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Men have a lot to learn about their own fertility

The first large-scale study of its kind has revealed that Canadian men generally lack knowledge about the risk factors contributing to male infertility. Research led by Dr. Phyllis Zelkowitz, head of psychosocial research at the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, found that men could only identify about 50% of the potential risks and medical conditions that are detrimental to their sperm count and, thus, their prospects to father children.

Published: 22Nov2016

The Work of the Dead wins Cundill Prize in Historical Literature

The winner of the 2016 Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill was announced tonight at a gala awards dinner held in Toronto. Now in its ninth year, the Cundill Prize is one of the world’s most lucrative international awards for a nonfiction book. The Work of the Dead/ The Invention of Science/ The Invention of Nature took home the top prize of US$75,000.

Published: 18Nov2016

International Human Epigenome Consortium studies mark major step forward for epigenetics research

One of the great mysteries in biology is how the many different cell types that make up our bodies are derived from a single cell and from one DNA sequence, or genome. We have learned a lot from studying the human genome, but have only partially unveiled the processes underlying cell determination. The identity of each cell type is largely defined by an instructive layer of molecular annotations on top of the genome – the epigenome – which acts as a blueprint unique to each cell type and developmental stage.

Published: 17Nov2016

Keeping our balance - a tale of two systems

The transition from being sea creatures to living on land, even if it happened over 300 million years ago, seems to have left its traces on the way we keep our balance today.

“It’s a discovery that is likely to be controversial,” says Kathy Cullen, the senior researcher on a paper on the subject that was published recently in Nature Communications. She has been working on this problem for over a decade with her colleague Maurice Chacron who also teaches in McGill’s Department of Physiology.

Published: 11Nov2016

Measuring protection of the world’s rivers

To  what extent are the world’s rivers protected?  

In 2010, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), an international treaty for the conservation of biodiversity, set a 17% target for the protection of ‘inland waters,’ including rivers. But there was a problem: there was no good way to measure progress toward that target.  

Published: 10Nov2016

Innovation in Context

19Nov201608:30
to
17:00
Phi Centre 407 rue Saint Pierre, Espace A, Montreal, QC, H2Y 2M3, CA

The word "innovation" is everywhere. It refers to everything from technology to services to economic growth - but is innovation just about goods and services, or does it depend on who we are?

Towards better hip replacements

By Katherine Gombay
Some potentially good news for aging Baby Boomers: researchers believe that they have developed a hip replacement that will last longer and create fewer problems for the people who receive them than those currently in use. The secret? An implant that “tricks” the host bone into remaining alive by mimicking the varying porosity of real bones.

Interestingly, the key factor that distinguishes the new implant is that is LESS rather than more solid than those in current use, while still being just as strong.

Published: 2Nov2016

Murray Humphries named McGill Northern Research Chair

Institut nordique du Québec (INQ)’s founding partners have unveiled the first foundational elements of the Institute’s scientific program by simultaneously announcing three northern research chairs and introducing its newly recruited director of science and innovation, Louis Fortier. 

Representatives from INQ’s three founding universities made a joint announcement of funding for three research chairs supported by INQ, allocated to INRS, McGill University, and Université Laval—a historic first for northern research.

Published: 1Nov2016

Researchers identify gene associated with intracranial aneurysm in French-Canadian population

Scientists have identified a gene in the French-Canadian population that predisposes them to the development of intracranial aneurysm (IA), a potentially life threatening neurological condition that is responsible for approximately 500,000 deaths worldwide per year, half of which occur in people less than 50 years of age.

Using genetic analysis, the team of researchers found rare variations of one gene, RNF213, that appeared more frequently in IA patients than in the control group. Both patients and the control group came from French-Canadian families. 

Published: 31Oct2016

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