Coronavirus (COVID-19) updates

› Get the latest Covid-19 updates and learn what to expect for McGill’s return to campus this Fall 2021.

› For Faculty of Science FAQs (including S/U info), please visit https://www.mcgill.ca/science/covid-19.

Hot Science, Cool Talks: request a talk

Please note that in light of COVID-19, Hot Science, Cool Talks has moved online. Talks are 30-60 minutes in length.

Presented by McGill scientists (faculty, staff, graduate students and Post Docs), Hot Science/Cool talks are suitable for high school, college (CEGEP) and adult audiences. There are a few talks under Biology that are geared towards grades 4-6.

Speakers are available from September to June and all online talks are free.

These talks are given in English. For talks given in French, click on « Fr » in the top right-hand corner of this page.

To request an online talk, please consult the list of topics and fill out the form below.


Please consult the list of topics, choose the two (2) talks that interest you the most and note down their titles. You will need to type or copy-paste these titles into the boxes below as your first and second choices.

  • Title: Liars, cheaters, theives: the hidden side of pollination.

Presenter: Dr. Anna Hargreaves (faculty).

Pollination is a mutualism, but many plants and animals will trick their way to success if they can. We'll talk weird flowers & surprising culprits... 

Audience: High School (Sec. III-V), adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in Spanish.


  • Title: What if we lost just a tad(pole): the effects of toad tadpoles on the environment.

Presenter: Jessica Ford (grad student).

Tadpoles are small and only live in ponds temporarily, can they really make a difference? We will discuss the changes to the ecosystem that occur when we lose toad tadpoles, as well as why frogs and toads are disappearing, and the conservation work we are doing to help an endangered toad population.

Audience: Elementary, high School (Sec. I-V), adults. Length: 30-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Keeping up with the risk and spread of infectious diseases in Ontario and Quebec.

Presenter: Kirsten Crandall (grad student).

Over the past decade, the number of people becoming sick with infectious diseases transmitted by ticks (like Lyme disease) in Canada has rapidly increased. How is disease transmitted by ticks? Why are mammals a big part of the problem? How can we protect ourselves when we are out in nature?

Audience: High School (Sec. III-V), adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: The vigorous shake that could save onions.

Presenter: Anthony Iheonye (grad student).

The talk describes how we could improve the quality of dry food products by using an innovative drying method. This drying method preserves the color and nutrient content of dry foods, heating the food material uniformly. During the talk, i would explain how and why this heating method vigorously shakes onions in order to improve its quality.

Audience: High School (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Tracking wildlife: what two decades of data on a single species can tell us about animal movement.

Presenter: Nathalie Jreidini (grad student).

Ecologists use trackers to monitor all sorts of animal populations - but why do we care about tracking animals? We will talk about climate impact, dispersal patterns and how monitoring a single population has led us to revisit theories about animal movement. I won’t reveal the species I am talking about right away - you’ll have to take a guess!

Audience: CEGEP (Grades 12-13/college level). Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • What can we learn from spider webs? Charles Cong Xu, PhD student

Do you know what a spider eats? I will tell you about how scientists are finding brand new ways to figure this out and how it can help us study and protect wild species.

Learn about: spiders, biodiversity, species protection. Audience: Elementary


  • Using DNA to discover, study and protect biodiversity. Charles Cong Xu, PhD Student

I'll give a brief summary of who I am, where I am from, and the kinds of research I do in environmental DNA and metagenomics. (And what that means!)

Learn about: environmental DNA, biodiversity, life as a scientist. Audiences: Secondary, CEGEP, adult.

  • Title: Virtual chemistry: a safer, faster, cheaper and cleaner chemistry and its application to pharmaceutical discovery.

Presenter: Dr. Nicolas Moitessier (faculty).

Discovering new molecules as effective medications requires a lot of trial-and-error organic chemistry and biology, and remains associated with low success rates. Testing/simulating experiments before running experiments is an attractive approach. What if software could guide scientists in their discoveries? Learn how the the use of computers to solve chemistry problems is being applied to drug discovery.

Audience: CEGEP (Grades 12-13/college level). Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in French.


 

  • COVID-19 Q&A. Jonathan Jarry, Office for Science and Society

The news surrounding COVID-19 is rapidly evolving and there is much to break down in the science behind the Coronavirus. Students have questions and concerns: Jonathan Jarry helps address them.

Learn about: viruses, pandemics, epidemiology, health guidelines. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.

  • Title: Bubble, bubble, toil and eruption . . . from champagne to volcanoes.

Presenter: Dr. Don Baker (faculty). 

The formation of bubbles plays a fundamental role in controlling volcanic eruptions; similar processes occur when a champagne bottle is opened. I will discuss how my studies on the formation and evolution of bubbles in the laboratory, and by computer simulation, help us understand how bubbles affect volcanic eruptions. The goal of the research is to better understand how bubbles form and interconnect, with the hope that such knowledge will help us better predict the intensity of volcanic eruptions.

Audience(s): High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adult. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: How does nature grow giant (2 m) crystals? 

Presenter: Dr. Don Baker (faculty).

Rare igneous (fire-formed) rocks called pegmatites are notable because they can contain individual crystals meters in size — the same size as the rocks themselves, even though they cooled and crystallized on time scales as short as weeks to months. The formation of these giant crystals remain enigmatic, but I will discuss how our research in the lab at the micron scale sheds light on the origin of these meter-scale crystals.

Audience(s): High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adult. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Picky eaters: understanding the diet of marine microorganisms.

Presenter: Dr. Nagissa Mahmoudi (faculty).

My talk focuses on research that examines what microbes are eating in the ocean and what that means for oil spills/climate change. 

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Global warming: we've had this coming for a long time.

Presenter: Dr. Nicolas Cowan (faculty).

I will explain the 19th century physics that led to the first prediction of global warming, and the 20th century confirmation of this prediction.

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: The search for life around other stars.

Presenter: Dr. Nicolas Cowan (faculty).

I will describe how we measure the properties of planets tens of light years away, and how we can search them for signs of life.

Audience: High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Methane: the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Presenter: Dr. Peter Douglas (faculty).

Methane is an source of energy and a greenhouse gas. By better understanding how it enters the atmosphere we can help stop global warming.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: What molecules in mud can tell us about the Ancient Maya.

Presenter: Dr. Peter Douglas (faculty).

The amazing cities of the Ancient Maya mysteriously fell into ruin 100 years ago — measurements of mud can help us understand why.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Chasing water on Mars with lasers.

Presenter: Debarati Das (graduate student).

My research focuses on measuring boron in the rocks of Gale crater to understand past water activity on Mars. Boron, a highly water-soluble element, tells us about Martian habitability through water properties and composition. I use data collected by the laser on the Curiosity rover to identify new boron-rich areas. I also study Martian geochemistry examples from Earth and samples from Death Valley to understand processes that caused boron enrichment on Mars.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Exploration of Mars and Venus.

Presenter: Thomas Navarro (post doc).

Mars and Venus are the closets planets to Earth. How did we learn what we know today about those planets in 60 years of space exploration? What happens next?

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Surviving Snowball Earth.

Presenter: Maxwell Lechte (post doc).

Hundreds of millions of years ago, when complex life was first beginning to evolve, the world froze over completely. This event known as "Snowball Earth" threatened the survival of life on Earth. Clues found in rocks deposited by ancient glaciers provide answers to how life survived this extreme ice age.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: How to destroy a rock (and your equipment) in hyperacidic water.

Presenter: Vincent Van Hinsberg (faculty).

Kawah Ijen volcano in Indonesia has the largest hyperacidic lake in the world. Water from this lake seeps out and reacts with rocks and soils with a negative environmental impact. However, the lake also provides us with an opportunity to understand how volcanoes work and to monitor their hazards.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Ocean acidifcation: The indisputable problem!

Presenter: Alfonso Mucci (faculty).

Ocean Acidification (OA) is seen as the other carbon dioxide (CO2) problem. Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 decreases the pH, carbonate ion concentration and saturation state of surface ocean waters with respect to calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals. OA is a potential threat to the health of marine ecosystems, notably to calcifying organisms whose ability to secrete their CaCO3 skeletons might be hindered. OA also triggers the dissolution of carbonate minerals on the seafloor, neutralizing man-made CO2. OA threatens the marine food chain and may lead to the demise of coral reefs.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).

  • Title: Bogs - how can something so dead be that important.

Presenter: Dr. Nigel Roulet (faculty).

Bogs are peatlands that contain over 20% of the world's biological carbon. However, they are threatened by climate and land-use change.

Audience: High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Urbanization strategies on the African continent: new city-building as a pervasive trend

Presenter: Laurence Côté-Roy (graduate student).

The African continent is one of the fastest urbanizing regions of the world. According to the predictions of global consultancies and financial institutions, the continent is poised for unprecedented economic growth. Despite this optimistic prognosis, the continent is deeply affected by challenges related to its rapid and uncontrolled urbanization. This talk investigates an increasingly popular strategy adopted to manage urbanization and fuel economic growth in several African countries: the creation of brand new cities. This presentation outlines the main drivers and actors supporting this trend and investigates some of the dominant narratives behind new city-building. With 40 new city projects planned or underway across the continent, the new city-building trend has tangible impacts on national development agendas as well as local populations, generating new forms of opportunities and exclusions.

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 60-90 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in French.


  • Title: New city-building past & present: from yesterday’s utopias to today’s models.

Presenter: Laurence Côté-Roy (graduate student).

So-called ‘new’ city-building has a rather long history. This presentation will review some of the most salient examples of new city-building since the Post Second World War era to the latest movement in new-city creation in emerging economies of the Global South, which began in the early 1990s. Through this talk, I will highlight the characteristics of various prolific city-building periods throughout modern planning’s history and highlight how perceptions of new city-building and rationales for project development have shifted over time - influenced by trends in planning and architecture. 

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 60-90 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in French.


  • Title: Fertilizers, Farming and Food: Feeding the world more efficiently.

Presenter: Sibeal McCourt (graduate student).

We are growing more food globally than ever before. However, the global supply chain that gets food from farms to people's plates can be inefficient. This results in pollution, and higher food costs. This talk will explore how we can make our food system more environmentally-friendly, focusing on the role of fertilizers in our food system.

Audience: Sec. III-V, CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Fractals and Hausdorff dimension.

Presenter: Dr. Dimitry Jakobson (faculty).

Fractal sets have non-integer dimension. If you magnify a small piece, you get an exact copy of the original set! Many examples will be described. 

Audience: High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 60-90 minutes (including questions).


 

  • Lessons Learned from an Accidental Career in Medical Journalism. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

Is most published research wrong? Sometimes it seems that way. Almost every food has at one point been shown to both cause and prevent cancer. So how does this happen? In this talk we will look at how some famous studies got it so wrong. We will try to understand why chocolate probably won’t help you win a Nobel prize, why red wine might not be that heart healthy, and why cell phones likely don’t cause cancer.

Learn about: experimental design, the process of science, health guidelines. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • The Tragic Myths about Vaccines. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

Vaccines are probably one of the great public health achievements of the 20th century. They have saved, who knows how many lives over the past 50 years. And yet people are terrified of them. After having wiped out diseases like smallpox and polio, diseases on the verge of extinction like measles are making a comeback. In this presentation we will answer some of the common questions and concerns surrounding vaccination including mercury and other metals in vaccines, the threat of autism, why we vaccinate infants, and why alternative vaccine schedules are problematic.

Learn about: vaccines, epidemiology, immunity. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • Exercise: yes it’s tough, but it actually works. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

If you watch the news, you will slowly come to believe that everything is bad for you. At some point, everything has caused cancer. But the one thing that is almost universally acknowledged to be good for you is exercise. Exercise is good, not just for heart health, but also for healthy bones, lung function, preventing dementia, cancer and arthritis. So why don’t we do it more? Some may be worried they are too old and some may worry that they are not in good enough health to exercise. In this talk we will look at how and how often to exercise because the reality is that exercise is generally only bad for your health if you don’t do it.

Learn about: exercise, health, immunity. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • Cardiovascular Disease in Women. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer in women and yet few women are aware of the risks. But how much of what you’ve heard is actually true? Do most heart attacks come on with no warning? Are women less likely to have chest pain when they have heart disease? Does the birth control pill and hormone replacement therapy increase the risk of heart disease? Have most cardiac medications not been tested on women? Do women do worse after a heart attack compared to men?

Learn about: cardiac health, women's health. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • The Cholesterol Conundrum. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

One week eggs are good for you, the next week eggs are bad for you. It’s impossible to keep up. Why has cholesterol been so controversial? Why is cholesterol so hotly debated whereas the other cardiac risk factors like diabetes, hypertension, and smoking don’t generate the same vicious arguments? In this talk we will look at the roots of the apparent cholesterol controversy and see why the lipid hypothesis has been so problematic over the years. We will also see what the latest scientific research says about treating cholesterol and look at why statins have gotten such bad press over the years.

Learn about: cardiovascular health, cholesterol, scientific controversies. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • Lies, Damn lies, and Statistics: The Challenge of Science Communication. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

Why is it so hard to communicate science to the public? Part of the problem is that medical research can sometimes be wrong. Whether we are talking about how eating chocolate can help you win a Nobel prize or whether coffee can cause a heart attack, sometimes what we hear on the news is not the whole story.

Learn about: science communication, scientific controversies. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • The Cardiac Complications of Anti-Inflammatories. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

Common pain medications like Advil or Aleve are great for relieving arthritis pain or headache. But are they safe? Do they increase the risk of heart disease and raise the blood pressure? And if they aren’t safe, what alternatives are out there?

Learn about: pain medications, safety, scientific controversies. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • The Health Effects of Climate Change: How to Ask the Right Questions. Christopher Labos, MDCM MSc FRCPC, Office for Science and Society

Does climate change and pollution affect our health? Absolutely. But how do we approach the problem. Are all the studies on the issue reliable? How can we approach such a broad topic.

Learn about: climate change, health, scientific controversies. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • Title: Legionnaires' disease: why we need better ways to detect bacteria.

Presenter: Mariam Saad (graduate student)

Legionella are waterborne bacteria that cause a severe lung infection known as Legionnaires' Disease. This disease is rapidly spreading worldwide. To stop these bacteria from continuing to spread, it is important to find them and know exactly how many we are dealing with. Traditional ways to find Legionella are slow, tedious and expensive. It is time to discuss technologies that will help us find Legionella faster and more efficiently.

Audience: Sec. I-V, CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes.


  • Title: The Evolution of You.

Presenter: Christie Lovat (staff)

A summary and discussion of our current knowledge of human evolution. From our earliest attempts to understand our origins, to the ancient DNA revolution, and the latest developments in our understanding of the human family tree. Come discover how Homo sapiens came to be, and how we have come to dominate the globe.

Audience: Sec. I-V, CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes.

Talk title: Parasites... the word alone elicits feelings of disgust, but what are they really? 

Speaker: Marcus Kaji (graduate student)

Journey with me as we explore the world of intestinal blood-feeding hookworms. How do they survive and reproduce inside their host, and how do we use our understanding of molecular biology to develop new drugs to fight off infection?

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: How does nicotine make people addicted to cigarettes?

Presenter: Dr. Paul Clarke (faculty)

Tobacco smoking is a complex behavior, affected by many factors, but fundamentally dependent on nicotine. Nicotine acts on nicotinic receptors and thereby stimulates brain reward pathways (dopamine, etc). Does this apply to electronic cigarettes?

Audience: CEGEP (Grades 12-13/college level). Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: The secret language of lab rats.

Presenter: Dr. Paul Clarke (faculty)

Lab rats "speak" at a frequency beyond our hearing range. How can scientists try to decipher what the rats are talking about?

Audience: CEGEP (Grades 12-13/college level). Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Why light Matters and Why We Should Conserve It. Hanna Fronenberg, PhD student

We humans have been studying light from the cosmos for millennia. But why? Why is light so important and what does it tell us about our universe? Learn about the discoveries we have been able to make using light from the night sky, and the risk light pollution poses to all types of observations.

Learn about: observations using light,light pollution. Audiences: Secondary, CEGEP.


  • The search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Sabrina Berger, PhD student

This talk will describe some of the major scientific projects on Earth to look for intelligent extraterrestrial life. We will discuss the scientific and philosophical motivation and background to search for these signals. We will also explain why we search for them with light we cannot see called radio waves, which your cell phone relies on. You'll leave the class with an understanding of our search for these intriguing signals and perhaps even a newfound drive to join the effort!

Learn about: radio waves, signals from space, citizen science. Audiences: Secondary, CEGEP, adult.


  • Using mammoth machines to study the tiniest of particles. Lia Formenti, PhD Student

Particle physics is the study of the smallest building blocks of matter in the Universe. The machines and technology humanity has come up to do so are awesome! Here, you'll learn about an international-scale project that Canada is involved in to improve the world's largest particle physics experiment at the world's largest particle collider at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland.

Learn about: particle physics, particle colliders, CERN. Audiences: Secondary, CEGEP, adult.


  • Watching the universe grow up using radio waves. Adrian Liu, Assistant Professor.

How big is our Universe? How old is it? How do we use telescopes to look into the past, and how far can we look? How did the universe transform from its "baby" state to the its currently majestic adulthood?

Learn about: radio waves, telescopes, changes in our universe. Other physics topics available. Audiences: Sec III-V, CEGEP, adult.


  • Title: Mathematical physics: From Pythagoras to string theory.

Presenter: Anh-Khoi Trinh (graduate student).

Physics and mathematics have shared an intrinsic bond since the inception of Physics. I will present aspects of string theory and frame it in this context.

Audience: adults. Length: 60-90 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Exoplanet hunting.

Presenter: Lisa Dang (graduate student).

In 1995, the first planet orbiting another star was discovered. Today, almost 4000 exoplanets have been confirmed. Find out how we discover them!

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in French.


  • Title: Black holes don't suck.

Presenter: Dr. Daryl Haggard (faculty).

Black holes are some of the most exotic objects in our Universe, but also some of the simplest. One thing they are not? Cosmic vacuum cleaners!

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: CHIME: probing the radio sky.

Presenter: Charanjot Brar (staff)

This talk will focus on how to build a radio telescope and how to do astronomy in the age of immense data!

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Weather, macroweather, climate: our random yet predictable atmosphere.

Presenter: Dr. Shaun Lovejoy (faculty).

A popular saying is “the climate is what you expect, the weather is what you get”. Based on a new popular book, we will show why this is wrong.

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in French.


  • Title: Global warming: we've had this coming for a long time.

Presenter: Dr. Nicolas Cowan (faculty).

I will explain the 19th century physics that led to the first prediction of global warming, and the 20th century confirmation of this prediction.

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: The search for life around other stars.

Presenter: Dr. Nicolas Cowan (faculty).

I will describe how we measure the properties of planets tens of light years away, and how we can search them for signs of life.

Audience: High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: The wave, particle, and mechanical properties of light.

Presenter: Dr. Jack Sankey (faculty).

Depending on the situation, light can behave like a wave or a "quantum" particle. Additionally, it can actually push things around (helping to give comets their tails!). In this talk, I will discuss the physics of light and how we can use its mechanical properties to control the motion of solid objects in the lab.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Small is bigger.

Presenter: Dr. Peter Grutter (faculty).

We are presently living at the dawn of a new age. The societal impact of the Nanotechnology Age is expected to be larger than that of all of life sciences and IT in the past 50 years! Nanotechnology allows us to image, measure and control matter at the nano-meter (i.e. atomic) length scale. Small is different! I will describe how these nano abilities allow us to create structures with amazing properties, leading to huge opportunities as well as challenges in material science, medicine and information technology.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Fast Probes, Big Discoveries.

Presenter: Benjamin Dringoli (grad student).

Light in various forms has become an irreplaceable tool for the study of material properties. By using different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum and building experiments based around light's unique properties, science at the smallest scale (but with large impact) can be understood for the first time.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Neutrinos 101: How to Catch a Ghost.

Presenter: Soud Alkharusi (grad student).

Billions of neutrinos pass through us every second, so why did it take us so long to notice? This talk will give an overview of neutrinos and their special place in particle physics and the universe. We will also briefly go over current experiments and open questions.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Smashing very small things together really hard: why?

Presenter: Nicolas Fortier (grad student).

An overview of why colliding particles together is a thing (and obviously also why it's important), which will include topics such as matter (energy), velocity (relativity), and forces (amongst other things).

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Quantum machine learning: Artificial Intelligence enters the Quantum World.

Presenter: Michael Hilke (faculty).

I present here the basics and applications of machine learning together as well as quantum information in the context of new quantum technologies. This leads to the exciting prospect of combining quantumness into machine learning with new applications in technology and everyday experiences.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Zooming in to Canada's Role in the Future of Particle Physics.

Presenter: Lia Formenti (grad student).

CERN is the home base of an international collaboration studying the smallest building blocks of matter using the world's largest particle accelerator. At McGill, we are testing a new set of Canadian-made particle detectors to be installed at CERN by the end of 2021. In this talk, I'll introduce CERN, the ATLAS experiment, and what Canada is in the process of contributing, real time.

Audience: High school (Sec. III-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Mindfulness for weight loss and healthy eating.

Presenter: Kimberley Carrière (graduate student).

How can different types of mindfulness exercises help us to lose weight and eat better?

Audience: CEGEP, adults. Length: 60-90 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Perfectionism: the "good", the bad, the ugly.

Presenter: Shelby Levine (graduate student).

My research explores the influence of multidimensional perfectionism on mental health in adolescence and emerging adulthood. 

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: The stressed-out brain: how stress affects mind and behaviour.

Presenter: Dr. Mario Bogdanov (Post-Doc).

This talk is about what happens in the brain when we experience stress and how it changes learning, memory and decision-making processes. 

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions). This talk is also available in German.


  • Title: Boosting brain power? How non-invasive brain stimulation may alter behavior.

Presenter: Dr. Mario Bogdanov (Post-Doc).

This talk is about brain stimulation techniques used in research and therapy, and how they affect cognitive processes. 

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Mindfulness, Contemplation, and Creating a Kinder World.

Presenter: Syeda Shireen (Grad student)

I will discuss the importance of self-reflection and contemplation, specifically through mindfulness as a tool and way of life in the development of self-awareness, kindness, and wisdom. I will offer a discussion of these topics within the context of Maslow's hierarchy of needs that culminates in the less well-known stage of self-transcendence that is crucial to the spread of prosociality and compassion within our society.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).


  • Title: Blind at first sight? The role of positivity and accuracy of first impressions in romantic interest.

Presenter: Lauren Gazzard (Grad student)

On a first date, is it only important to see a person positively or is it beneficial to accurately perceive their personality as well? Using three speed-dating samples where participants briefly met with and rated the personalities of opposite-sex dating partners, we found that forming more positive personality impressions of potential dating partners was associated with greater romantic interest. In contrast, viewing a potential dating partner more accurately, or more in line with their unique personality, was associated with significantly less romantic interest. This was especially the case for potential partners whose personalities were less romantically appealing, specifically, for those who were lower in extraversion. Thus, on a first date, it may be more romantically beneficial to form a positive, yet inaccurate, first impression.

Audience: High school (Sec. I-V), CEGEP, adults. Length: 45-60 minutes (including questions).



:
:
Back to top