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Can you judge a man by his fingers?

Tue, 2015-02-24 17:07

Study finds link between relative lengths of index and ring fingers in men and behaviour towards women

By Melody Enguix

Maybe you should take a good look at your partner’s fingers before putting a ring on one. Men with short index fingers and long ring fingers are on average nicer towards women, and this unexpected phenomenon stems from the hormones these men have been exposed to in their mother’s womb, according to a new study by McGill researchers.

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New hope in the fight against pain

Thu, 2015-02-19 12:07

Study shows potential new therapy for neuropathic pain

By Cynthia Lee

An international study led by scientists at McGill reports, for the first time, that drugs that selectively target the melatonin MT2 receptor represent a novel class of analgesic drugs that could be used to treat patients with neuropathic pain.

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Smoking thins vital part of brain

Tue, 2015-02-10 12:07

By Anita Kar

Years ago, children were warned that smoking could stunt their growth, but now a major study by an international team including the Montreal Neurological Institute at McGill University and the University of Edinburgh shows new evidence that long-term smoking could cause thinning of the brain’s cortex. The cortex is the outer layer of the brain in which critical cognitive functions such as memory, language and perception take place. Interestingly, the findings also suggest that stopping smoking helps to restore at least part of the cortex’s thickness.

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Fumer amincit une partie vitale du cerveau

Tue, 2015-02-10 12:07

Par Anita Kar

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Invasive species pose serious threat to health of the Great Lakes

Tue, 2015-02-03 16:07

New study shows the vulnerability of the basin to future invaders – and calls for regulations to mitigate this threat

By Melody Enguix

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Blame it on your brain: Salt and hypertension

Sat, 2015-01-24 08:07

Study sheds new light on link between salt intake and blood pressure

An international research team led by scientists at McGill has found that excessive salt intake “reprograms” the brain, interfering with a natural safety mechanism that normally prevents the body’s arterial blood pressure from rising.

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The secret of empathy

Thu, 2015-01-22 08:07

The ability to express empathy – the capacity to share and feel another’s emotions – is limited by the stress of being around strangers, according to a new study published recently in the journal Current Biology.

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Music cuts across cultures

Tue, 2015-01-13 16:07

By Katherine Gombay

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Parasites and the evolution of primate culture

Thu, 2014-12-11 16:07

Study examines ‘costs’ of innovation, learning from others

By Chris Chipello

Learning from others and innovation have undoubtedly helped advance civilization. But these behaviours can carry costs as well as benefits. And a new study by an international team of evolutionary biologists sheds light on how one particular cost – increased exposure to parasites – may affect cultural evolution in non-human primates.

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