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McBurney Latin America Fellowship

Quick Facts | Fellowship Description | Current Fellows

What is the focus of the fellowship?

The McBurney Fellowship's mandate is to make a significant contribution to improving the health and social conditions of poor and marginalized populations in Latin America through the delivery of concrete and measurable interventions or service-based projects.

Who is it for?

  • Advanced undergraduate (60+ credits completed) or graduate students at McGill who are motivated to develop a self-directed internship project or service oriented research.  

What do students do?

  • Develop an internship or service project in collaboration with a McGill faculty member
  • Attend orientation and pre-departure sessions at McGill
  • Travel to Latin America, typically for 2-3 months to complete their project
  • Report back to the IHSP

Where and when does it take place?

  • Orientation and training take place at McGill. Fellowships can take place anywhere in Latin America (including Mexico and the Caribbean) at any point in the year. However, applications are only reviewed in April.

How much is the award?

  • Typically $3500-$4500 depending on the length of the fellowship.

How many awards are available?

  • Approximately 15 fellowships are available each year

Description

The McBurney Fellowship Award provides support to students who plan to travel to Latin America in order to participate in a program or project that improves the health status and/or social conditions of marginalized populations in Latin America.

Through the generous support of the McBurney Fellowship, 64 McGill students have traveled to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Panama, Peru, and Colombia to work with marginalized populations in Latin America over the past five years.


Information on the McBurney Professional Training Program can be found under Research


2016 McBurney Fellows

Andreane Bellon de Chassy (Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences): Travelling to Colombia as part of a food security team to investigate ideal markets and regions for the sale and use of nutritious, disease-resistant potatoes.

Benjamin Demers (Faculty of Arts, Geography): Travelling to Ecuador to help map Tapiabamba village, a marginalized community being affected by a state-run mega-project.

Brendan Timmins (Nursing). Travelling to Haiti to collaborate on the advancement of nursing research in the area of postoperative care.

Deboleena Mazumdar (Faculty of Arts and Science, Cognitive Science). Travelling to Ecuador to help map Tapiabamba village, a marginalized community being affected by a state-run mega-project.

Elena Bouton (Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Environment). Travelling to Ecuador to help map Tapiabamba village, a marginalized community being affected by a state-run mega-project.

Fanny Boudet (Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Global Food Security). Travelling to Peru as part of a team helping to preserve and protect local medicinal knowledge in the Amazon, bridging Western and traditional practices.

Hannah Reardon (Faculty of Arts, Anthropology and Political Science). Travelling to Brazil to volunteer with and document the role of foreigners in local NGOs, as a way of understanding development dynamics in marginalized communities.

Jean-Yves Taranger (Faculty of Education). Travelling to Mexico to participate in the development of a community cultural museum as part of the development of educational programs. 

Joan Hermann (Faculty of Arts, School of Environment). Travelling to Panama to participate with a team investigating degraded landscaped in the Panama Canal watershed, analyze causes and implement solutions.

Marc Malloy (Faculty of Arts, International Development). Travelling to Bolivia to address sustainable solutions to food insecurity in urban areas. 

Marie-Lou Despoux (Faculty of Science, Environment). Travelling to Guatemala to investigate methods of increasing local knowledge documentation and sharing among farming communities to increase agricultural resiliency and food security.

Max Malloy (Faculty of Arts, International Development). Travelling to Bolivia to address sustainable solutions to food insecurity in urban areas. 

Rebecca Park (Arts & Science, Environment). Travelling to Peru as part of a team helping to preserve and protect local medicinal knowledge in the Amazon, bridging Western and traditional practices.

Sally Maxwell (Faculty of Science, School of Environment). Travelling to Peru as part of a team helping to preserve and protect local medicinal knowledge in the Amazon, bridging Western and traditional practices.

Sophie Kronk (Faculty of Arts, International Development). Travelling to Bolivia to address sustainable solutions to food insecurity in urban areas.