McGill Alert / Alerte de McGill

Updated: Thu, 07/18/2024 - 18:12

Gradual reopening continues on downtown campus. See Campus Public Safety website for details.

La réouverture graduelle du campus du centre-ville se poursuit. Complément d'information : Direction de la protection et de la prévention.

Indigenous Tuition Initiative

Beadwork done by Shannon Cross

Background

McGill University is moving forward with one of its key reconciliation commitments outlined in the institution’s 52 Calls to Action. Specifically Call # 13 calls on the university to:   ​

“Implement a student funding model similar to the Haudenosaunee Promise at Syracuse University, which provides tuition and mandatory fee waivers for Indigenous learners from proximate territories.”   

Commencing in the Fall of the 2024/2025 academic year, McGill will be providing the equivalent of the cost of tuition and mandatory student fees to eligible students identified below. This initiative is an expression of McGill’s desire to engage in relationship-building, partnership and collaboration with Indigenous communities.   

The Objectives of the Tuition Initiative:   

  • Support Indigenous students’ educational choices  

  • Remove financial barriers to education for students  

  • Increase the number of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit graduates  

  • Support Indigenous community strategy through offsetting tuition costs   

  • To act upon McGill’s commitment to Truth and Reconciliation, outlined in McGill’s 52 Calls to Action.

  • Measure Indigenous student success to inform future policy decisions  

 
Advancement of this initiative is facilitated by McGill’s Office of Indigenous Initiatives in partnership with Student Accounts and the respective academic units with community partnerships engaged in this initiative. Our intention is to implement this initiative in stages. Later stages will work towards extending this initiative to other Indigenous students enrolled at McGill.  


Read More About the Initiative

Definitions

Applicant: a person who applies for the tuition initiative 

Awards: based on both academic merit and financial need 

Bursaries: based on financial need 

Scholarships: based on academic merit 

Indigenous Education Authorities: refers to the body within a specific Indigenous community which is responsible for post-secondary student support and funding (e.g. can be education centers, training institute, councils). Sometimes referred to as Indigenous ‘sponsor’.  

Full-time and Part-time: Full-time and part-time studies are defined by the educational institution and depends upon level of study. For this initiative, students must be mindful that Indigenous education authorities within the Category A communities may have different definitions of ‘full-time’ which students must adhere to in order to be eligible for living allowances.  

Category A- 5 identified communities: refers to Kahnawà:ke (QC), Kanesatake (QC), Akwesasne (Ontario & QC), St. Regis Mohawk Tribe (USA), and Six Nations of the Grand River (Ontario) 

Category B- Education partnerships: Refers to identified Indigenous communities who are currently in partnership agreements with the School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, and School of Social Work.  
 
Community endorsement: Documented support by the Indigenous education authority’s post-secondary officer and/or Director.  

Community-Based Sponsorship Lists: These are existing lists already delivered to Student Accounts which identify the student who is covered by band funding. The community presently receives an invoice for this student. 
 
McGill Funded Tuition Initiative List: This new list must be sent to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives. It identifies eligible students for the tuition initiative.  OII will consolidate the tuition initiative list from communities and forward this information to Student Accounts. Communities will not receive an invoice for these students. 

‘For-credit’ Courses: A course that contributes to the fulfillment of the requirements for a degree or diploma program. Successful completing a for-credit course earns a student academic credits, which are counted towards the total credit requirement for graduation. These courses are identified with a course number and have formal evaluation processes. 

Non-credit courses: A course that does not count towards a degree or a diploma, or that does not result in academic credit. These courses are often designed for personal or professional development outside of academia, rather than fulfilling the requirements of a formal academic program. For more information, visit the School of Continuing Studies.  

Special Students: Special Students are students enrolled in for-credit courses without seeking a diploma from McGill University, at either the undergraduate or graduate level. They may be professionals, recent graduates, or those seeking advanced qualifications for future professional or educational achievement. These students must meet certain academic requirements and are often subject to similar academic admissions policies as degree-taking students.  

Visiting Students: Visiting Students are enrolled in a degree program at another post-secondary institution and are taking courses at McGill University to transfer credits back to their home institution. These students must obtain permission from their home institution and meet McGill’s admission standards. Examples of “Visiting Students” include exchange students or students enrolled in collaborative academic arrangements between post-secondary institutions.  

Status: A person who is registered as an Indian on the Registrar of the Federal Government’s Indian Register. 

Indigenous: A person who is recognized as “one of the aboriginal peoples of Canada” within the meaning of section 35 the Constitution Act, 1982, which further states that for the purposes of the Constitution, the “aboriginal peoples of Canada includes the Indian, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada”. This policy (consistent with general Canadian practices) understands the term “Indians” in the Constitution to now be replaced by the term “First Nations”. 

Non-Status: A person who identifies as an Indian or First Nations and is not registered on the Government of Canada’s Indian Register but who: 1) is a direct descendant of a parent or grandparent who is/was a Registered Indian on the Government of Canada’s Indian Register and holds/held a valid Status Card; 2) is on a Band membership list where the Band has control of its membership list; or 3) is on the enrolment, citizenship, registry or membership list of an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement. 

First Nations: A person who self-identifies as an Indian or as First Nations, whether Status or Non-Status. Applicants are required to provide proof of First Nation identity by providing a valid Certificate of Indian Status (a “Status Card”) or a citizenship, membership, registration or enrolment card issued by: 1) the Registrar of the Federal Government’s Indian Register; 2) a Band within the meaning of the Indian Act that has control of its membership list; or 3) by an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement. 

Inuit: A person who self-identifies as Inuit. Applicants are required to provide proof of Inuit identity by providing a valid Inuit identity card issued by:by 1) an Inuit organization that is recognized by the Government of Canada, 2) an Inuit organization that is recognized by the Government of Nunavut; or 3) an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement. 

Métis: A person who self-identifies as Métis. Applicants are required to provide proof of Métis identity by providing a valid Métis citizenship, membership, registration or enrolment card issued by: 1) one of the Métis Settlements in Alberta, 2) a provincial organization that is a member of the Métis National Council, which includes the Métis Nation British Columbia, the Métis Nation of Alberta, the Métis Nation Saskatchewan, the Manitoba Métis Federation and the Métis Nation of Ontario; 3) an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement; or 4) a Métis organization that is recognized by the Government of Canada.  

Tuition and Enrolment Certificate (T2202): is a tuition tax receipt issued to all students for tuition related to the calendar year. It shows the amount of tuition and fees that can be deducted for income tax purposes as well as the number of months eligible for the education deduction, if applicable, for full-time studies. 

T4A: A Statement of Pension, Retirement, Annuity, and Other Income (T4A) is provided by the University to students who have received awards, including scholarships and bursaries.

McGill "Tuition Initiative List": This new list must be sent to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives. It identifies eligible students for the tuition initiative. The Office of Indigenous Initiatives will consolidate the ‘"Tuition Initiative List" from communities and forward this information to Student Accounts. Communities will not receive an invoice for these students. Communities can give their tuition initiative list directly to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives or through the liaison in School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, or Social Work who will provide it to OII.

Program Eligibility

Eligible Programs: 

  • Includes full-time and part-time students, enrolled in degree and ‘for-credit’ courses, with certain program approval required (see below) 

Ineligible Programs 

  • Currently, non-credit courses are not eligible for this initiative as part of Phase 1. 

  • Special approval is required for certain programs and circumstances, outlined below 

What is covered?  

  • Tuition charges and mandatory student fees for credit courses 

  • Mandatory DFE (departmental) and AFE (academic) fees up to $200.00 (example of such fees are the nursing clinical skills kit) 

  • Mandatory field trips, up to $300 

What is not covered?  

  • Tuition and fees for non-credit courses 

  • (Opt-outable) health and dental fees  

  • Housing/rent or transportation costs 

  • Living allowances and textbooks  

  • uPrint charges (for printing). First Peoples’ House offers free printing to Indigenous students 

  • Meal Plans 

  • Fees for optional field trips 

  • OneCard charges (food and dining service) 

  • Fines, interest charges, and late registration fees 

  • Based on McGill Senate Regulations, International students (St. Regis Mohawk Tribe) will still need to purchase health insurance through International Students Services through Blue Cross.  

  • Any other fees that are non-mandatory opt-outable 
     

Special Approval Required for the Following Programs: 

These specialized programs have a self‐funded rate of tuition. If you are a student considering any of the following programs, approval must be obtained by the Office of Indigenous Initiatives before you register, by emailing Indigenoustuition [at] mcgill.ca (subject: Program%20Inquiry-%20Tuition%20Initiative)

  • Master of Public Policy (Faculty of Arts) 

  • McGill HEC Montreal Executive MBA 

  • MBA/Law Program 

  • Master of Management and Analytics 

  • Master in Management in Finance 

  • Master of Management in Retailing 

  • Master of Business Administration 

  • International Masters for Health Leadership 

  • International Master Program for Managers  

  • Masters of Global Manufacturing and Supply Chain Management  

  • Graduate Certificate in Healthcare Management  

  • Graduate Certificate in Professional Accounting 

  • Joint Executive MBA 

  • Any other existing or future self-funded program (except for those offered through partnerships listed in Category B) 

  • Any non-credit activity within the School of Continuing Studies, the Executive Institute, or other McGill Faculties 

Special Approval Required for the Following Circumstances: 

  • Eligible students who are registered as Special or Visiting and are taking a credit course, are eligible with the endorsement of their Indigenous community education authority 

Eligible Indigenous Students

Category A 
Indigenous Students who are community citizens/members of the following local/proximate Haudenosaunee communities regardless of whether they are on-campus or in-community learners: 

  • Kahnawà:ke (QC) 

  • Kanesatake (QC) 

  • Akwesasne (Ontario & QC) 

  • St. Regis Mohawk Tribe (USA) 

  • Six Nations of the Grand River (Ontario) 

Notes on Category A

 

  • Indigenous students who are not enrolled on their community’s registry, but who are federally recognized as members of the eligible communities must apply through the Office of Indigenous Initiatives using the application form. Eligibility criteria from Indspire will be applied. Students not able to access funding for living allowances and books through their community must continue to apply for those through the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) student support program.  

  • This initiative does not include First Nations, Métis and Inuit students who are not enrolled citizens/members of the identified communities but may be living within one of these identified communities in Category A.

Category B 
Students who are First Nations, Metis, or Inuit students and are taking courses delivered through the following formalized educational partnership with School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, and School of Social Work: 

  • Cree Nation of Mistissini (QC) 

  • Cree Nation of Eastmain (QC) 

  • Cree Nation Government (QC) 

  • Cree Nation of Chisasibi (QC) 

  • Cree Eeyou Resource and Research Institute (QC) 

  • Ouje-Bougoumou Cree Nation (QC) 

  • Makivvik (QC) 

  • Nunavik Regional Board of Health and Social Services (QC) 

  • Kativik Ilisarniliriniq (QC) 

  • Cree School Board (QC) 

  • Naskapi Education Committee (QC) 

  • Listuguj Education Directorate (QC) 

  • Micmacs of Gesgapegiag (QC) 

  • Mamu Tshishkutamashutau Innu Education (NL) 

  • Nunavik (QC) 

  • Kanehsatà:ke Mohawk Language Custodian Association*  

  • Kahnawake Education Center* 

*We acknowledge two partnerships exist (Kahnawake Education Center and Mohawk Language Custodian Association of Kanehsatà:ke) which are listed in Category B, but by their citizenship/community affiliation are also eligible under Category A. 

Notes on Category B 

  • Indigenous students in these partnerships are eligible for this initiative up to the completion of their degree, certificate, or diploma offered as part of the partnership. Partnerships are renewable.  

  • The tuition initiative does not apply to every citizen/member of the Indigenous community identified in Category B, only those taking courses through the partnership agreement with SCS, OFNIE, or SW. 

  • Education authorities are at liberty to include non-Indigenous students in their program partnership, but this initiative will not cover tuition and fees for those non-Indigenous individuals. It will be up to the community to decide if McGill is billing the non-indigenous student directly, or if they would be added to a community-funded sponsorship contract. 

Application Process and Details

Step 1: Where to Apply

Category A: Students from one of the five identified communities in Category A will apply through their community’s education authority using the organization’s existing documentation, as they regularly do when they apply for post-secondary funding. Students are strongly encouraged to continue to apply for living allowances and books, as this initiative excludes those expenses. The education authority will confirm the student meets their existing membership/citizenship eligibility criteria for funding.  

Category B: From the list of identified partners with the School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, and School of Social Work, the respective education authorities/partners must confirm the eligibility of their students for this initiative, ensuring that they are First Nations, Metis, or Inuit members and are part of their partnership program. The community will provide McGill with a list of students eligible for the initiative automatically. The student does not need to apply directly to McGill for the initiative. 

 

Step 2: Receiving and Processing Eligible Students

Category A: For Kahnawà:ke, Kanesatake, Akwesasne, St. Regis Mohawk Tribe, and Six Nations, once citizenship/membership validation occurs, the "Tuition Initiative List" from each community will be sent by the education authority to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives at indigenoustuition [at] mcgill.ca. We have provided an appendix for the Category A "Tuition Initiative List" template.   
 

Category B: For OFNIE, SCS, SW partnership communities, they will be asked to provide their "Tuition Initiative List" to their respective administrative liaison in OFNIE, SCS, and SW or directly to the Office of Indigenous initiatives at indigenoustuition [at] mcgill.ca. We have provided an appendix B for the Category B "Tuition Initiative List" template.

 

Step 3: Confirmation

McGill will report back to education authorities that the student has been processed. Transcripts are not included in the reporting. The obligation of students in reporting their grades will remain a matter of education authority policy. 

OII will also provide students who applied to OII directly with confirmation that they have met eligibility for the tuition initiative and the coverage has been processed.  

 
Deadlines 

The regular deadlines for education authorities to send McGill the Community-funded sponsorship list and the McGill-funded "Tuition Initiative List" are:  

  • For Fall: July 24 
  • For Winter: November 24 
  • For Summer: March 24 

 
If the student in Category A is not on their community’s band list and is therefore applying through the Office of Indigenous Initiatives, they must fill out the application form by:  

  • For Fall- July 7th  
  • For Winter- November 7th  
  • For Summer- March 7th  

Assessment is based on documented affiliation with a community in Category A.  

 

Financial Implications for Students

This initiative will be technically considered an award not based on merit nor financial need, which means it will be taxable and a T4A will be issued to the student. Students are advised to consult with a tax expert on their particular circumstances and inform their education authority if they cannot participate in this initiative.  
 

 

 

 

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

How do eligible students apply for the tuition initiative?  

Category A: Students from one of the five identified communities in Category A will apply through their community’s education authority using the organization’s existing documentation, as they regularly do when they apply for post-secondary funding. Students are strongly encouraged to continue to apply for living allowances and books, as this initiative excludes those expenses. The education authority will confirm the student meets their existing membership/citizenship eligibility criteria for funding. The community will provide McGill with a list of students eligible for the initiative automatically. The student does not need to apply directly to McGill.  

Indigenous students who are not enrolled on their community’s registry, but who are federally recognized as members of the eligible communities must apply through the Office of Indigenous Initiatives using the application form. Eligibility criteria from Indspire will be applied. Students not able to access funding for living allowances and books through their community must continue to apply for those through the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) student support program.  
 
Category B: From the list of identified educational partnerships with the School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, and School of Social Work, the respective education authorities/partners must confirm the eligibility of their students for this initiative: that they are First Nations, Metis, or Inuit members and are part of their partnership program. The list of eligible students will be given to McGill.

Why is McGill using Indspire’s criteria to determine eligibility of Indigenous persons for the tuition initiative?

McGill does not currently have a student-focused Indigenous citizenship/membership policy in place (this work is in progress) but did not wish to delay this important financial initiative aimed at supporting Indigenous students. For this reason, McGill is adopting a partnership model, working with Indigenous communities and groups identified in Category A and Category B to identify eligibility.  
 
Until a student-focused Indigenous citizenship/membership policy is in place at McGill, the Office of Indigenous Initiatives will apply Indspire’s criteria to determining eligibility for Category A communities, which the institution already uses to determine eligibility for the McGill Okòn:ra Undergraduate Award.  

Indspire’s eligibility criteria for Indigenous persons includes: Inuit Beneficiary, Métis Nation, Non-Status First Nation, Status First Nation. 

Status: means a person who is registered as an Indian on the Registrar of the Federal Government’s Indian Register. 
 
Indigenous: means a person who is recognized as “one of the aboriginal peoples of Canada” within the meaning of section 35 the Constitution Act, 1982, which further states that for the purposes of the Constitution, the “aboriginal peoples of Canada includes the Indian, Inuit, and Métis peoples of Canada”. This policy (consistent with general Canadian practices) understands the term “Indians” in the Constitution to now be replaced by the term “First Nations”. 

Non-Status: means a person who identifies as an Indian or First Nations and is not registered on the Government of Canada’s Indian Register but who: 1) is a direct descendant of a parent or grandparent who is/was a Registered Indian on the Government of Canada’s Indian Register and holds/held a valid Status Card; 2) is on a Band membership list where the Band has control of its membership list; or 3) is on the enrolment, citizenship, registry or membership list of an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement. 

First Nations: means a person who self-identifies as an Indian or as First Nations, whether Status or Non-Status. Applicants are required to provide proof of First Nation identity by providing a valid Certificate of Indian Status (a “Status Card”) or a citizenship, membership, registration or enrolment card issued by: 1) the Registrar of the Federal Government’s Indian Register; 2) a Band within the meaning of the Indian Act that has control of its membership list; or 3) by an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement. 

Inuit: means a person who self-identifies as Inuit. Applicants are required to provide proof of Inuit identity by providing a valid Inuit identity card issued by: 1) an Inuit organization that is recognized by the Government of Canada, 2) an Inuit organization that is recognized by the Government of Nunavut; or 3) an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement. 

Métis: means a person who self-identifies as Métis. Applicants are required to provide proof of Métis identity by providing a valid Métis citizenship, membership, registration or enrolment card issued by: 1) one of the Métis Settlements in Alberta, 2) a provincial organization that is a member of the Métis National Council, which includes the Métis Nation British Columbia, the Métis Nation of Alberta, the Métis Nation Saskatchewan, the Manitoba Métis Federation and the Métis Nation of Ontario; 3) an Indigenous group under a modern land claims agreement; or 4) a Métis organization that is recognized by the Government of Canada.

What is the process for validating student eligibility?

Category A. Community education centers will review an applicant’s eligibility based on the community’s internal citizenship/membership eligibility for post-secondary funding. Once reviewed and approved, education authorities will send the "Tuition Initiative List" to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives at McGill. The Office of Indigenous Initiatives will work with Student Accounts to process the "Tuition Initiative List".  
 
Indigenous students who are not enrolled on their community’s registry, but who are federally recognized as members of the eligible communities must apply through the Office of Indigenous Initiatives using the application form. 

Category B. Student eligibility, based on these guidelines and the community criteria, is verified by the partnership community/group. The student must be a First Nations, Metis, Inuit person and taking courses through a partnership program.“Tuition Initiative Lists”will be provided to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives directly or through the liaison in School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, or Social Work.  

I am a member of one of the Category B communities, but am not in a program offered through a partnership with the School of Continuing Studies (SCS), Office of First Nations and Inuit Education (OFNIE) or School of Social Work (SW). Am I eligible for the tuition initiative?

No. At this time, Phase 1 of this initiative does not include all citizens of the Nation/community initiating the partnership. It only includes members who are taking course offerings through partnerships with School of Continuing Studies, Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, or Social Work.

Will my application for this coverage impact my ability to receive other McGill scholarships, fellowships, aid, or awards?

No, this application is independent of students being considered for other McGill financial aid and awards (whether based on academic merit or financial need). For more information about the other funding opportunities dedicated to Indigenous students: https://www.mcgill.ca/studentaid/special-funding/indigenous-student-funding)

Will I be eligible for the McGill Okòn:ra Undergraduate Award, and other opportunities, if I receive the tuition and fee initiative?

Yes. This initiative does not take away other opportunities for scholarships, bursaries, awards, or incentives offered through the Scholarships and Student Aid Office.

The Okòn:ra $5,000 Award is allocated annually to every Indigenous student in any undergraduate degree program, including on-campus Bachelors, Law (BCL&JD), Medicine (MDCM), and Dentistry (DMD), with a complete application and confirmed Indigenous affiliation. Students must carry a full-time course load, unless approved by the McGill.

Will my application for this waiver impact my ability to receive other McGill scholarships, fellowships, aid or awards?

No, this application is independent of students being considered for other McGill financial aid and awards (whether based on academic merit or financial need). For more information about the other funding opportunities dedicated to Indigenous students: https://www.mcgill.ca/studentaid/special-funding/indigenous-student-funding.

Will I be taxed if I receive benefits from this initiative?

Students who benefit from this initiative will receive a T4A and a RL1 slip for the amount of the payment to their fee account. Students are advised to consult with a tax specialist about the tax implications of the payment. We are not able to give tax advice to individuals. If you are unable to benefit from this due to your tax circumstances, inform your education authority. 

What happens if my student account shows an outstanding balance, but I’m supposed to be eligible for the tuition initiative?

Review your Account Summary by Term in Minerva. Look down the right-hand ‘Balance’ column to see on which charges the balance is resting. If you have a balance on charges that should be covered by the tuition initiative reach out to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives. The OII office will review your eligibility and ask Student Accounts to add you to the “tuition Initiative List” if appropriate. 

If the balance is resting on charges not covered by the “Tuition Initiative List” then you (the student) are responsible for clearing your balance by the due date on your most recent e-bill. You can find the accepted payment methods on the Student Accounts website

I have a hold on my account and cannot register for classes because my account shows an outstanding balance, but I'm supposed to be exempt. What should I do?

Look at your Advising Transcript in Minerva. If you have anything other than an ‘AR’ hold (Fees owing >= $100), look at the Help text to find out the reason for the hold, and how to clear it.  

If you have an ‘AR’ hold, review your Account Summary by Term in Minerva. Look down the right-hand ‘Balance’ column to see on which charges the balance is resting. If you have a balance on charges that should be covered by the “Tuition Initiative List” reach out to the OII office. The OII office will review your eligibility and ask Student Accounts to add you to the “Tuition Initiative List” if appropriate. If this clears your balance the hold will lift. 

If the balance is resting on charges not covered by the “Tuition Initiative List” then you (the student) are responsible for clearing your balance by the due date on your most recent e-bill. You can find the accepted payment methods on the Student Accounts website. Once the payment is received, the hold on your account will lift. 

If you are unsure about what is covered or not covered under the ‘Tuition Initiative List” please refer to the first and second questions in this FAQ list. 

What if a student fails a course, or multiple courses? Will they have to pay back the tuition?

Students are responsible for remaining in satisfactory academic standing (CGPA of 2.00 or greater). McGill has a number of resources to support students, including subsidized tutoring through First Peoples’ House and academic advising within their faculty. If a student fails a course or two, they will not be required to pay back the tuition and fees.

What if a student falls into academic difficulty?

If there are extenuating circumstances which cause a student to fall into academic difficulty or they are no longer attending class, students are encouraged to consult with their education body or sponsor. In addition to that, students must comply with department and faculty requirements to remain in good standing.  

Education centers within the student’s community provide academic counselling and have their own performance criteria which students must adhere to. Students are encouraged to work with their education body to develop a plan that will ensure their academic success, and/or determine when it is necessary, for whatever reason, to pause their studies.

Will students need to give the Office of Indigenous Initiatives their transcripts?

Students are responsible for reporting their grades to the relevant educational authority in their community, as per education authority funding policies. The Office of Indigenous Initiatives will not ask students for copies of their transcripts. McGill will only confirm with the education authority that the student has been covered by the tuition initiative.

How long will McGill cover my tuition and fees?

Students in Category A are covered until the completion of their course/program/degree. Students are permitted to re-apply for subsequent degrees.  

Students in programs delivered through specified partnership agreements through the Office of First Nations and Inuit Education, School of Continuing Studies, and School of Social Work (Category B) are eligible for this initiative up to the completion of the degree, certificate, or diploma offered as part of the partnership. Partnership agreements are renewable.

If a student eligible through Category A completes a course/certificate/degree under this initiative, can they apply again?

Yes. A student in Category A will be eligible for this initiative following the completion of their course, certificate/diploma, degree, or program; however, they will be required to apply again. 

What documents will be needed if I am applying directly to the Office of Indigenous Initiatives because I’m from one of the five identified communities but not on my band’s list?

The application form on the OII website and one of the following:  

  • A copy of an Indian status card 

  • A certified copy of an enrolment card or written confirmation of membership/enrollment from a US or Canadian federally recognized band/tribal authority. 

  • Other documents to support the criteria for eligibility will be accepted and reviewed on a case-by-case basis. All documentation provided will be reviewed by the Office of Indigenous Initiatives.  

Will I lose coverage through this initiative if I drop one of my courses?

The tuition initiative will cover the total tuition cost for an approved program of study. The tuition initiative coverage will be applied to your student account after the last day to add or drop a course for the term.  

 

Back to top