Program Overview

""What does the program cover?

It Takes All of Us: Creating a Campus Community Free of Sexual Violence is a learning program that strives to increase awareness of sexual violence, to ensure that our campus culture is based on respect and consent, and to help create a community free of sexual violence.

The training consists of four modules that use character-driven scenarios to teach important topics surrounding sexual violence and its impact.
 

When can I gain access to the program, and when am I expected to complete it?

Due to the size of McGill’s population, the program is currently being rolled out in phases to our various community members—use the chart below to find your approximate date of access and completion date. Once you have been given access, the course will appear on myCourses when you click “View All Courses” at the bottom of the homepage.

GROUP PROGRAM ACCESS DATE COMPLETION DATE
Incoming students (student version) - Winter 2020 admits Upon course registration March 19, 2020
Incoming students (student version) - Summer & Fall 2020 admits Upon course registration November 29, 2020
All administrative/support staff, academic staff, TAs, RAs, and post-doctoral researchers (staff version)

January-February 2020

May 31, 2020
All newly hired staff and/or employees (including casual staff) Upon receipt of first paycheck 3 months following the start date of employment

 

Does everyone complete the same program?

Everyone receives the same training and the two programs are almost identical. Both programs explore scenarios that could be encountered in real life, with students being the main characters in the student program scenarios and faculty & staff being the main characters in the faculty & staff program scenarios. Explore the tabs below for a further breakdown of the differences between the student modules and the faculty & staff modules.
 

How do I access the program?

The program is hosted on myCourses, McGill’s online Learning Management System. To access the program, log in to myCourses using your McGill credentials and click “View All Courses.” Note that the program is best viewed on a computer (as opposed to a mobile device) using Google Chrome.
 

Where can I find the program transcripts?

You can access both the Student Program and Staff Program transcripts by using the links below.

Module Breakdown

Module 1: Sexual Violence

This module explores definitions and statistics surrounding sexual violence. You will learn about the many forms sexual violence can take and its prevalence in different demographics. The module also addresses and counters some common myths surrounding sexual violence.

Student Module vs. Staff & Faculty Module

Students and staff members complete the exact same Module 1.

Module 2: Sexual Consent

This module explains the definition of sexual consent and what consent - and its absence - can look and sound like. It explores different character-driven scenarios and gives you language with which to ask your partner for consent. It also explores scenarios where someone would be unable to give consent and talks about how intoxication can complicate consent.

Student Module vs. Staff & Faculty Module

Student Module Staff & Faculty Module
  • Talking About Consent
  • What is Consent?
  • Scenario #1: How Do You Know?
    (Study Session: Alex & Jesse)
  • How to Talk About It
  • Giving Consent
  • Scenario #2 : How To Talk About It
    (Intoxication & Consent; Simon & Sam)
  • Intoxication and Consent
  • Power Dynamics
  • Module 2 Review
  • Introduction
  • What is Consent?
  • Power Dynamics
  • Guidelines
  • Learning Environment
  • Scenario #1: Ethical Relationships
    (Joe & professor)
  • Module 2 Review

Module 3: Bystander Intervention

This module defines the terms "bystander," "bystander intervention," and "bystander effect." It explores what behaviours can lead to sexual violence and how to safely intervene before a situation escalates.

Student Module vs. Staff & Faculty Module*

Student Module Staff & Faculty Module
  • Bystander Intervention
  • Intervention: Step 1
  • Intervention: Step 2
  • Intervention: Step 3
  • Bystander Intervention
  • Intervention: Step 1
  • Intervention: Step 2
  • Intervention: Step 3
  • Scenario #3: How To Intervene
    (Addison, Manu, Jayna)
  • How To Intervene
  • Scenario #2: How to Intervene
    (Tim, Shaun, Anna)
  • How To Intervene
  • Module 3 Review
  • Module 3 Review

*Rows with a grey background have the same content across both modules. Rows with a white background have different content.

Module 4: Supporting Survivors

This module discusses some of the consequences sexual violence can have on survivors, as well as some of the barriers survivors face when disclosing their experience. It also explores how to respond to a disclosure of sexual violence with compassion, and lists resources for anyone seeking help or support.

Student Module vs. Staff & Faculty Module*

Student Module Staff & Faculty Module
  • Impact on Survivors
  • Barriers to Disclosure
  • Impact on Survivors
  • Barriers to Disclosure
  • Scenario #4: Responding to Disclosure (Jesse & Alex)
  • Scenario #3: How to Respond to Disclosure (Colleague’s disclosure)
  • How to Respond to Disclosure
  • Tips for Responding to Disclosure
  • How to Respond to Disclosure
  • Tips for Responding to Disclosure
 
  • Scenario #4: Disclosure – Support & Resources (Jad’s disclosure)
  • Resources
  • Module 4 Review
  • Resources
  • Module 4 Review

*Rows with a grey background have the same content across both modules. Rows with a white background have different content.

 


This course is based on Concordia University’s “It Takes All of Us – Creating a Campus Community Free of Sexual Violence”, which is based upon expertise provided by Jennifer (JD) Drummond, Sexual Assault Resource Centre (SARC) Coordinator, Concordia University, and other contributors, and developed by KnowledgeOne, Concordia University’s online education service provider. © Concordia University 2019.



McGill University is situated on the traditional territory of the Kanien’kehà:ka, a place which has long served as a site of meeting and exchange amongst nations. We recognize and respect the Kanien’kehà:ka as the traditional custodians of the lands and waters on which we meet today.


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