An ancient snake's cheekbone sheds light on evolution of modern snake skulls

News

100-million-year old legged snake fossil provides critical insight into how the heads of modern snakes evolved
Published: 20Nov2019

New research from a collaboration between Argentinian and University of Alberta and McGill University palaeontologists adds a new piece to the puzzle of snake evolution.

The researchers examined a strikingly well-preserved fossil of the rear-limbed snake Najash rionegrina, found in Argentina. The study shows that nearly 100 million years ago, these legged snakes still had a cheekbone—also known as a jugal bone—that has all but disappeared in their modern descendants.

“Our findings support the idea that the ancestors of modern snakes were big-bodied and big-mouthed— instead of small burrowing forms as previously thought,” explained Fernando Garberoglio, from the Fundación Azara at Universidad Maimónides, in Buenos Aires, Argentina and lead author on the study. “The study also reveals that early snakes retained their hindlimbs for an extended period of time before the origin of modern snakes which are for the most part, completely limbless.”

For decades, paleontologists' understanding of snake evolution was hampered by the limited fossil record. The new fossils presented in this study are crucial for reconstructing the early steps in the evolutionary history of modern snakes.


VIDEO: Snake skull fossil discovery


“This research revolutionizes our understanding of the jugal bone in snake and non-snake lizards,” said Michael Caldwell, professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at University of Alberta, and a co-author on the study. “After 160 years of getting it wrong, this paper corrects this very important feature based not on guesswork, but on empirical evidence.”

The nearly 100 million year old fossil snakes described in this study, found in Northern Patagonia, are closely related to an ancient lineage of snakes that populated the southern hemisphere continents of Gondwana, and appear to be related to only a small number of obscure, modern snakes. The researchers used micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanning to visualize the skull structures within the specimen, examining the pathways of nerves and blood vessels as well as the skeletal structure that would be otherwise impossible to see without damaging the fossil.

“This research is critical to understanding the evolution of the skulls of modern and ancient snakes,” added Caldwell. “The high level of imaging tools we used allowed us to peer deep into these early snake skulls and solve a lot of mysteries. Perhaps most exciting for me is the resulting evolutionary trees that suggest legged snakes were not just transitional forms, but persisted for nearly 100 million years!” stated Hans Larsson, Canada Research Chair in Vertebrate Palaeontology at McGill University.

The paper, “New Skulls and Skeletons of the Cretaceous Legged Snake Najash, and the Evolution of the Modern Snake Body Plan,” will be published in Science Advances (doi: 10.1126/sciadv.aax5833).

About McGill University

Founded in Montreal, Quebec, in 1821, McGill University is Canada’s top ranked medical doctoral university. McGill is consistently ranked as one of the top universities, both nationally and internationally. It is a world-renowned institution of higher learning with research activities spanning two campuses, 11 faculties, 13 professional schools, 300 programs of study and over 40,000 students, including more than 10,200 graduate students. McGill attracts students from over 150 countries around the world, its 12,800 international students making up 31% per cent of the student body. Over half of McGill students claim a first language other than English, including approximately 19% of our students who say French is their mother tongue.

Contact Information

Contact: 
Shirley Cardenas
Organization: 
McGill University
Email: 
shirley.cardenas [at] mcgill.ca
Office Phone: 
514-398-6751
Mobile Phone: 
514-594-6877