CIRM welcomes three new members

News

Published: 5Jul2019

CIRM is pleased to announce the addition of three new members: Guillaume Éthier (UQAM), Övgü Ülgen (Université de Montréal) and Matthew Claudel (MIT)!

 

Guillaume Éthier


Guillaume Ethier is Professor of theories of the city and space-society relations in the Department of Urban and Tourism Studies at UQAM. He is interested in contemporary urban forms as reflections of society. In addition to two postdoctoral fellowships at the University of Edinburgh and McGill University, he has completed a doctoral dissertation awarded with Phyllis Lambert Prize (thesis of the year on the study of architecture in Canada) and Jean-Pierre-Collin Award (thesis of the year in urban studies of the network Villes Régions Monde). In recent years, he has published the book Architecture iconique : les leçons de Toronto (PUQ, 2015) and edited the collective work The Spectacle of Heritage (PUQ, 2017). For a number of years, he has been involved in placemaking in Montreal, notably with the organization La Pépinière Espaces collectifs, for which he has been leading since 2018 a vast project to study the impact of its actions. He is also interested in urban changes in the digital era, a topic discussed in a forthcoming essay, La ville analogique.

 

Övgü Ülgen


Graduated with a degree in Sociology from the Middle East Technical University in Ankara (Turkey) in 2011, Övgü Ülgen subsequently completed a Master 2 in Sociology at the School of Higher Studies in Social Sciences (EHESS) in Paris (France) in 2014. Her master thesis focused on ethnic studies, urban politics, collective memory and the political sociology of violence in the Middle East in a popular neighborhood called Tarlabasi in Istanbul, Turkey. Since September 2017, she is a PhD student at Université de Montréal under the supervision of Valérie Amiraux. Her current dissertation project focuses on the integration of an ethnic community residing in Montreal and Toronto with a generational perspective by analyzing the effects of two contrasting policies (the interculturalism of Quebec versus the multiculturalism of Canada) with the support of ethnography. Therefore, the main question for this study is as follows: What do the urban integration mechanisms of the Sephardic community in Toronto and Montreal reveal from the point of view of federal and provincial politics, but also from the point of view of the Sephardic community itself and their migration strategies?

 

Matthew Claudel


Matthew Claudel is a designer, researcher and writer. He co-founded MIT’s designX program, where he is the Head of Civic Innovation. Matthew has co-authored two books, Open Source Architecture and The City of Tomorrow as well as dozens of articles and chapters. Matthew is a fellow with the McConnell Foundation’s “Cities for People” initiative, and served on the jury for Canada’s national Smart City Challenge. He is a protagonist of Hans Ulrich Obrist’s 89plus global community of artists. In 2018, Matthew received a Public Policy Fellowship from the Rappaport Foundation to work with the Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics on strategies for enabling place-based innovation and experimenting with civic technology. He studied architecture at Yale, and received a Masters of Science in Urban Studies from MIT, where he is currently writing his doctoral dissertation on civic innovation systems.