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A Brilliant Success

A Brilliant Night raises $1 million for brain cancer research

A Brilliant Night, raised an astounding $1 million for brain cancer research at its gala event on Oct. 19.

Published: 27Oct2016

It’s what's underneath that counts

To the naked eye, ancient rocks may look completely inhospitable, but in reality, they can sustain an entire ecosystem of microbial communities in their fracture waters isolated from sunlight for millions, if not billions, of years. New scientific findings discovered the essential energy source to sustain the life kilometres below Earth’s surface with implications for life not only on our planet but also on Mars. 

Published: 27Oct2016

The real- and growing- effects of fake pills

There is a placebo effect for both the patient who receives a placebo and the one who receives a real drug, according to Jeffrey Mogil, a professor in the department of psychology at McGill University.

Read more: CNN

Published: 27Oct2016

McGill tops Maclean’s ranking for 12th straight year

McGill once again ranked first in the “medical-doctoral” category in scholarships and bursaries for students, as well as in social sciences and humanities grants relative to faculty size. Maclean’s published the results online Wednesday evening.

“Our leading position in scholarships and bursaries in this ranking underscores our commitment to ensuring accessibility to education for all talented students, regardless of their financial means,” said Principal Suzanne Fortier.

Published: 26Oct2016

Unregulated 'internet of things' industry puts us all at risk

"Back in the 1970s, for much of the 1980s, and even into the 1990s, it was hard to foresee just how integrated this far-flung global infrastructure would become with every aspect of our lives and thus have deep security implications." Gabriella Coleman, the Wolfe chair in scientific and technological literacy at McGill.

Read more: CBC News

Published: 26Oct2016

International Criminal Court: South Africa's Withdrawal

"South Africa's main opposition party on Monday tried to block a government plan to withdraw from the International Criminal Court, saying the move is illegal and that the country's top court should intervene.

Published: 25Oct2016

How this Montreal grad student plans to finish school with zero debt

When Olivia White goes job hunting in a few years’ time after she graduates, she will be bringing a unique set of skills to the table. That’s because the 24 year old, who is pursuing an MA in urban planning at McGill University, has spent the last five years tree planting in northern B.C., a gruelling job that requires a lot of resilience.

Read more: The Globe and Mail

Published: 25Oct2016

Essential tremor sufferers needed for groundbreaking study

You probably know someone who has it. It is the most common movement disorder, yet most people don’t even know its name.

Essential tremor affects nearly one per cent of the world’s population, increasing to four per cent of those over 40. The involuntary shaking of hands is the most common symptom, but symptoms can also include shaking of the head and legs.

Published: 25Oct2016

Why some dental implants work and others don’t

Each year, about 500,000 North Americans get dental implants. If you are one of them, and are preparing to have an implant, it might be a good idea to start taking beta blockers, medication that controls high blood pressure, for a while. And to stop taking heartburn pills.

A body of research from McGill led-teams indicates that in order to raise the odds that dental implants will attach properly, there are clear benefits to taking certain common medications and avoiding others.

Bone cell growth, healing and death

Published: 25Oct2016

A key to unlocking the mystery of triple negative breast cancer

A study conducted at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) suggests screening breast cancer patients for the prolactin receptor could improve the prognosis for patients and may help them avoid unnecessary and invasive treatments. Using a database of 580 women with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), the researchers found that survival was prolonged in patients who expressed the prolactin receptor and that prolactin hormone was able to reduce the aggressive behavior of cancerous cells. It does so by decreasing their ability to divide and form new tumors.

Published: 25Oct2016

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