Pascale Tremblay: The neurobiology of speech perception in adulthood: From decline to plasticity

Event

Montreal Neurological Institute 3801 rue University, Montreal, QC, H3A 2B4, CA
Price: 
Free

Pascale Tremblay

Associate Professor
Université Laval, Québec, Canada

http://speechneurolab.ca/

Abstract: The ability to produce and perceive speech forms the building blocks of human communication. The complexity of the neural networks that support speech functions is increasingly recognized in the scientific community. Yet, despite the importance of speaking, communication and social interactions, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie age-related changes in speech perception and production and how they affect communication and well-being. In this talk, I will present recent work from my lab that explored the organisation of the neural speech systems, and the impact of aging on speech functions using behavioural and multimodal brain imaging and stimulation techniques. I will describe the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie these changes, focusing on neuroplasticity. I will also briefly touch on our recent work on singing as a modifier of normal aging. Understanding how the speech network evolve throughout the lifespan is a timely scientific challenge that holds implications for preventive medicine and rehabilitation.The ability to produce and perceive speech forms the building blocks of human communication. The complexity of the neural networks that support speech functions is increasingly recognized in the scientific community. Yet, despite the importance of speaking, communication and social interactions, little is known about the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie age-related changes in speech perception and production and how they affect communication and well-being. In this talk, I will present recent work from my lab that explored the organisation of the neural speech systems, and the impact of aging on speech functions using behavioural and multimodal brain imaging and stimulation techniques. I will describe the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie these changes, focusing on neuroplasticity. I will also briefly touch on our recent work on singing as a modifier of normal aging. Understanding how the speech network evolve throughout the lifespan is a timely scientific challenge that holds implications for preventive medicine and rehabilitation.

Bio: Pascale Tremblay is associate professor in Rehabilitation Sciences at Université Laval in Québec City, Canada, researcher at the CERVO Brain Research Center and holder of a Chercheur-boursier Junior 2 career award from the FRQS. Dr. Tremblay is co-director of the Quebec City brain imaging Center (CINQ), and co-founder of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL). Research in her lab, the Speech and hearing Neurosciences Laboratory (www.speechneurolab.ca), focuses on understanding the behavioural and neural substrates of speech/voice perception and production in adulthood and throughout aging and on strategies that can alleviate age-related changes to human communication such as musical activities though experience-induced brain plasticity. Her research combines high-end brain imaging, brain stimulation and behavioural methods.

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