Master of Science (M.Sc.); Public Health (Non-Thesis) — Population Dynamics (60 credits)

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Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics     Degree: Master of Science

Program Requirements

The Population Dynamics Option (PDO) is open to students in the M.Sc. in Public Health; Non-Thesis program in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health specializing in Population Dynamics. The purpose of this program is to provide graduate training in demographic methods (including life table analyses) and enhance students’ knowledge of critical population issues. Students will be required to take a course on demographic methods and an overview substantive course on the key population issues facing societies today. In addition, students will take one complementary course from Sociology; Economics; or Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health, which focuses on a particular population issue such as population health, migration, aging, family dynamics, and labour markets and skills acquisition. Students will attend at least five of the seminars given in the Social Statistics and Population Dynamics Seminar series. Research topics must be related to population dynamics and approved by the PDO coordinating committee.

Research Project (14 credits)

  • EPIB 630 Public Health Project (14 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Students will critically assess research and summarize the findings in a research paper on a health related topic from a public health perspective. Topic to be approved by faculty member who will direct student and evaluate the paper.

    Terms: Fall 2014, Winter 2015, Summer 2015

    Instructors: Rebecca Fuhrer, Joseph Cox (Fall) Rebecca Fuhrer, Joseph Cox (Winter) Rebecca Fuhrer, Joseph Cox (Summer)

    • Restriction: Open to students registered in the M.Sc. in Public Health; Non-Thesis and M.Sc. in Public Health; Non-Thesis - Environment

Required Courses (31 credits)

Students exempted from any of the courses listed below must replace them with additional complementary course credits.

  • EPIB 601 Fundamentals of Epidemiology (4 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : This course aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to epidemiologic concepts and corresponding terms. After an introduction to the history, definition, and purposes of epidemiology, "core" concepts that are relevant in several areas of investigation (e.g., etiologic research, health care research, and community medicine practice) will be presented.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Jenna Chun-Lay Wong, Anna Syrowatka, Alissa Koski, Arijit Nandi, Seungmi Yang (Fall)

    • Corequisites: EPIB 602 and EPIB 607

    • Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 606. Open to students in Epidemiology or Biostatistics programs, or permission of instructor.

  • EPIB 602 Foundations of Population Health (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Introduction to global population health, including causes of morbidity and mortality, surveillance systems and vital statistics, and trends over time. Overviews of epidemiology of cancer, cardiovascular, infectious, environmental, psychiatric and nutritional diseases. Fundamentals and methods for studying burden of disease in populations, and how these differ across time, space, groups.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Gilles Paradis (Fall)

  • EPIB 603 Intermediate Epidemiology (4 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Concepts and methods for epidemiology at the intermediate level, including causation, measures of disease occurrence and effect, study designs, biases in epidemiologic research, interaction, and data analysis for categorical and survival data using statistical software.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Samuel Harper (Winter)

  • EPIB 605 Critical Appraisal in Epidemiology (1 credit)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : This course provides the opportunity to develop skills to critically evaluate evidence presented in the biomedical and health sciences literature, based on the concepts acquired in the epidemiology introductory courses.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Maida Sewitch, Bethany Joy Foster, Elham Rahme (Winter)

  • EPIB 607 Inferential Statistics (4 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Introduction to the basic principles of statistical inference used in clinical and epidemiologic research. Topics include variability; methods of processing and describing data; sampling and sampling distributions; inferences regarding means and proportions, non-parametric methods, regression and correlation.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Paramita Saha Chaudhuri (Fall)

    • Prerequisite (Undergraduate): A first year course in undergraduate differential and integral calculus.

  • EPIB 612 Principles of Public Health Practice (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Principles and methods in public health practice. Topics will include investigation in public health, public health intervention, program evaluation, public health and the health care system, society and public health.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Joseph Cox, Faisca Richer (Winter)

    • Corequisites: EPIB 601, EPIB 602, and EPIB 607 or permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Open only to students in the MSc and PhD programs in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health. Open to students in other disciplines with permission of instructor.

  • EPIB 613 Introduction to Statistical Software (1 credit)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Introduction to statistical software and data management; including basics of entering, manipulating data and elementary statistical analysis, SAS software, with reference to other packages of potential interest to students (R, Stata, SPSS).

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Arijit Nandi, Seungmi Yang (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: Enrolment in Epidemiology stream program or permission of instructor.

  • EPIB 614 Basics of Measurement in Epidemiology (1 credit)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : The course will review principles that can be applied to measuring a wide range of exposures, as well as outcomes. Accurate measurement is essential to the validity of epidemiological research.Topics to be covered include measurement error, and the design, analysis, and interpretation of validity and reliability studies.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Jane McCusker (Winter)

    • Prerequisites: EPIB 601, EPIB 602 and EPIB 607

    • Restriction: Open only to students in the M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health.

  • EPIB 621 Data Analysis in Health Sciences (4 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Univariate and multivariate statistical techniques for continuous categorical and survival data. Topics include generalized linear models, multiple linear and logistic regression, introductory survival analysis, model selection. Maximum likelihood and Bayesean approaches will be presented.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Lawrence Joseph (Winter)

  • SOCI 545 Sociology of Population (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : The classic literature of sociology of population. Drawing reciprocal linkages between social and population processes: Historical, family and labour force demography, demographic and fertility transitions, mortality, ethnic and race relations, gender, macro-structural interaction theory, and the relation of population and the environment.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Shelley Clark (Fall)

  • SOCI 626 Demographic Methods (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Introduction to demographic measurement and modeling. Course covers direct and indirect estimation, standardization, life table construction, and population projections.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sarah Brauner-Otto (Winter)

    • Specific topics may vary from semester to semester.

Complementary Courses (15 credits)

12 credits of coursework at the 500 level or higher, with a minimum of 2 credits chosen from each of the following fields:

Environmental health sciences;
Health services research policy and management;
Population and public health interventions (social and behavioural science);
Epidemiology in practice or field epidemiology.

Courses must be approved by the program's academic adviser.

3 credits of coursework, at the 500 level or higher, from the list of courses approved for the Population Dynamics Option that have not been taken to satisfy other program requirements:

  • ECON 622 Public Finance (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A survey of the role of government in the economy (excluding the macroeconomic side - stabilization, etc.). Topics include markets and market failure; public goods; externalities; the theory of the second-best and the study of collective choice, including voting; and the collection of revenue to finance government activity, including optimal taxation of commodities and income.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

  • ECON 634 Economic Development 3 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A systematic treatment of the characteristics and problems of economic development in underdeveloped countries.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Sonia Laszlo (Fall)

  • ECON 641 Labour Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : A synthesis of theoretical developments in the area of labour economics with stress upon problems of empirical testing.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Fabian Lange (Winter)

  • ECON 734 Economic Development 4 (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Problems of economic growth and planning in selected underdeveloped countries. Topics covered vary from year to year in response to student interests; growth, poverty and income distribution, LDC labour markets and institutions, trade and development, international debt problems, issues in trade policy.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Sonia Laszlo (Winter)

  • ECON 741 Advanced Labour Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Selected theoretical and policy issues in labour economics.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

  • ECON 742 Empirical Microeconomics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : Surveys the empirical techniques used in applied microeconomic fields, particularly development and labour economics. Focus is on the formulation of empirical models derived from economic theory, and on various estimation methodologies, including panel data econometrics, limited dependent variable models, and duration analysis. A "hands on" approach is emphasized.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Saraswata Chaudhuri (Winter)

  • ECON 744 Health Economics (3 credits)

    Offered by: Economics (Faculty of Arts)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Economics (Arts) : The emphasis will be on describing and analyzing the structure and performance of the Canadian health system, though some attention will be given to recent attempts by the federal and provincial governments to deal with current problems in this field. Readings will be selected from the economics and health literature.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

  • EPIB 525 Health Care Systems in Comparative Perspective (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Comparative perspective to illustrate processes involved in the development and evolution of health care systems around the world. Countries examined will represent different welfare state regimes, health care system typologies, levels of development and wealth.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Amélie Quesnel Vallée (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken SOCI 525.

    • Note: This course is cross-listed in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health and in Sociology

  • EPIB 527 Economics for Health Services Research and Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Key health policy topics in developed economies using analytic frameworks and tools from economics. Major topics include health insurance, health care financing, and the roles of individuals and public and private institutions in the health care system.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Erin Strumpf (Winter)

    • NOTE: This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates from all departments, with the permission of the instructor. A background in introductory economics is useful, though not required.

  • EPIB 528 Economic Evaluation of Health Programs (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Concepts and methods used to carry out economic evaluations of health programs and interventions, including public health interventions, pharmaceuticals, and other health care interventions. Includes topics such as calculation of unit costs, measurement of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and assessment of uncertainty in cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Eric A Latimer (Fall)

    • No prior background in economics is required.

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

    • Restriction: Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates from all departments.

  • EPIB 529 Global Environmental Health and Burden of Disease (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : This course presents the grand challenges in global health from environmental and occupational risks along with the multi-disciplinary methods used to identify, control, and prevent them. It will introduce students to knowledge and skills in core disciplines of environmental health and approaches to environmental risk recognition, control and prevention in a global context.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Jill Baumgartner (Winter)

    • Permission of instructor required for undergraduate students.

    • This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates from all departments.

    • Previous coursework in statistics and environmental science is useful, though not required.

  • EPIB 615 Introduction to Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Introduction to the field of infectious disease epidemiology taught from a public health perspective. Topics include analytic methods, study design, outbreak investigations, surveillance, vaccine development and evaluations, screening, modelling, and infectious causes of cancer or chronic diseases.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Caroline Quach-Thanh (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: EPIB 601 or Permission of Instructor.

    • Note: An undergraduate level biology course is highly recommended.

  • EPIB 648 Methods in Social Epidemiology (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : Methods for conducting studies in social epidemiology and population health will be covered. Topics will include causal inference; measurement and concepts of social exposures; methods for study design and analysis. Techniques for descriptive and etiologic investigations of socioeconomic position, gender, race and ethnicity, geography, and social policies will be discussed.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Samuel Harper, Jay Kaufman (Fall)

  • EPIB 681 Global Health: Epidemiological Research (3 credits)

    Offered by: Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Faculty of Medicine)

    Administered by: Graduate Studies

    Overview

    Epidemiology & Biostatistics : A review of selected epidemiological research focussing on global health and disease topics. Research will be mostly from developing countries and research methods will be highlighted. Case studies will be used to illustrate specific applications and challenges.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Serene Joseph, Madhukar Pai (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: With permission of instructor.

  • SOCI 512 Ethnicity & Public Policy (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Major themes in the theoretical literature on ethnicity. Public policies with direct and indirect implications for inter-ethnic relations will be studied. Policies affecting areas such as language, education, immigration, employment and promotion, multiculturalism and welfare. Examples drawn from several multi-ethnic societies. Political, constitutional, and economic problems associated with these policy initiatives.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Morton Weinfeld (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: SOCI 230 or permission from the instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who have taken SOCI 629.

  • SOCI 513 Social Aspects HIV/AIDS in Africa (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Examination of the social causes and consequences of HIV/AIDS in Africa. Gender inequality, sexual behaviours, marriage systems, migration, and poverty are shaping the pandemic as well as how the pandemic is altering social, demographic and economic conditions across Africa.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

  • SOCI 520 Migration and Immigrant Groups (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Review of the major demographic, economic and sociological theories of internal and international migration. The main emphasis will be on empirical research on migration and immigrant groups.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Thomas Soehl (Winter)

    • Prerequisite: 15 credits in the Social Sciences

  • SOCI 525 Health Care Systems in Comparative Perspective (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : Comparative perspective to illustrate processes involved in the development and evolution of health care systems around the world. Countries examined will represent different welfare state regimes, health care system typologies, levels of development and wealth.

    Terms: Fall 2014

    Instructors: Amélie Quesnel Vallée (Fall)

    • Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

    • Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken EPIB 525.

    • Note: This course is cross-listed in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health and in Sociology.

  • SOCI 535 Sociology of the Family (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : This seminar reviews literature on major research areas in family. The course examines families in the past, the study of family using a life course approach, and considers selective areas which may have had significant influences on contemporary family such as work and family, family violence, and cultural variation in families.

    Terms: This course is not scheduled for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    Instructors: There are no professors associated with this course for the 2014-2015 academic year.

    • Undergraduate students require permission of instructor

  • SOCI 588 Biosociology/Biodemography (3 credits)

    Offered by: Sociology (Faculty of Arts)

    Overview

    Sociology (Arts) : This course will explore linkages between social and biological systems, their influence on health and well-being over the life course, and on health disparities. Topics include classical sociological approaches to biosocial processes, sociobiology (reductionist, but population-based), and newer demographic studies on gen-environment, epigenetic, and stress-metabolic/allostatic processes.

    Terms: Winter 2015

    Instructors: Aniruddha Das (Winter)

Faculty of Medicine—2014-2015 (last updated Feb. 18, 2014) (disclaimer)