Session Breakdown

session breakdown title

Listening to One Another to Grow Strong sessions require about 2.5 hours to deliver. Each session follows the same basic structure:

  • Greetings, group meal with opening prayer (at the group's discretion)
  • Refresher on the last session and ice-breaker game
  • Separate youth and caretaker activities
  • Concluding activities and take home assignments

PDF icon First Session from Manual

PDF icon First Session from Manual

The following table shows a session-by-session breakdown of the Anishinabe cultural adaptation of the program:

Session Contents Positive Mental Health Indicators/Protective Factors
Week 1:
Welcome Feast
Families meet each other and facilitators. There will be an introduction to the program, a feast to welcome participants, and a chance to learn more about the program and what it has to offer. Families view the drug and alcohol use “statistics video.” Social Acceptance; Mental Health Literacy
Week 2:
Anishinabe History
This session focuses on the history of the Anishinabe people. Participants also have the opportunity to practice some Ojibwe language. Environmental Mastery, Positive Affect, Self-Acceptance, Social Coherence, Social Growth, Social Integration
Week 3:
My Family
This week’s topic is family and community: How can we build on the strengths of the traditional family system from a contemporary view of family within Anishinabe culture? Personal Growth, Positive Affect, Positive Relations with Others, Self-Acceptance, Social Acceptance
Week 4:
A Good Way of Life
Participants will discuss testimonials from people who had alcohol and substance abuse problems, but were able to get back on track with the help of family and/or community. Family groups play “Minobimaadiziwin,” a board game developed for this program. Positive Affect, Positive Relation with Others, Self-Acceptance, Social Acceptance, Social Coherence, Social Integration
Week 5:
Help Seeking and Help Giving
No one is alone in facing problems. Participants will be encouraged to seek help in a good way, to offer tobacco in the proper manner, and to talk to the elders or spiritual leaders. Focus on telling someone (an elder, a parent, a teacher) if they or a friend is at risk for suicide. Environmental Mastery, Positive Relation with Others, Social Acceptance, Social Contribution, Social Growth
Week 6:
Stress & Anger Management
Participants learn new skills that can be used in dealing with anger and other forms of emotional distress. Focus on reducing impulsivity that increases risk for suicide. Environmental Mastery, Personal Growth, Positive Affect, Positive Relations with Others, Self-Acceptance; Ment­al Health Literacy
Week 7:
When I Feel Sad
Participants learn skills to cope with sadness and setbacks associated with suicidal ideation such as relationship break-ups, peer problems, and disappointments. Parents learn to recognize signs of depression and suicide risk. Self acceptance, environmental mastery, positive affect; Mental Health Literacy
Week 8:
Problem Solving
Participants will learn the “Taking STEPS” model for thinking about, dealing with, and solving problems. Autonomy, Environmental Mastery; Communication Skills
Week 9:
Historical Loss
Review of origins of and feelings associated with historical loss. Content to be developed in consultation with First Nations elders. Environmental Mastery, Social Coherence, Social Growth, Social Integration; Resiliency
Week 10:
Discrimination
Participants discuss experiences of discrimination they have had with others and strategies for dealing with such aggression. Environmental Mastery, Positive Affect, Self-Acceptance, Social Coherence, Social Growth, Social Integration
Week 11:
Peer Communication
Emphasis for youth is on choosing prosocial friends who do not use substances and how to deal with friends who do use. Also, what to do if they think a friend may be at risk for self-harm. Parents discuss the skills their children need for living, the importance of parent involvement in schools, spending quality time together, encouraging creativity, teaching compassion, and establishing ways to reward good behavior. Autonomy, Positive Relations with Others, Social Acceptance, Social Contribution, Social Growth; Resiliency
Week 12:
Refusal Skills & Monitoring
Direct skills training and role-plays for refusing alcohol and drugs in a culturally appropriate manner. Parents discuss issues surrounding discipline and traditional Anishinabe forms of discipline. Autonomy, Positive Relations with Others, Social Acceptance, Social Growth
Week 13:
Building Social Support
Discussion on where to go for support when needed. Develop a plan with youth, parents, and elders for how to recognize and protect suicidal youth. For youth, the emphasis is “Tell someone.” Parents and elders discuss how to intervene and protect suicidal youth through informal and formal community resources. Positive Affect, Positive Relations with Others, Social Acceptance, Social Coherence, Social Contribution, Social Growth, Social Integration
Week 14:
Building Social Support
Youth and parents discuss ways in which they can contribute to their community to make it a better place to live. Youth also complete a personal mission statement and assemble a scrap book reminding them of all the different things they learned during the program Positive Affect, Positive Relations with Others, Social Acceptance, Social Contribution, Social Growth, Social Integration
Week 15:
Celebration Feast
The end of the program is celebrated among the families. There are prizes, certificates, drawings, a feast, and a traditional blanket ceremony as a thank you and honoring of families for their participation. Autonomy, Life Satisfaction, Personal Growth, Positive Affect, Positive Relations with Others, Self-Acceptance, Social Acceptance, Social Integration