Associate Dean (Academic)

Dr. Alice CherestesAlice Cherestes

Senior Faculty Lecturer, Bioresource Engineering

T: 514-398-7980  |  alice.cherestes [at] mcgill.ca (Email) |  Macdonald-Stewart Building, MS1-020

MANDATE:

The Associate Dean (Academic) oversees the courses and programs offered in the Faculty.

The Associate Dean (Academic) represents Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences on the University Academic Policy Committee, and chairs the Faculty Academic Program Committee. She serves on the Faculty Planning Committee, Faculty Promotions Committee, Farm Management and Technology Committee, and the Academic Committee of the Faculty of Science.

The Associate Dean (Academic) is a member of the Executive Committee, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

Information and forms related to the Associate Dean (Academic) portfolio can be selected from the list in the left-hand menu


About Alice Cherestes

Dr. Cherestes, who earned her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 1998, is keenly interested in understanding the role of metacognitive approaches in teaching and learning. Her doctoral work focused in synthesis, analysis and applications of ionic dendrimers. Various synthesized dendrimers were marketed as antibacterial agents. The aim of her postdoctoral fellowship at INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier was Taxol chemistry. The chemical reactivity of several positions on taxane skeletons was studied in order to provide more desirable derivatives that could possibly be used for the development of new breast cancer drugs and for increasing the efficacy of existing drugs such as selective estrogen receptor modulators. Also, the conformational and structural activity relationship of taxol and other related taxanes was analyzed, in order to better understand their microtubule binding ability and their solubility.

Dr. Cherestes, who teaches General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, has a passion for teaching and active learning and facilitates student success through continual program improvement to ensure learning outcomes are achieved and students’ academic and social needs are addressed.

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