Staff Gardens

Plants sprouting in container garden

About the Staff Gardens

The Staff Gardens consist of over 75 container gardens on the Burnside terrace. McGill staff and faculty can sign up for a garden free of charge, where groups (three or more) purchase their own seeds, and maintain the plots themselves. Learning opportunities are provided through bi-weekly Lunch-and-Learn sessions about gardening techniques, urban agriculture, and sustainability on campus. Participating in the gardens is a great way to foster community within your department and an opportunity to meet staff from other departments on campus.

History of Edible Campus

Edible Campus has operated at McGill since 2007, beginning as a partnership between the School of Architecture and community organization, Santropol Roulant. The garden was coordinated by Santropol, and harvested produce was distributed to low income areas through their Meals on Wheels program. In 2016, Santropol announced they would be transitioning out of the space as they needed to focus on their other agriculture spaces. McGill’s Office of Sustainability took over a section of the container plots to start the Staff Gardens in the summer of 2017. Midnight Kitchen and the Office for Students with Disabilities manage the other nearby garden plots.

Registration information

Registration is now closed for 2018. Gardens open towards the end of May and close in early October (weather dependent). 

Testimonials

“We really had a lot of fun with this project. It was also great team building as the people who participated from our unit would not ordinarily interact with each other. It was our first gardening experience and we made some rookie mistakes. We would LOVE to try again next year!!! Thank you!”

“It was a wonderful opportunity that enabled me to meet pockets of the university that I would otherwise not have any contact with. I also learned a lot about gardening and had a place to go and unwind in the middle of very stressful days. Thank you!”

“It was fun to be able to grow things at work, especially when space might be limited at home.”

 

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