Dept. of Physiology

24Sep202111:00
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12:00

While innate, the display of many behaviors is influenced by cortical activities. Using Vglut1 as a molecular marker for cortical structures, we and others have identified populations of excitatory neurons in the primary motor cortex (M1), the posterior amygdala (PA), and the ventral subiculum (vSub) that project to distinct divisions of hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei to regulate urination, aggression, and innate anxiety responses. Together, these findings elucidate how cortical and subcortical structures may interact to control the display of diverse natural behaviors.

Classified as: dept. of physiology, MacIntosh Lectureship
1Oct202111:00
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12:00

We have examined the type of immune memory that forms in individuals that experience mild COVID-19. Longitudinal analyses of SARS-CoV2 memory B and T cells were performed, specifically focused on the functional attributes of each population. More recent data has examined the response to vaccination in either previously infected or infected individuals and demonstrate distinct characteristics of immune memory in the two populations.

This seminar will be given online via Zoom. Details in attached poster.

Classified as: dept. of physiology, MacIntosh Lectureship
15Oct202111:00
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12:00

Maintaining average activity level within a set-point range constitutes a fundamental property of central neural circuits. Accumulated evidence suggests that mean firing rate (MFR), reflecting an average level of spontaneous spiking activity over extended timescales, represents a physiological variable regulated by homeostatic systems in central neural circuits. However, some central questions have remained open. What are the mechanisms that establish the specific values of MFR set-points? Are MFR set-points fixed (predetermined) or adjustable in central neural circuits?

Classified as: dept. of physiology, seminar
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