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Children in Quebec are not diagnosed early enough with type 1 diabetes

Elwyn was a healthy 13 month-old toddler when she started drinking water from the bathtub. Over time, she became increasingly thirsty and demanded more and more breast milk. For her parents, this seemed like typical behaviour related to a growth spurt. One day, however, they noticed that she was abnormally weak and rushed her to the emergency department.

Published: 14 May 2019

A Governor General’s Innovation Award for AI Pioneer Joelle Pineau 

By Meaghan Thurston 

Published: 13 May 2019

NSERC awards $3.7M to McGill-led research projects

On May 3, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) announced the recent recipients of the NSERC Strategic Partnership Grants program. Six McGill-led projects in the Faculty of Engineering and one in the Faculty of Medicine are receiving more than $3.7 million to conduct research in collaboration with a supporting organization.

Published: 3 May 2019

Astronomers Capture First Image of a Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

Published: 10 Apr 2019

Evolution, illustrated

What do you get when you put together several tons of steel plates, hundreds of mice, a few evolutionary and molecular biologists and a tiny Nebraska town near the South Dakota border?

Would you believe one of the most complete pictures ever of vertebrate evolution?

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Published: 1 Feb 2019

COMMENTARY: ‘CRISPR babies’: What does this mean for science and Canada?

In the wake of the announcement in China last November of the first ‘CRISPR babies’, Prof. Bartha Knoppers and researcher Erika Kleiderman from McGill’s Centre of Genomics and Policy (CGP) have published a commentary article in the Canadian Medical Association Journal on the use of CRISPR gene-editing techniques.

Published: 28 Jan 2019

Men and women remember pain differently

Scientists increasingly believe that one of the driving forces in chronic pain—the number one health problem in both prevalence and burden—appears to be the memory of earlier pain. Research published today in Current Biology suggests that there may be variations, based on sex, in the way that pain is remembered in both mice and humans.

Published: 10 Jan 2019

Nuclear pasta, the hardest known substance in the universe

A team of scientists has calculated the strength of the material deep inside the crust of neutron stars and found it to be the strongest known material in the universe.

Matthew Caplan, a postdoctoral research fellow at McGill University, and his colleagues from Indiana University and the California Institute of Technology, successfully ran the largest computer simulations ever conducted of neutron star crusts, becoming the first to describe how these break.

Published: 18 Sep 2018

Carbon reserves in Central American soils still affected by ancient Mayan deforestation

Deforestation is suspected to have contributed to the mysterious collapse of Mayan civilization more than 1,000 years ago. A new study shows that the forest-clearing also decimated carbon reservoirs in the tropical soils of the Yucatan peninsula region long after ancient cities were abandoned and the forests grew back.

Published: 20 Aug 2018

“Citizen Science” field observations yield updated predicted distributions for rare species

Online “citizen science” data initiatives may be able to help map the distribution of rare species in the wild, according to a study published August 8 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Yifu Wang of McGill University and colleagues. 

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Published: 8 Aug 2018

Chirality switching in biomineral structures

Researchers at McGill University have discovered a mechanism by which helical biomineral structures can be synthesized to spiral clockwise or counterclockwise using only either the left-handed or right-handed version of a single acidic amino acid.

Published: 1 Aug 2018

Billion-year-old lake deposit yields clues to Earth’s ancient biosphere

A sample of ancient oxygen, teased out of a 1.4 billion-year-old evaporative lake deposit in Ontario, provides fresh evidence of what the Earth’s atmosphere and biosphere were like during the interval leading up to the emergence of animal life. 

Published: 18 Jul 2018

Products derived from plants offer potential as dual-targeting agents for experimental cerebral malaria

Malaria, a life-threatening disease usually caused when parasites from the Plasmodium family enter the bloodstream of a person bitten by a parasite-carrying mosquito, is a severe health threat globally, with 200 to 300 million cases annually and 445,000 deaths in 2016.

Published: 20 Feb 2018

How viruses disarm the immune system

How do viruses that cause chronic infections, such as HIV or hepatitis C virus, manage to outsmart their hosts’ immune systems?

The answer to that question has long eluded scientists, but new research from McGill University has uncovered a molecular mechanism that may be a key piece of the puzzle. The discovery could provide new targets for treating a wide range of diseases.

Published: 5 Feb 2018

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