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McGill gets $91.5 Mln in CIHR funding

Researchers from McGill University and its hospital-affiliated research institutes have been awarded $91.5 million in grants in the latest round of funding by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

Published: 28Jul2015

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon?

As scientists continue to hunt for a material that will make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, new research from McGill University and Université de Montréal adds to evidence that black phosphorus could emerge as a strong candidate.

Published: 7Jul2015

Taking the pain out of office work

Office work will become much less of a pain in the neck if Julie Côté has her way. 

Published: 7Jul2015

His and her pain circuitry in the spinal cord

New research released today in Nature Neuroscience reveals for the first time that pain is processed in male and female mice using different cells. These findings have far-reaching implications for our basic understanding of pain, how we develop the next generation of medications for chronic pain—which is by far the most prevalent human health condition—and the way we execute basic biomedical research using mice.

Published: 29Jun2015

Examining dads’ influence on babies’ health

“Don’t diss dad” might mean more than making sure not to forget dad on Father’s Day, as researchers look at just how influential environmental exposures and genetic interactions are on dad’s sperm and, as a result, his offspring.

Published: 22Jun2015

Baby talk: babies prefer listening to their own kind

Everyone likes to look at young babies. But who wants to listen? Well…it turns out that other babies do.

Published: 12May2015

A better way to build DNA scaffolds

Imagine taking strands of DNA – the material in our cells that determines how we look and function – and using it to build tiny structures that can deliver drugs to targets within the body or take electronic miniaturization to a whole new level.

Published: 6May2015

New breast cancer gene identified

The study, which was published online today in Nature Genetics, describes how mutations in a gene called RECQL are strongly linked to the onset of breast cancer in two populations of Polish and French-Canadian women. This discovery could have future implications in preventing the development of breast cancer in some families. To read more

Published: 27Apr2015

Finding the body clock’s molecular reset button

An international team of scientists has discovered what amounts to a molecular reset button for our internal body clock. Their findings reveal a potential target to treat a range of disorders, from sleep disturbances to other behavioral, cognitive, and metabolic abnormalities, commonly associated with jet lag, shift work and exposure to light at night, as well as with neuropsychiatric conditions such as depression and autism. 

Published: 27Apr2015

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