Your Academic Career at McGill

Your Academic Career at McGill

University-Wide Regulations

University-Wide Regulations

This publication contains the regulations about your undergraduate academic career at McGill. It includes regulations concerning when to register, when to add, drop, or withdraw from courses, the consequences of missing deadlines, how grading appears on your transcript, and other important information.

Faculty-Specific Regulations

Faculty-Specific Regulations

McGill has 11 faculties, and every student belongs to one of them. When you are admitted to McGill, your offer letter indicates the faculty, degree, and program to which you have been accepted, and the number of credits you need to complete for your degree.

You should consult the appropriate faculty section in this publication for information pertinent to your degree and program, and for faculty-specific regulations.

Your Academic Program

Your Academic Program

You are registered in a degree, but for many degrees there are associated programs (a major, minor, major concentration, etc.). For some degrees, such as Bachelor of Engineering, you will typically follow one program (such as Computer Engineering). For others, such as Bachelor of Arts, you will typically follow more than one program (such as a major concentration in English, with a minor concentration in History).

A typical undergraduate degree at McGill is 120–140 credits (four years of full-time study).

  • Quebec CEGEP students typically receive 30 credits of Advanced Standing, so they will usually only have a further 90–110 credits (three years of full-time study) to complete. This varies by faculty, so consult your faculty section. In your first year, you will be placed in U1 (undergraduate year 1).
  • Most other students typically have 120–140 credits to complete. This varies by faculty, so consult your faculty section. In your first year, you will be placed in U0 (undergraduate year 0), which is often referred to in this publication and elsewhere as your freshman year.
  • Many students at McGill come with other forms of Advanced Standing (International Baccalaureate, French Baccalaureate, advanced placement exams, or students admitted from other universities as transfer students). If this is your case, you will receive information during the admissions process.
Note: Students given Advanced Standing who nevertheless wish to complete 120 McGill credits may be allowed to do so; for full details, see Advanced Standing Transfer Credits.

You will find program requirements in your faculty section or in departmental sections within a faculty. In some cases, you may pursue one of your programs in a department outside your faculty. For example, if you are enrolled in a Bachelor of Commerce, but are pursuing a minor concentration in Italian Civilization, you would consult the Desautels Faculty of Management section for the B.Com. requirements, and the Italian Studies department section, under the Faculty of Arts, for the Italian Civilization program requirements.

Important things to know about your academic program:

Important things to know about your academic program:

  • The number of credits needed to complete your academic program or programs and, ultimately, your degree. Typically, three credits correspond to a one-term course, but there are many variations; for more information, see Credit System.
  • For information about required, complementary, and elective courses, see Course Terminology and Courses Taken under the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) Option.
  • Some departments or programs may provide you with a recommended list of courses (or streams), so that you know the typical term-by-term course pattern. There may also be a program guide or handbook available; you can ask your departmental or program adviser about this.

For more assistance in understanding program requirements, and for a list of advisers on both Downtown and Macdonald campuses, see Undergraduate Advising.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2022-2023 (last updated May. 20, 2021) (disclaimer)

Advising and the University Mission

Advising and the University Mission

The Mission Statement of the University expresses the commitment to offer students the best education available. An essential component of this is the advising process. Academic advising takes place in many ways and locations at McGill, so it is important that you learn about the different Types of Advising and Advisers and how they can help you reach your goals. You should also consult the advising information provided on your Faculty's website (Contact Information for Faculty & School Student Affairs Offices) and on the Academic Advising website.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2022-2023 (last updated May. 20, 2021) (disclaimer)

The Role of Student Advising

The Role of Student Advising

Your active participation in the advising process is essential for accessing the full range of academic opportunities during your studies. You must be proactive in seeking meetings with various academic advisers, professors, and related administrative units to ensure that you receive the advice you need to formulate a personal plan of study and to meet your academic goals. While advisers are there to provide you with guidance, you are ultimately responsible for meeting your degree or diploma requirements. It is your responsibility to learn the rules and regulations of the University, your faculty, and your program. With your collaboration, your academic advisers can assist you throughout your undergraduate studies.

Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2022-2023 (last updated May. 20, 2021) (disclaimer)
Programs, Courses and University Regulations—2022-2023 (last updated May. 20, 2021) (disclaimer)
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