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Improving Access to Health Services in English through e-Training: Dialogue McGill and Cégep à distance Embark on CEGEP Tour

Dialogue McGill and Cégep à distance recently kicked off a tour of CEGEPs to promote free digital curriculum tools designed to help French-speaking persons to enhance their ability to provide services to English-speaking clients within Quebec’s health network.

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Published: 13 Jun 2018

McGill University to partner with industry in developing virtual-reality training platform for spinal surgery

McGill University today announces an agreement with CAE Healthcare, and DePuy Synthes Products, Inc., part of the Johnson & Johnson Medical Devices Companies, to develop a Virtual Reality (VR) platform to train orthopedic and neurosurgeons in advanced spinal surgery techniques....

Published: 11 Jun 2018

AIDS and aging focus of research study

By Neuro Staff

When the general public thinks of HIV, they do not think of a neurological disease, yet people living with HIV infection know they need to worry about their brain health.

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Published: 8 Jun 2018

No grain self-sufficiency in China without changes to land policies

If China is to achieve its target of 95% grain self-sufficiency by 2030 it will need to restrict the conversion of arable land to other uses say researchers from McGill. This may prove challenging in a country with a population of almost 1.4 billion, but with just under 13% of arable land, close to half of which is suffering from soil degradation....

Published: 7 Jun 2018

Male guppies grow larger brains in response to predator exposure

Male guppies exposed to predators in the wild or in captivity have heavier brains than those living in relatively predator-free conditions, according to new research published in the journal Functional Ecology.

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Published: 4 Jun 2018

Bright warning colours on poison dart frogs also act as camouflage

Poison dart frogs are well known for their deadly toxins and bright colours, which have made them a classic example of warning coloration.

The Dyeing Dart Frog, for example, is highly toxic and warns its predators with a bright yellow-and-black pattern.

However, new research led by scientists at the University of Bristol has revealed that the colour pattern does more than simply signal “danger”. Counterintuitively, it also works as camouflage.

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Published: 4 Jun 2018

Older men with higher levels of sex hormones could be less religious

The level of sex hormones such as testosterone in a man's body could influence his religiosity. A new study by Aniruddha Das of McGill University in the Springer journal Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology adds to the growing body of evidence that religiosity is influenced not only by upbringing or psychological makeup, but that physiological factors could also play a role.

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Published: 1 Jun 2018

Canadians are aging well, but …

It's not every day that one receives a call from a researcher asking if they want to participate in a study on aging for the next 20 years of their lives. That's what 50,000 Canadians aged 45 to 85 have agreed to do in taking part of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA), one of the largest and most comprehensive studies on the health and well-being of the country’s aging population.

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Published: 31 May 2018

The secret to longevity is in the microbiome and the gut

You are what you eat. Or so the saying goes. Science now tells us that we are what the bacteria living in our intestinal tract eat and this could have an influence on how well we age. Building on this, McGill University scientists fed fruit flies with a combination of probiotics and an herbal supplement called Triphala that was able to prolong the flies’ longevity by 60 % and protect them against chronic diseases associated with aging.

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Published: 31 May 2018

Pain-induced changes in the brain’s opioid system may explain the limited effectiveness of opioid therapy in chronic pain

Pain-induced changes in the brain’s opioid receptor system may explain the limited effectiveness of opioid therapy in chronic pain and may play a role in the depression that often accompanies it, according to a study from the NIH’s Intramural Research Program and McGill University....
Published: 27 May 2018

Clinical innovation takes centre stage at inaugural McGill CLIC and Hakim Family Prize event

Top finalists pitch to win 1st, 2nd and 3rd place prizes

By Diane Weidner, Steinberg Centre for Simulation and Interactive Learning

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Published: 25 May 2018

As harmful as dehydration?

We are all familiar with the drawbacks of dehydration, but we rarely hear about the harmful effects of overhydration. It is known that excess fluid accumulation can lead to dangerously low sodium levels in the blood or hyponatremia – a life-threatening condition that can result in brain swelling. Similarly, more is known about the mechanisms in the body that detect and drive thirst while little is known about how the brain detects a state of overhydration.

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Published: 22 May 2018

New approach to global-warming projections could make regional estimates more precise

A new method for projecting how the temperature will respond to human impacts supports the outlook for substantial global warming throughout this century – but also indicates that, in many regions, warming patterns are likely to vary significantly from those estimated by widely used computer models.

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Published: 15 May 2018

Climate change = a much greater diversity of species + a need to rethink conservation paradigms

A team of researchers believe that Quebec’s protected areas are poised to become biodiversity refuges of continental importance. They used ecological niche modeling to calculate potential changes in the presence of 529 species in about 1/3 of the protected areas in southern Quebec almost all of which were under 50 km2 in size....

Published: 15 May 2018

Beyond Killing Tuberculosis

Historically, our view of host defense against infection was that we must eliminate pathogens to eradicate disease. However, this perspective has recently been challenged as scientists have taken a lesson from plant biologists about an ancient strategy involving the ability to “tolerate” rather than “resist” infection to maintain health. This concept, referred to as “disease tolerance”, provides an opportunity to develop new strategies that mitigate the consequences of infection.

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Published: 11 May 2018

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