choosing the right target

Burning Questions: Is Ottawa finally about to get serious about housing bubbles? | Regina Leader-Post

Published: 5Jan2022

December 24, 2021 | After Director Christopher Ragan published an essay in the Hub that perhaps Freeland and Macklem actually disagree about how the central bank should conduct policy rather than...

The key to Canadian economic prosperity that no one’s talking about | The Globe and Mail

Published: 12Aug2021

What is the future of monetary policy in Canada? Journalist Andrew Coyne breaks down options for the Bank of Canada's mandate renewal, highlighting the ideas presented at Choosing the Right Target:...

Going Beyond the Inflation-Targeting Mantra: A Dual Mandate

23 Apr 2021

Every five years over the last three decades, the Government of Canada goes through a ritual of renewing the mandate of its central bank. To most Canadians, this renewal process must be somewhat...

Time to Change the Bank of Canada’s Mandate

23 Apr 2021

In 2019, New Zealand created a formal monetary policy committee and enshrined the dual mandate (price stability and full employment) into their law and the policy targets agreement between the...

The History of Inflation Targeting and the Case for Maintaining the Status Quo

18 Feb 2021

Michelle Alexopolous argues that the evidence in favour of the various alternatives is not yet strong enough to justify the risks involved in abandoning the status quo.

Clouded in Uncertainty: Pursuing Financial Stability with Monetary Policy

9 Feb 2021

Sylvain Leduc of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on the merits of incorporating asset prices into the inflation targeting framework.

Nominal GDP Level Targeting

3 Feb 2021

Steve Ambler and Nicholas Rowe discuss the consequences of prioritizing the nominal GDP over the rate of inflation.

The Case for Raising the Bank of Canada’s Inflation Target

26 Jan 2021

Luba Petersen and Shannons Wells make the case for a higher rate of inflation, with Michael Devereux as a discussant.

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