Minor Concentration Social Entrepreneurship (18 credits)

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Offered by: Arts - Dean's Office     Degree: Bachelor of Arts

Program Requirements

This Minor Concentration is a collaboration of the Faculty of Arts and the Desautels Faculty of Management and is designed to provide Arts (B.A.) students with an understanding of how to conceptualize, develop, and manage successful new ventures—including social enterprises, not-for-profit organizations, and cooperatives. The program covers the essentials of management and is interdisciplinary and integrative. Many courses in the Minor Concentration will address a mix of students from across multiple McGill faculties.

This Minor Concentration is restricted to students who have completed one year of university studies with a minimum CGPA of 3.0. The Minor Concentration Social Entrepreneurship has limited enrolment; students should contact the Program Director to apply for admission.

Students in this Minor Concentration are not permitted to take the Joint Honours Economics/Finance, Joint Honours Economics/Accounting or Desautels Minors in Management, Marketing, Finance, or Operations Management (for Non-Management Students).

Required Courses (12 credits)

  • INTG 201 Integrated Management Essentials 1 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Management (Desautels Faculty of Management)

    Overview

    INTG : Essentials of management using an integrated approach. Three modules (managing money, managing people and managing information) cover fundamentals of accounting, finance, organizational behaviour and information systems; and illustrate how the effective management of human, financial and technological resources contributes to the success of an organization. Emphasizes an integrated approach to management, highlighting how organizations function as a whole and the importance of being able to work across functional and organizational boundaries.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Desmond Tsang, Sujata Madan, Chantal Westgate, Genevieve Bassellier, David Schumacher (Fall)

    • Only open to U1, U2, U3 non-Management students. Not open to students in the Desautels Faculty of Management or students who have taken two or more of courses MGCR 211, MGCR 222 or MGCR 341.

    • Limited enrolment; priority registration to students in Minors in Entrepreneurship. Note: this course is not part of the Desautels Minors in Management, Finance, Marketing or Operations Management (for non-Management students).

  • INTG 202 Integrated Management Essentials 2 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Management (Desautels Faculty of Management)

    Overview

    INTG : Essentials of management using an integrated approach. Four modules (managing customer relationships, managing processes, managing digital innovation and managing the enterprise) cover fundamentals of marketing, strategy, operations and information systems; and illustrate how this knowledge is harnessed in an organization to create value for customers and other stakeholders. Emphasizes an integrated approach to management, highlighting how organizations function as a whole and the importance of being able to work across functional and organizational boundaries.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Richard George Donovan, Genevieve Bassellier, Saurabh Mishra, Mehmet Gumus, Corey Phelps (Winter)

    • Restriction(s): Only open to U1, U2, U3 students. Not open to students in the Desautels Faculty of Management or students who have taken two or more of courses MGCR 331, MGCR 352, MGCR 423 or MGCR 472.

    • Limited enrolment; priority registration to students in Minors in Entrepreneurship. It is suggested that students take INTG 201 prior to INTG 202, but is not required. Note: this course is not part of the Desautels Minors in Management, Finance, Marketing or Operations Management (for non-Management Students).

  • MGPO 362 Fundamentals of Entrepreneurship (3 credits)

    Offered by: Management (Desautels Faculty of Management)

    Overview

    Management Policy : Study of the key aspects involved in starting and managing a new venture: identifying opportunities and analyzing new venture ideas, identifying common causes of failure and strategies for success, understanding intellectual property systems, comparison of multiple modes of funding. Applies to for-profit and not-for-profit start-ups.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Peter Younkin, Daphne Demetry (Fall) Gregory Bryan Vit (Winter)

    • Prerequisite(s): INTG 201 and INTG 202 for non-Management students. (INTG 201 is a prerequisite for non-Management students. INTG 202 is a prerequisite for non-Management students, but can be taken concurrently.)

    • Restriction(s): Only open to U2, U3 students.

    • Limited enrolment; priority registration to Management students and non-Management students in Minors in Entrepreneurship. INTG 201 is a prerequisite for non-Management students and must be taken prior to this course. INTG 202 is a prerequisite for non-Management students and must be taken prior to or concurrently with this course. Non-Management students without the prerequisites will be deregistered from the course.

  • MGPO 438 Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation (3 credits)

    Offered by: Management (Desautels Faculty of Management)

    Overview

    Management Policy : Explores key concepts associated with social entrepreneurship and social innovation – the application of principles of entrepreneurship and innovation to solve social problems through social ventures, enterprises and not-for-profit organizations. Focuses on the social economy, including how the market system can be leveraged to create social value.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Anita Nowak (Fall) Madhurima Bhattacharyay, Hani Boulos (Winter)

    • Restriction(s): Open to U2, U3 students only. Students cannot receive credits if they already received credits for MGPO 434.

Complementary Courses (6 credits)

3 - 6 credits from the following:

  • MGPO 364 Entrepreneurship in Practice (3 credits)

    Offered by: Management (Desautels Faculty of Management)

    Overview

    Management Policy : Provides hands-on experience with the development of an entrepreneurial venture or a contribution to an existing entrepreneurial venture. Involves the creation of a venture development or business plan. Applicable to many kinds of new ventures, both private companies and social enterprises.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Jitender Gabriel Sundaram (Fall) Jitender Gabriel Sundaram (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: MGPO 362

    • Restriction(s): Open to U2, U3 students only.

  • SENT 499 Internship: Social Entrepreneurship (3 credits)

    Offered by: Arts - Dean's Office (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    SENT : The Social Entrepreneurship internship allows students to earn university credits while gaining experience working in areas relevant to the Minor Concentration in Social Entrepreneurship. Internships consist of a minimum of 150 hours of work with an approved host institution or organization.

    Terms: Fall 2017, Winter 2018

    Instructors: Jason Carmichael (Fall) Jason Carmichael (Winter)

    • Prior to taking SENT 499, all students must get permission from the Minor Concentration in Social Entrepreneurship Program Director. Registration note: For summer internships, students register for this course in the following fall semester.

    • Restriction(s): Only open to students in the B.A.; Minor Concentration in Social Entrepreneurship

0 - 3 credits from the following:

  • COMS 355 Media Governance (3 credits)

    Offered by: Art History & Communications (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Communication Studies : Electronic communications systems such as broadcasting, cable, telephony, and the Internet are vital public resources for social, economic, political, and cultural interaction in modern life. This course introduces students to the political and economic forces that govern policies about the flow of information, knowledge, and ideas using such media systems.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Roberta Lentz (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: Successful completion of COMS 210, COMS 200, or COMS 230.

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken COMS 365.

    • Note: Combined lecture and seminar format. Language of instruction is English. Maximum enrolment is 90.

  • COMS 492 Power, Difference and Justice (3 credits)

    Offered by: Art History & Communications (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Communication Studies : Media systems and their role in social relations of power and difference that are maintained and challenged through communication practices.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • ECON 310 Introduction to Behavioural Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : An introduction to economic decision-making in markets and strategic environments, including bounded rationality, individual decision-making under uncertainty, and behavioural game theory.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Jian Li (Fall)

    • Prerequisites: ECON 208 and a statistics course or permission of the instructor.

  • ECON 447 Economics of Information and Uncertainty (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : This course considers how uncertainty can be incorporated into the standard model of consumer and producer choice central to explaining or analysing a number of different economic phenomena. Topics include the information approach to explaining unemployment and problems in controlling health care costs.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Jian Li (Fall)

  • HIST 312 Hist of Consumption in Canada (3 credits)

    Offered by: History and Classical Studies (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    History : History of consumption in Canada since 1600 in relation to subsistence and the early market; modern class and gender relationships; conceptions of citizenship.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

  • LLCU 212 Understanding Digital and Social Media (3 credits)

    Offered by: Languages,Literatures,Cultures (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    LLCU : Lectures will explore a range of topics related to technologies of contemporary digital and social media, with particular attention to understanding technical, historical, ethical and legal issues. Tutorials will help students to express themselves effectively with digital media, and especially on the web (HTML, images, audio, video).

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Cecily Raynor (Fall)

    • Students need a laptop computer.

  • LLCU 311 Digital Studies/Citizenry (3 credits)

    Offered by: Languages,Literatures,Cultures (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    LLCU : This course will provide a conceptual and practical understanding of how to leverage technologies in a range of common activities such as searching, social networking, presenting, and creating web content. The emphasis will be on using and understanding digital technologies in effective and ethical ways in our digital society.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Christopher Gutierrez (Winter)

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken LLCU 211.

  • PHIL 237 Contemporary Moral Issues (3 credits)

    Offered by: Philosophy (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Philosophy : An introductory discussion of central ethical questions (the value of persons, or the relationship of rights and utilities, for example) through the investigation of currently disputed social and political issues. Specific issues to be discussed may include pornography and censorship, affirmative action, civil disobedience, punishment, abortion, and euthanasia.

    Terms: Winter 2018, Summer 2018

    Instructors: Mathieu Baril (Winter) Nicholas Dunn (Summer)

  • POLI 318 Comparative Local Government (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : An examination of the organization and conduct of local government in Canada, the United States, and selected European countries. Attention to theories of local government, the criteria for comparative analysis, the provision of public goods and bads, urban political patterns and the constitution of new institutional arrangements to deal with "urban crises" in North America.

    Terms: Fall 2017

    Instructors: Filippo Sabetti (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: POLI 211 or POLI 212 or written permission of instructor

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developed Areas; also in the field of Canadian Politics.

  • POLI 473 Democracy and the Market (3 credits)

    Offered by: Political Science (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Political Science : The course examines the relationship between economic and political change by focusing on dual processes of economic reform and democratization. The inter-play of societal, state-level and international actors, and the possible trade-offs involved, are explored using examples from Latin America, the former Soviet bloc, and other developing areas.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2017-2018 academic year.

    • Prerequisite: A course in Comparative Politics or written permission of the instructor

    • Note: The area in the field of Comparative Politics is Developing Areas.

  • SOCI 307 Globalization (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Socio-economic, political and cultural dynamics related to processes of globalization. An examination of the following: key theoretical foundations of the globalization debate; the extent and implications of economic globalization; global governance and the continuing relevance of nation-states; instances of transnational activism; the diffusion of cultural practices; patterns and management of global migration and mobility.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Jennifer Elrick (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: SOCI 210 or Permission of Instructor

  • SOCI 386 Contemporary Social Movements (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : This course will focus on contemporary social movements in Canada, the U.S., and Western Europe, such as the civil rights movement, the women's movement, and the environmental movement. Empirical studies of movements will be used to explore such general issues as how social movements emerge, grow, and decline.

    Terms: Winter 2018

    Instructors: Carl Eidlin (Winter)

Faculty of Arts—2017-2018 (last updated Aug. 23, 2017) (disclaimer)