: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.

  • CIVE 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Civil Engineering (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Civil Engineering : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of two to four students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • (1-9-8)

    • Restriction: Must be enrolled in the Barbados Field Study Semester.

  • URBP 519 Sustainable Development Plans (6 credits)

    Offered by: Urban Planning (Faculty of Engineering)

    Overview

    Urban Planning : Geared for solving real-world environmental problems related to water at the local, regional and international scale in Barbados. Projects to be designed by instructors in consultation with university, government and NGO partners and to be conducted by teams of 2 to 4 students in collaboration with them.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Inteaz Alli (Fall)

    • (0-10-8)

    • Restrictions: Must be enrolled in Barbados Field Study Semester. Not open to students who have taken or are taking AGRI 519 or CIVE 519.

Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester (15 credits)

The Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies (BITS) Field Semester is an activity-filled, hands-on experience for students with an interest in international studies with a Caribbean flavour. The focus is on sustainable agri-food, nutrition, and energy production on a tropical island with a tourist-based economy. It is offered annually (in the Summer). It consists of two 2-hour orientation sessions conducted on the Macdonald campus and at the Bellairs Research Institute in Barbados, followed by three 3-credit and one 6-credit project courses at Bellairs Research Institute. This program integrates intensive course work with group project work and contributes to the formation of professionals with planning, managing, decision-making, and communication skills. The program addresses a global need for experienced professionals capable of interacting with various levels of government, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector. BITS welcomes applications from senior undergraduate students from across the University.

Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester - Required Courses

15 credits

  • AEBI 421 Tropical Horticultural Ecology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : A comprehensive survey of the major fruit, vegetable, turf, and ornamental crops grown in Barbados. Effect of cultural practices, environment, pests and pathogens, social and touristic activities, and importation of horticultural produce on local horticulture.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Danielle J Donnelly (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 423, AEBI 425, AEBI 427

    • Restriction: Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester

    • **Due to the intensive nature of this course, the standard add/drop and withdrawal deadlines do not apply. Add/drop is the third lecture day and withdrawal is the sixth lecture day.

  • AEBI 423 Sustainable Land Use (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Management, preservation, and utilization of forage crops in sustainable tropical environments; examination of their value as livestock feed in terms of nutritional composition and impact on animal performance; land use issues as it pertains to forage and animal production in insular environments.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Philippe Seguin, Elsa Vasseur (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 421, AEBI 425, AEBI 427

    • Restriction: Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester

    • **Since this course is being taught abroad, la Fête Nationale du Québec (June 24th) and Canada Day (July 1st) statutory holidays will not be taken into consideration. Therefore, students are expected to attend their lectures on both Friday, June 24 and Friday, July 1, 2016.

    • **Due to the intensive nature of this course, the standard add/drop and withdrawal deadlines do not apply. Add/drop is the third lecture day and withdrawal is the sixth lecture day.

  • AEBI 425 Tropical Energy and Food (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : Tropical biofuel crops, conversion processes and final products, particularly energy and greenhouse gas balances and bionutraceuticals. Topics include effects of process extraction during refining on biofuel economics, the food versus fuel debate and impact of biofuels and bioproducts on tropical agricultural economics.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Donald L Smith, Stan Kubow, Mark Lefsrud (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 421, AEBI 423 and AEBI 427.

    • Restriction: Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester

    • **Due to the intensive nature of this course, the standard add/drop and withdrawal deadlines do not apply. Add/drop is the third lecture day and withdrawal is the sixth lecture day.

  • AEBI 427 Barbados Interdisciplinary Project (6 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Biology (Agric & Envir Sc) : The planning of projects and research activities related to tropical food, nutrition, or energy at the local, regional, or national scale in Barbados. Projects and activities designed in consultation with university instructors, government, NGO, or private partners, and prepared by teams of 2-3 students working cooperatively with these mentors.

    Terms: Summer 2018

    Instructors: Danielle J Donnelly (Summer)

    • Corequisite(s): AEBI 421, AEBI 423 and AEBI 425

    • Restriction(s): Restricted to students that are participating in the Barbados Interdisciplinary Tropical Studies Field Semester

    • **Since this course is being taught abroad, the Victoria Day statutory holiday will not be taken into consideration. Therefore, students are expected to attend their lecture on Monday, May 22, 2017.

    • **Although this course follows a Monday/Tuesday class schedule pattern, the last class will be on Wednesday, August 22 which is when the Project Presentations will be held.

Panama Field Study Semester (15 credits)

This program is offered in Panama with the support of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI).

Hands-on experience is gained through research projects organized around multidisciplinary environmental issues. The nature of these projects will centre on practical environmental problems/questions important for Panama. Students will form teams that will work with Panamanian institutions (NGO, governmental, or research).

There is a one- or two-day period of transition and 13 weeks of course attendance in Panama. Field trips will be integrated into each of the courses offered.

Panama Field Study Semester - Required Courses

9 credits

  • BIOL 553 Neotropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Biology (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Biology (Sci) : Ecology revisited in view of tropical conditions. Exploring species richness. Sampling and measuring biodiversity. Conservation status of ecosystems, communities and species. Indigenous knowledge.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Catherine Potvin (Winter)

  • ENVR 451 Research in Panama (6 credits)

    Offered by: McGill School of Environment (School of Environment)

    Administered by: Faculty of Science

    Overview

    Environment : Research projects will be developed by instructors in consultation with Panamanian universities, government agencies and non-governmental organizations. Project groups will consist of four to six students working with a Panamanian institution. Topics will be relevant to Panama: e.g., protection of the Canal watershed, economical alternatives to deforestation, etc.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Winter

    • Restriction: students in the Panama Field Semester program. Offered in Panama only

Panama Field Study Semester - Complementary Courses

6 credits

Complementary courses change from year to year. Students will register for the 6 credits offered the Winter of their participation in the field study semester.

First Winter semester complementary courses:

  • AGRI 550 Sustained Tropical Agriculture (3 credits)

    Offered by: Plant Science (Agricultural & Environmental Sciences)

    Overview

    Agriculture : Contrast theory and practice in defining agricultural environmental "challenges" in the Neotropics. Indigenous and appropriate technological means of mitigation. Soil management and erosion, water scarcity, water over-abundance, and water quality. Explore agro-ecosystem protection via field trips and project designs. Institutional context of conservation strategies, NGO links, and public participation.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Caroline B Begg (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218 or equivalent; MATH 203 or AEMA 310 or equivalent

    • Restriction: Restricted Enrolment. Location in Panama. Student must be registered for a full semester of studies in Panama

  • GEOG 498 Humans in Tropical Environments (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Focus on understanding of inter-relations between humans and neotropical environments represented in Panama. Study of contemporary rural landscapes, their origins, development and change. Impacts of economic growth and inequality, social organization, and politics on natural resource use and environmental degradation. Site visits and field exercises in peasant/colonist, Amerindian, and plantation communities.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Oliver T Coomes (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 6 hours lecture for 4 weeks, 3 hours seminar, 2 hours laboratory, 8 hours conference

    • Restriction: Location in Panama. Student must register for a full semester of studies in Panama

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218, MATH 203 or equivalents

Second Winter semester complementary courses:

  • GEOG 404 Environmental Management 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Practical application of environmental planning, analysis and management techniques with reference to the needs and problems of developing areas. Special challenges posed by cultural differences and traditional resource systems are discussed. This course involves practical field work in a developing area (Kenya or Panama).

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Thomas C Meredith (Winter)

    • Winter

    • 3 hours

    • Prerequisite: GEOG 302 or permission of instructor

  • HIST 510 Environmental History of Latin America (Field) (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : Human-nature interactions over different scales of time in Latin America (with an emphasis on neo-tropical environments) and the application of the historical perspective to contemporary environmental issues, including historiography and methodology; cultures of environmental knowledge.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • This course will be offered in Panama as part of the Panama Field Studies Semester. Language of instruction is in English but fluency in Spanish is required for the fieldwork component of the class.

    • Prerequisites: HISP 218 or HISP 210 or equivalent proficiency

McGill Arctic Field Study Semester

Required Courses (15 credits)

9 credits

  • ATOC 373 Arctic Climate and Climate Change (3 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : Introduction to the principles of Arctic climate and climate change with a special focus on the Canadian Arctic. The primary objectives of the course are to 1)develop an understanding of the presentday high latitude climate, including the atmosphere, the ocean and the sea ice, 2) develop an understanding of the role of the polar regions in the global climate and climate change, and 3) introduce students to field methods of polar research including ice coring, sea-ice buoys installation and data analysis, atmospheric measurements (radiative and turbulent heat fluxes), and ocean hydrographic measurements (e.g. CTD, nets).

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • EPSC 373 Arctic Geology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : This course introduces students to the principles of the geology of the Canadian Arctic. The primary objectives of the course are to train students in theory and practice of geology in the Canadian Arctic. Practical training includes drill core logging, surveying, mapping, sample collecting, and geological interpretations.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • GEOG 373 Arctic Geomorphology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : Introduction to the principles of periglacial and permafrost science and its field context in the Canadian North. Objectives focus on the geomorphic significance of freezing and frozen ground and training in field methods of permafrost mapping, measurement and interpretation.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

and 6 credits from

  • ATOC 473 Artic Field Research (6 credits)

    Offered by: Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Atmospheric & Oceanic Sciences : This course is the independent research component of the McGill Arctic Field Study Semester. It has four distinct parts, a) problem identification and background preparation, b) research design and field data collection, c) lab and data analysis, and d) report preparation and presentation. The research design and field data collection will be part of an extended period of fieldwork based in the Canadian Arctic. The Lab and data analysis will begin in the field and finish on campus. Each student will prepare a manuscript style report and make a conference presentation based on their research.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Corequisite(s): GEOG 373, EPSC 373 and ATOC 373

    • Restriction(s): Permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken or are taking EPSC 473 or GEOG 473.

    • Note(s): 1. This course is one of a set of four field courses (ATOC 373, EPSC 373, GEOG 373, and ATOC/EPSC/GEOG 473) designed to be taken concurrently. It complements programs in natural science disciplines by providing students with specialized field training and research experience focusing on the unique environmental conditions of cold polar systems. 2. Cost includes transportation, room and board, field expenses. Students are charged $12,000 for the four courses combined: ATOC, 373, EPSC 373, GEOG 373, and ATOC/EPSC/GEOG 473. 3. Arctic localities: Iqaluit, Resolute Bay, and Central Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic.

  • EPSC 473 Arctic Field Research (6 credits)

    Offered by: Earth & Planetary Sciences (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Earth & Planetary Sciences : This course is the independent research component of the McGill Arctic Field Study Semester. It has four distinct parts, a) problem identification and background preparation, b) research design and field data collection, c) lab and data analysis, and d) report preparation and presentation. The research design and field data collection will be part of an extended period of fieldwork based in the Canadian Arctic. The Lab and data analysis will begin in the field and finish on campus. Each student will prepare a manuscript style report and make a conference presentation based on their research.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Corequisite(s): GEOG 373, EPSC 373 and ATOC 373.

    • Restriction(s): Permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken or are taking ATOC 473 or GEOG 473.

    • Note(s): 1. This course is one of a set of four field courses (ATOC 373, EPSC 373, GEOG 373, and ATOC/EPSC/GEOG 473) designed to be taken concurrently. It complements programs in natural science disciplines by providing students with specialized field training and research experience focusing on the unique environmental conditions of cold polar systems. 2. Cost includes transportation, room and board, field expenses. Students are charged $12,000 for the four courses combined: ATOC, 373, EPSC 373, GEOG 373, and ATOC/EPSC/GEOG 473. 3. Arctic localities: Iqaluit, Resolute Bay, and Central Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic.

  • GEOG 473 (6 credits)

    Offered by: Geography (Faculty of Science)

    Overview

    Geography : This course is the independent research component of the McGill Arctic Field Study Semester. It has four distinct parts, a) problem identification and background preparation, b) research design and field data collection, c) lab and data analysis, and d) report preparation and presentation. The research design and field data collection will be part of an extended period of fieldwork based in the Canadian Arctic. The Lab and data analysis will begin in the field and finish on campus. Each student will prepare a manuscript style report and make a conference presentation based on their research.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Corequisite(s): GEOG 373, EPSC 373 and ATOC 373.

    • Restriction(s): Permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken or are taking ATOC 473 or EPSC 473.

    • Note(s): 1. This course is one of a set of four field courses (ATOC 373, EPSC 373, GEOG 373, and ATOC/EPSC/GEOG 473) designed to be taken concurrently. It complements programs in natural science disciplines by providing students with specialized field training and research experience focusing on the unique environmental conditions of cold polar systems. 2. Cost includes transportation, room and board, field expenses. Students are charged $12,000 for the four courses combined: ATOC, 373, EPSC 373, GEOG 373, and ATOC/EPSC/GEOG 473. 3. Arctic localities: Iqaluit, Resolute Bay, and Central Axel Heiberg Island in the Canadian High Arctic.

Minor Field Studies - Complementary Course

In consultation with their departmental adviser and/or the Field Study Minor adviser, students who have completed one of the field study semesters described above may select a 3-credit complementary course to complete the requirements for the Minor and ask for it to be added to their academic records.

Faculty of Science—2017-2018 (last updated Aug. 23, 2017) (disclaimer)