Dept. of Physiology

23Apr202111:00
to
12:00

In the healthy lung the opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is rapidly eliminated by mucociliary clearance, a process that is dependent on the activity of the CFTR anion channel that, in concert with a number of other transport proteins, regulates the volume and composition of the periciliary surface liquid. This fluid layer is essential to enable cilia to clear pathogens from the lungs. However, in cystic fibrosis (CF), mutations in the CFTR gene reduce Cl and HCO3 secretion, thereby decreasing periciliary surface liquid volume and mucociliary clearance of bacteria.

Classified as: dept. of physiology, Cystic Fibrosis Translational Research Centre
30Apr202111:00
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12:00

The beneficial effects of infection and the ensuing inflammation on neurological disorders have previously been noted. For example, a subset of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) exhibits temporary but considerable improvements in their behavioral symptoms during episodes of fever, a sign of systemic inflammation. However, a mechanistic understanding of how fever-associated immune responses translate into behavioral relief—both at the molecular and neural level—is lacking.

Classified as: dept. of physiology, seminar
7May202111:00
to
12:00

Although breast cancer treatment has significantly improved over the last decade, developments in the treatment of metastatic tumors lag behind, with 14 women dying of breast cancer every day. A clearer understanding of the mechanisms controlling cell migration and invasion is needed to identify new therapeutic targets and prevent the spread of primary tumors to distant metastatic sites. In this presentation, we show that the adapter proteins ShcA (p46/52) and lipoma-preferred partner (LPP) are required for TGFβ-induced cell migration and invasion of ErbB2+ breast cancer cells.

Classified as: dept. of physiology, seminar
14May202115:30
to
16:30

BIERMAN'S GUEST LECTURE

Plasticity of cancer invasion, metastasis and therapy response

Classified as: dept. of physiology, seminar, Bierman's lecture, hs-communications
21May202111:00
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12:00

This presentation will focus on describing ependymal cells in disease, focusing on CSF inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) and how it correlates with disease progression. It will focus largely on brain pathology bordering CSF-exposed areas and how CSF inflammation affects parenchymal barriers cells.

This seminar will be given online via Zoom. Details in attached poster.

Classified as: dept. of physiology, seminar
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