Past Events

April 13, 2021 - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

Remapping the Social Determinants of Health & Wellbeing: Childhood Neurodisability, Ecosocial Theory, and the Future of SDOH

Speakers:

Dr. Lucyna Lach, Associate Professor, Social Work; member of the Centre for Research on Children and Families & Institute for Health and Social Policy , McGill University.

Dr. Angela Marques Filipe, CIHR Fellow, Wenner-Gren Writing Fellow; affiliate member of the Division of Transcultural Psychiatry, McGill University.

Description:

While much has been already said about the social determinants of health (SDoH) framework, little is known about its challenges and potentials in the context of childhood neurodisability, where questions of wellbeing, neurodiversity, and social justice take centre stage. The webinar explores these questions in light of current debates and of an ecosocial, research-action oriented framework that is relevant to families, practitioners, advocates, and decision-makers, both in times of COVID-19 and beyond.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon apr_13_webinar_final.pdf

Couldn't make it to the Symposium, WATCH IT HERE!


2021 EVENTS

The artist and the pandemic event promo imageMonday April 12th 3-4pm EST

Prof Daniel Weinstock hosts:

The Artist and the Pandemic

A Katherine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy WEBINAR

Description:

Artistic expression has an irreducibly public dimension. Although technology allows us to experience art by ourselves, there is something about the communal dimension of experiencing art together that simply cannot be replaced either by producing art for private enjoyment, or by coming into contact with artistic expression by ourselves. Reacting to art as a member of a collective, and performing before a live audience, just are a different set of phenomena from what is involved in private experience.

The COVID-19 pandemic overnight almost eradicated the habitual public vehicles in which the communal experience of art occurs. Museums and galleries have been deprived of their audiences for over a year now. Even public spaces that are often the sight of mass transit and congregation have been empty. How does such an absence of public and civil engagement in spaces devoted to art impact artistic creation?

This webinar brings together three world-renowned artists to reflect upon the challenges that the year just past has presented. What has its impact been on their creative process? What has their experience of these alternative "modes of delivery" been? Have there been any unexpected benefits or opportunities in the adaptation to a new reality? And what does the future hold for the art world? Will we be returning to "normal", and if now, what relatively permanent changes do they foresee in the ways in which they continue to create?

Speakers:

Jenny Holzer
Lili Kobielski
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer


April 6, 2021 - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

Disability Rights in Policy Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic

Speakers:

Dr. Ciara Siobhan Brennan, COVID-19 Disability Rights Monitor & Centre for Disability Studies, University of Iceland

Dr. Keiko Shikako-Thomas, Canada Research Chair in Childhood Disability, McGill SPOT

Dr. Sébastien Jodoin, Canada Research Chair in Human Rights, Health, and the Environment, McGill Faculty of Law

Dr. Derek L. Cogburn, American University & Executive Director, Institute on Disability and Public Policy

Moderator: Dr. Raphael Lencucha, McGill SPOT

Description:

Drawing on a systematic analysis of COVID-19 policies as well as surveys of people with disabilities, this webinar will address whether and how governments around the world have adopted COVID-19 control and recovery policies that recognize and protect the rights of persons with disabilities.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon apr_6_webinar_final.pdf

Couldn't make it to the Symposium, WATCH IT HERE!


Promotional Flyer for eventThe Centre de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la diversité et la démocratie (cridaq) is hosting an event

March 25-26, 2021 

Colloque L’administration publique des diversités

The socio-cultural transformations of Quebec society have been constantly questioning the conditions of living together in a plural Quebec, and this in a more systematic way for the last fifteen years. Most of the most recent public debates on secularism, national identity or citizenship have often arisen from "micro-events". If they have their source in everyday life, in simple punctual interactions, in ordinary situations of leisure or work, these events have rapidly become factors of tension and disagreement in the public sphere.

Organized through Zoom on March 25 and 26, 2021, the main objective of the conference is to bring together researchers and practitioners whose research and/or professional activities focus on the role of public action in the (re)definition of diversity issues in public administration in Quebec, while being attentive to Canadian perspectives on these realities.

This event is offered in French.

For more information, visit their website at https://cridaq.uqam.ca/colloque-administration-publique-des-diversites/

View the full-sized poster here PDF icon Colloque L’administration publique des diversités


March 23, 2021 - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

Homelessness Prevention: Framework, Examples and Evidence

Speakers:

James Hughes
President and CEO, Mission Brewery

Hannah Brais
Research Coordinator, Mission Brewery

Eric Latimer
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University

Description:

The number of people experiencing homelessness is continuing to rise in most countries. Why is this happening, and what can be done to prevent it? Drawing from Gaetz and Dej’s framework for homelessness prevention, speakers will discuss real-world applications from international examples, illustrating what can be done in Québec. Questions for future research will be outlined, and evidence-informed policy directions put forward.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon mar_23_webinar_final.pdf

Couldn't make it to the Symposium, WATCH IT HERE! 


March 9, 2021 - 12:30-13:30 EDT

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

Supporting Science and Policy Integration through Data Science and Artificial Intelligence

Speaker:

Vik Pant, PhD

Chief Scientist and Chief Science Advisor, Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)
Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of Toronto and Founder, Synthetic Intelligence Forum (SIF)

Description:

Across Canada, NRCan scientists and researchers are creatively applying innovative digital solutions to support sustainable development and the competitiveness of Canada’s natural resource sector. This talk will showcase the acceleration of Digital Innovation using Data Science and AI to support policy design and implementation.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon mar_9_webinar_final.pdf

Couldn't make it to the Symposium, WATCH IT HERE!


Seminar Promotional PosterThe IHSP is co-hosting the following Biomedical Ethics Unit online event:

February 25th, 2021
13:00-14:30 EDT

The Psychedelic Resurgence in Psychiatry:
Ethics, Epistemology, and Enthusiasm

This symposium will explore growing enthusiasms related to the use of psychedelics in psychiatric contexts and beyond. Three talks on this topic will be released for viewing: 1) an examination of the rich history of psychedelic research in Canada by Erika Dyck 2) an overview of current research and policy discussions by Mark Haden 3) and an anthropological exploration of the psychedelic framework of set and setting by Tehseen Noorani. We will be hosting a virtual and live panel discussion including the three speakers which will explore in greater depth the ethical and epistemological questions that arise as psychedelic science is increasingly taken up in medicine.

The event is hosted by the Biomedical Ethics Unit and co-sponsored by the Med Class of '70, the Institute for Health and Social Policy, the Culture, Mind & Brain Program, the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, and the Department of Social Studies of Medicine.

View the full-sized poster here: PDF icon The Psychedelic Resurgence in Psychiatry


February 23, 2021 - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

Double Tragedy: Global GBV in Same-Sex Relationships

Speaker:

Emmy Igonya
Medical Anthropologist (sexuality, sexual and gender diversity, sex work, drug use, HIV, infant and young child feeding)
Post-Doctoral Research Scientist, APHRC

Description:

This talk will focus on gender-based violence (GBV) in same-sex relations in Kenya and globally. It will discuss how the criminalization and stigmatization of same-sex make GBV in same-sex relations a double tragedy that is seldom talked about.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon feb_23_webinar_final.pdf

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!


Event Promotional FlyerFebruary 2, 2021 - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

The role of policy in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis: a conversation with Professors Sandro Galea and Martin McKee

Speakers:

Sandro Galea
Robert A. Knox Professor and Dean
Boston University School of Public Health

Martin McKee
Professor
European Public Health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Description:

Moderated by IHSP Associate Member Erin Strumpf, this session features a conversation with two eminent population health scholars, Sandro Galea and Martin McKee, on the relation between evidence and policy in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and economic crisis. Potential topics include: how public policy responses have evolved during the pandemic; how evidence has informed policy prescriptions (or not); what we’ve learned about policy effectiveness; and how we should prioritize population health research moving forward.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon webinar_promo_final020221.pdf

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!


Disability, Justice and Care Symposium promotional flyerJanuary 29, 2021 - 12:30-14:30

Disability, Justice and Care Symposium

Speakers:

Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry
Assistant Professor
Faculty of Law & IHSP, McGill University
“Disability and the Social Contract Tradition"

Eva Feder Kittay
Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Emerita
Stony Brook University/SUNY
“Getting to Justice from an Ethic of Care”

Jennifer Nedelsky
Professor
Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
“Part time for All: Restructuring Work and Care”

Description:

The panel of speakers will consider how traditional understandings of justice have not sufficiently accommodated care needs for all citizens. They will examine three main themes: (1) how mainstream social and political expectations have disenfranchised some people with severe disabilities; (2) how conceptions of justice that fail to include an ethic of care will fail to include everyone who ought to be included, and (3) how we could change the current structure of work to meet the care needs of society.

The speakers propose that integrating an ethic of care within our theories, policies and social practices will improve the moral life of our society. The pandemic is one of many events exposing that more needs to be done to renew and reach ideals of inclusion and fairness.

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon Disability, Justice and Care Symposium

Couldn't make it to the Symposium, WATCH IT HERE! 


Event Promotional FlyerFriday, January 22nd, 12:30 p.m. EST (UTC—5:00)

The Philosophy & Political Theory of Harm Reduction: Special Issue Launch

To be followed at 1:30 by a brief meeting of the Canadian Harm Reduction Theory Network (CHaRT Network).

Featuring:

N. Crofts (Melbourne)
S. Dea (Regina)
A. Gruenewald (Waterloo)
S. Hoffman (Saskatchewan)
A. Klein (McGill)
J. Jones (Waterloo)
N. King (McGill)
T. Kirschenheiter (Wayne State)
M. Narvaez-Chicaiza (McGill)
L. Porter (Bristol)
A. Viens (York)
D. Weinstock (McGill)

Click here to view the full-sized poster: PDF icon hcalaunchposter.pdf


January 12, 2021 - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Policy Talks Webinar

A War on Science? Rethinking Vaccine Hesitancy and Refusal

Speaker:

Maya Goldenberg
Associate Professor, Philosophy
College of Arts, University of Guelph

Description:

Because vaccine hesitancy is widely seen as an information problem, vaccine outreach has focused on educating the misguided publics about vaccine science and debunking myths. Yet research into science and the publics lends strong support to the view that public attitudes regarding scientific claims turn crucially on epistemic trust rather than understanding science. It follows that it is poor trust in the expert sources that engender vaccine hesitancy, and that vaccine communications should focus on building that trust rather than trying to correct the publics’ epistemic and moral failings.

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!

Click here to view the flyer in full-size: PDF icon jan_12_webinar_final.pdf

2020 EVENTS

DECEMBER 15th - 12:30-13:30

Home-sick

Annmarie Adams
Chair, Department of Social Studies of Medicine
Stevenson Professor, Peter Guo-hua Fu School of Architecture
Associate Member, IHSP

This talk explores the changing role of “place” during the global pandemic, especially the new, competing roles of the home as refuge and workplace. How have changing notions of contagion shaped houses and cities? And what might we expect as architecture of the future?

View the poster here PDF icon webinar_promofinal12152020.pdf


CHRLP Forum promotional posterDECEMBER 3rd - 1pm ET

CHRLP Forum: a Reading Group on Power, Mobilization, and Change

Dec 3rd theme: Broadening the Horizons of Disability Justice

Facilitated by Professor Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry

All welcome!

Readings and talks:

For more information, please contact katrina.bland [at] mail.mcgill.ca.

Click here to view the poster PDF icon dec_3_chrlp_forum_poster.pdf


UN COSP13 Side Event Promotional FlyerDecember 3rd, 2020 from 6:00 - 7:15 p.m. ET

UN COSP13 Side Event

Promoting inclusive environments for the full implementation of the CRPD for children with disabilities

Side event at the 13 United Nations Conference of the States Parties for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

The side event will focus on the monitoring of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) and Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). A dynamic panel of youth with disabilities, government officials, researchers, civil society leaders and family members will discuss the policy, academic and practical issues needed to promote the creation of domestic monitoring frameworks that will favour the realization of an inclusive sustainable development that includes children with disabilities and their social environments.

Panelists:

Keiko Shikako-Thomas, PhD, Canada Research Chair in Childhood Disability, CHILD-BRIGHT Network/McGill University

Lisa Wolff, Director of Policy and Research, UNICEF Canada

Tabatha Tranquilla, Director, Canadian Human Rights Commission

Steven Estey, Canadian Council for Rehabilitation and Work

Kathy Vandergrift, Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children

Rubab Arim, PhD, Senior Research Analyst - Social Analysis and Modelling Division, Statistics Canada

Leanne Findlay, Principal Analyst, Health Analysis Division, Statistics Canada

Rebekah Kintzinger, Parent

Jonathan Lai, PhD, Director of Strategy and Operations, Canadian Autism Spectrum Disorder Alliance

Emily Gruenwoldt, President and CEO, Children's Healthcare Canada

Jennifer Zwicker, PhD, Canada Research Chair in Childhood Disability Policy, Scientific Deputy, Kids Brain Health Network/University of Calgary

Rachel Martens, Stakeholder Engagement Strategist, CanChild/Kids Brain Health Network

Ahnaf, Emma, Jacob, Youth Advocates

Click here to view the poster PDF icon un_cosp13_side_event_flyer_nov2020-2.pdf


December 1st promotional flyerDECEMBER 1st - 12:30-13:30

Citizen Engagement in Artificial Intelligence Ethics: Enabling People's Input in Population Health Policy-Making

Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon, PhD
Visiting Researcher, The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics, Harvard Law School

Description

It has quickly become a truism that the ethics of artificial intelligence (AI) is necessary and must help guide technological developments. This talk will review the state of citizen and stakeholder engagement in AI ethics and propose a way to enable and capture citizen perspectives to inform policy-making in population health.

View the poster here - PDF icon webinar_promo_final1212020.pdf

If you missed the Webinar, you can WATCH IT HERE!


November 25th - 14:00-15:00 EST

The National Collaborating Centre for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP) is hosting an event:

Webinar - Wellbeing Budgeting and Public Health: Promising Practice for Pandemic Recovery?

 

This webinar will offer an introduction to wellbeing and wellbeing budgeting with a particular focus on public health and the promises they may hold for a pandemic recovery.

Speakers:

Christopher Barrington-Leigh
Associate Professor, Institute for Health and Social Policy, School of Environment, McGill University

Lindsay McLaren
Professor, Department of Community Health Sciences and the O'Brien Institute for Public Health, University of Calgary and Research Associate at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

Facilitator

Val Morrison
Scientific Advisor, NCCHPP

Description

The health, social, and economic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic have left governments at all levels thinking about the way forward. In the midst of uncertainty, many, including many in Canada, have called for a health and economic recovery that puts people and their wellbeing at the heart of the efforts. Before the appearance of SARS-CoV-2 in late 2019, many organizations and governments had already begun looking for ways to move beyond Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as a measure of how well countries are doing to finding ways of measuring how well people in countries are doing. New Zealand, for example, adopted a wellbeing budget last year.

Our two guest speakers, Christopher Barrington-Leigh of McGill University and Lindsay McClaren of the University of Calgary, will present material and answer questions that will allow participants to understand what is meant by a wellbeing (or quality of life, or life satisfaction) approach to guiding budgets and policies. We will particularly look at the connections between existing public health perspectives and the wellbeing approach and point to ways that wellbeing, and wellbeing budgeting in particular, may offer a promising path as we move forward into and beyond the Covid-19 pandemic.

After attending this webinar, participants should be able to answer the following questions:

    1) What is wellbeing budgeting?
    2) How does a wellbeing approach fit with public health practice?
    3) What does a wellbeing approach offer in a post-COVID-19 Canada?


November 20th, 2020 - 10:30-12:00 EDT

A Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Event in celebration of National Child Day

PHACtually Speaking Seminar
Health Inequalities and our Canadian Youth: who is vulnerable and how can we close the gaps?

The IHSP's Frank Elgar will be speaking

Description:

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought the importance and impact of long-standing health inequalities to the forefront.

Through panel presentations, using health inequalities findings from the national and international Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey and the Pan-Canadian Health Inequalities Reporting Initiative, this seminar will present the state of the science and provide opportunity for discussion on key principles for action and promising practices that can be adapted to advance health equity of youth within the Canadian context.

For more information about National Child Day, please visit Canada.ca.


November 17th event promo flyerNOVEMBER 17th - 12:30-13:30

IHSP Disability Working Group Presents:

Moral Accommodations: Tolerating workplace misconduct due to a disability

Adi Goldiner, PhD
King's College London

The right of disabled people to reasonable accommodations/adjustments in the workplace is a common feature of disability antidiscrimination legislation. This talk focuses on what Adi Goldiner calls workplace 'moral accommodations', namely the right that employers tolerate employees’ otherwise unacceptable behaviour when it is due to some underlying impairment. The need for this type of accommodations arises often (but not only) when people with mental disorders experience difficulties in regulating emotional responses or reading social cues in work situations. As a result of their impairments, employees might engage in workplace misconduct—be it angry outbursts, inappropriate emails, or threats to co-workers—which provides a just cause for termination. Instead of dismissal, moral accommodations mandate tolerating their misconduct, through allowing job transfers, granting 'second chances', or providing exemptions from certain workplace conduct rules.

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE! 

View the poster here PDF icon november_17th_webinar_promo.pdf


CIRM November 13th Promo ImageNovember 13th, 2020
13:30-15:00

CIRM Event - A Century of Health Crises in Montreal

Can we benefit from past epidemics to better understand and experience the current pandemic? What are the similarities between yesterday's health crises and today's?

The health crisis we are facing stresses the crucial importance of history in the understanding of contemporary phenomena. This second meeting of the series Rethinking the City in Times of Pandemic will be an opportunity to recount the major epidemics that Montreal has experienced over the past century: typhus, Spanish flu, and polio. For the occasion, Magda Fahrni and Daniel Weinstock welcome three former students who, through their respective research work, have analyzed these various health crises and their impact on Montreal society. This discussion between the guests will allow us to better understand different present and past realities such as the role of immigration in the spread of a disease, the cleavage between different social classes as well as the education of children in times of health crisis.

Moderators:

Daniel Weinstock - Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy in the Faculties of Law and of Arts, McGill U.

Magda Fahrni - Professor, Department of History, UQAM

Guests:

Sophie Doucet - Postdoctoral Researcher, Concordia University

Maude Charest-Auger – Archivist, Quebec Ministry of Public Security

Valérie Poirier – Postdoctoral Researcher, Guelph University


NOVEMBER 10th - 12:30-13:30

Comparing Social Policy Responses to COVID-19 in Canada and the United States

Daniel Beland
James McGill Professor of Political Science, McGill University and Director of MISC

Shannon Dinan
Assistant Professor of Politics and International Studies, Bishop's University

Alex Waddan
Associate Professor of American Politics and American Foreign Policy, University of Leicester

As the COVID-19 crisis unfolded, the Canadian and US governments both enacted temporary measures to mitigate the unprecedented consequences of the global pandemic, but the United States’ tepid public-health response has created a stark divide between the two countries. A close look reveals some startling differences in how social policy was used to ensure health and economic security. This event will explore how both countries responded to the COVID-19 crisis, and what growing social policy divide means for the future.

View the poster here PDF icon nov._10th_webinar_promo.pdf

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!


NOVEMBER 3rd - 12:30-13:30

The Impact of COVID on Immigrant and Racialized Communities in Montreal

 Jill Hanley
 Associate Professor, McGill School of Social Work and Scientific Director of the SHERPA University Institute on Migration, Health and Social Services

Janet Cleveland
Researcher on the rights and well-being of asylum seekers and non-status migrants, SHERPA University Institute on Migration, Health and Social Services

The talk presents the findings of a study on the impacts of the COVID crisis on vulnerable groups within Montreal's immigrant and racialized communities. In April-May 2020, interviews were conducted with 50 key informants from community groups providing services to newcomers and ethnocultural associations in Montreal. Findings suggest that the COVID crisis disproportionately affects racialized groups with certain characteristics, including low SES, precarious migratory status, non-English or French speaking, or employment in the health sector or certain other ‘essential’ sectors.

View the poster here PDF icon november_3rd_webinar_promo.pdf

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!


Event PromotionOctober 22nd, 2020
6:00-7:00 EDT

Zonta Club of Ottawa, Canada presents: Dr. Alissa Koski on "Child Marriage in Canada" 

Click here to for more information!


October 20th, 2020
12:30-13:30

The Girl in the Pandemic

Moderator: Claudia Mitchell, Distinguished James McGill Professor, Director of the Institute for Development and Well-Being (IHDW)

Relebohile Moletsane
Professor and John Langalibalele Dube Chair in Rural Education, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Eleni Nash
Gender Officer, Agricultural Transformation Through Stronger Vocational Education, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Hannah Pugh
Project Coordinator, Agricultural Transformation Through Stronger Vocational Education, Dalhousie University

Jennifer Thompson
Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Public Health CReSP, University of Montréal

Katherine L. Frohlich
Professor, Ecole de Santé Publique et CReSP, Université de Montréal

Marianne Dupré-Deslandes
Student, UQAM

Some have referred to the current Covid-19 crisis as a “tale of two pandemics” in reference to both the obvious health issues and the pervasive gender inequalities that have become exacerbated. All around the world, girls and young women are facing increasing levels of precariousness. In this talk, our speakers from Quebec, South Africa and Ethiopia, will highlight how the question becomes one of how to address these new contexts. They will also speak to how critical it is that we learn with and from girls and young women in a time of distancing, and when our efforts could do more harm than good.

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!

View the poster here PDF iconoctober_20th_webinar_promo.pdf


IHSP Policy Talks October 6 Promotional flyerOctober 6th, 2020
12:30-13:30

Cities and Psychosis

Ian Gold
Professor of Philosophy and Psychiatry, McGill University

Daniel Weinstock
Katharine A. Pearson Chair in Civil Society and Public Policy, McGill University

Although we have known for more than 80 years that one is at greater risk of developing a psychotic illness like schizophrenia in a city, the reasons for this remain obscure. In this webinar, we will review the data on cities and psychosis and explore some of the explanations for the phenomenon. 

View the poster here PDF icon october_6th_webinar_promo.pdf

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!


September 22nd, 2020
12:30-13:30

Insights into Sars-CoV-2 Transmission and Control

Justin Lessler, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health

This talk will cover insights into SARS-CoV-2 transmission and control gleaned from the analysis of data collected as part of the public health response in locations ranging from China, to Switzerland, to the United States. It will examine the insights into disease transmission we have inferred from our research, as well as what we know about what works for control.

Talk co-hosted by the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health.

If you missed the webinar, the event was recorded and a link will be available soon.


ISQOLS Webinar Flyer for Chris Barrington-Leigh's talkIf you missed Wellbeing, sustainability, and progress: what's needed to help governments be accountable to human experience with Chris Barrington-Leigh, you can view it HERE!


IHSP Webinar Series Promotional Header

June 30th, 2020 - 12:00-13:00

“COVID-19 and the Perils of “Warehousing” People with Disabilities”Promotional Flyer for June 30th event

This talk will discuss three key perils of the continuing (care) institutionalization of people with disabilities in Canada. Speakers will discuss the impact of the “warehousing" of disabled people on COVID spread and deaths in Québec and Ontario, and its disproportionate affects on women, immigrants and people of colour. They will also share their perspectives on the perils of prevalent discriminatory triage policies, and the impact of facilities prohibiting personal support workers and family members on the provision of needed personal care, nutrition, communication, information and mental health supports.

Speakers:

Amy E. HasbrouckAMY E. HASBROUCK has been a disability rights activist for more nearly 40 years. Ms. Hasbrouck’s activism combines her personal experience with congenital and acquired disability with a cross-oppression analysis gained through involvement in the women’s rights, anti-war, LGBT, and other social justice movements. She worked in architectural access and the independent living movement before graduating from Northeastern University School of Law in 1997. Her subsequent legal work concentrated on health and mental health law and implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Ms. Hasbrouck has focused her writing and research skills on abuse of children and adults with disabilities, producing a groundbreaking report on prosecution and sentencing of parents who kill their disabled children in 1997. This study led to her involvement with the disability rights-based opposition to assisted suicide, euthanasia, and other end-of-life practices that discriminate against people with disabilities. Ms. Hasbrouck has served on the board of Not Dead Yet in the U.S. since 2000, and she is the founder (in 2013) and Executive Director of Toujours Vivant-Not Dead Yet a project of the Council of Canadians with Disabilities to expand the reach of CCD’s ending of life ethics committee. She also serves as the chair of the Board of Directors of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, and has had several articles and op-eds published in newspapers in Canada and elsewhere. She lives in southwestern Québec.

Heidi JanzHEIDI JANZ, PhD, specializes in the field of Disability Ethics, and has been affiliated with the John Dossetor Health Ethics Centre since 2006. Heidi is currently an Assistant Adjunct Professor with the John Dossetor Health Ethics Centre. She was employed as the Curriculum Coordinator for an emerging Certificate Program in Disability Ethics in the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Alberta. In her “other life,” Heidi is a writer and playwright. In 2004, she self-published Sparrows on Wheels, a novel for young adults. Her list of produced plays includes: Crips Against the Law of Gravity, produced in the 1994 Edmonton Fringe Theatre Festival, Returned to Sender, produced by Concrete Theatre in 1997 and by Lone Sparrow Productions for the Edmonton Fringe in the summer of 2001, and Voices at Dying, Dying to be Heard, produced in 2006 for the 16th International Congress on the Care of the Terminally Ill, Montreal, Quebec. Her latest play,The Book of Jobes, was produced by Lone Sparrow Productions and Kompany Family Theatre for the 2011 Edmonton Fringe Theatre Festival. An expanded, two-act version of The Book of Jobes is scheduled for production in Edmonton and Calgary in February of 2013.

Jonathan MarchandJONATHAN MARCHAND est Président de Coop ASSIST. Il est un stratège confiant, un planificateur renseigné et déterminé qui a travaillé longtemps dans les technologies de l’information au Québec et en Australie en tant qu’ingénieur réseau sénior. Il est l’instigateur du projet pour un nouveau programme d’Assistance Personnelle Autodirigé. Il croit profondément que toutes les personnes en situation de handicap du Québec doivent avoir le soutien nécessaire pour vivre en société, incluant celles qui ont besoin d’un soutien important, sans compromettre leurs droits humains. Son expérience de vie m’a appris qu’il existe des obstacles énormes à l’inclusion sociale et culturelle des personnes handicapées au Québec et il s’est engagé à éliminer ces barrières pour permettre à celle-ci de participer et contribuer à la société sur un pied d’égalité.

Please click on this link to view the full-sized Promotional Flyer!

Couldn't make it to the webinar, WATCH IT HERE!


June 23rd, 2020 - 12:00-13:00 

“Weaponizing Uncertainty in the COVID-19 Pandemic”Promotional Flyer for June 23rd event

Description: The COVID-19 pandemic has required political leaders, health care professionals, and citizens to make life-or-death decisions under conditions of rapidly-changing knowledge and extreme uncertainty. At the same time, individuals and political groups have 'weaponized' uncertainty for personal and political gain, amplifying extant political fractures and distrust of political and scientific authorities. How has weaponized uncertainty influenced our collective response to COVID-19, and what lessons can we learn for the future?

Speaker:

Nicholas KingNICHOLAS B. KING is an associate professor in the Biomedical Ethics Unit and associate member in the Institute for Health and Social Policy, and the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Occupational Health at McGill University. He directs the Policy and Data Science program and is a board member of the Center for Social and Cultural Data Sciences at McGill. Dr. King studies the ways that 'black boxes' of all sorts - from seemingly objective measures of health and health inequalities, to complex algorithms - are shaped by human interests and hidden value judgments, which in turn shape individual decisions, collective behaviors, and public policies. He has published in the Milbank Quarterly, Annals of Internal Medicine, BMJ, PLOS Medicine, the American Journal of Public Health, and the Bulletin of the World Health Organization.

Please click on this link to view the full-sized PROMOTIONAL FLYER! 

Couldn't make it to the webinar? WATCH IT HERE!


Promotional flyer for June 22 event with image of Daniel WeinstockLe Club Universitaire de Montréal vous présente

Lundi le 22 juin à 17h30 sur Zoom

Daniel Weinstock, professeur à la Faculté de droit de McGill et directeur de l’Institut des politiques sociales et de santé de McGill, traitera de la question de la restriction des droits individuels pendant la pandémie, tout en regardant vers l’avenir et les processus par lesquels nous les retrouverons.

 

 


June 16th, 2020
12:00-13:00

“State Power and Accountability in Pandemic Times”

Promotional Flyer for June 16 eventDescription: In this webcast our speakers will discuss some of the main questions they are studying as part of their “Law in Pandemic Times: Powers and Accountability when Facing Emergency” project. Acting quickly in response to immediate needs, government authorities are currently testing the limits of their broad and discretionary powers in a way that challenges our democratic ideals, reinforcing the need for transparency, oversight and accountability. Our speakers will use this crucial period in our history to evaluate our public authorities’ powers and accountability mechanisms in relation to emergency public health decision-making. This work is one of the critical research programs being supported by the McGill Interdisciplinary Initiative in Infection and Immunity (MI4) with seed funding from the MUHC Foundation.

Speakers:

M-E CoutureMARIE-EVE COUTURE MÉNARD holds a DCL (2014) from the Faculty of Law of McGill University. She is an Associate Professor at Faculty of Law of Université de Sherbrooke and is affiliated with the Centre de recherche sur la régulation et le droit de la gouvernance (CrRDG).

Lara KhouryLARA KHOURY holds the title Advocatus emeritus from the Barreau du Québec, is an Associate Professor at the McGill Faculty of Law and the co-convener of the McGill Research Group on Health and Law. She is also an Associate Member of the Institute for Health and Social Policy and of Biomedical Ethics Unit.

Alana KleinALANA KLEIN is an Associate Professor at the McGill Faculty of Law and the other co-convener of the McGill Research Group on Health and Law. She is an Associate Member of the Institute for Health and Social Policy and was formerly a senior policy analyst with the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network.

Couldn't make it to the webinar? WATCH IT HERE!

Please click on this link to view the full-sized PROMOTIONAL FLYER!


IHSP Webinar Series Promotional Flyer

June 4th, 2020
12:00-13:00

LEARNING FROM COVID: BUILDING RESILIENT COMMUNITIES IN PANDEMIC TIMES

"Accessibility and allocation of public parks and gardens during COVID-19 social distancing: a case study from England and Wales"

Speakers:
Jill BaumgartnerJILL BAUMGARTNER
Institute for Health and Social Policy & McGill Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health

Jill Baumgartner is an Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar in the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics & Occupational Health at McGill University. She also is an Associate Member of the McGill School of Environment. Dr. Baumgartner studies exposure to environmental pollutants and their affect on human health in the context of urbanization and development. She holds a joint Ph.D. in Population Health Sciences and Environment & Resources from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Masters in Population and International Health from Harvard University. She was a Global Renewable Energy Leadership Fellow at the Institute on the Environment (University of Minnesota) from 2011-2013 and a visiting researcher at Tsinghua University in 2012.

NILOOFAR SHOARINILOOFAR SHOARI
Research Associate, Imperial College London

Niloofar is a Research Associate in the School of Public Health at Imperial College London. Her research is at the intersection of environmental sciences and public health with a focus on understanding the links between exposure to urban environmental factors, including green space, air and noise pollution, inequalities, and health. She completed her PhD in Environmental Engineering at École de technologie supérieure (Canada), where she worked on quantitative analysis of soil contamination data and developed guidelines for engineers and policy-makers as to how to deal with the below detection limit concentrations. She was a visiting research scholar in the Department of Statistics at the University of Waterloo and Texas A&M University. She completed her MSc and BSc in Environmental Engineering at La Sapienza University of Rome (Italy).

Description:
Visiting parks and gardens may attenuate the adverse physical and mental health impacts of social distancing implemented to reduce the spread of COVID-19. This webinar will present new research on access to public parks and gardens in urban areas of England and Wales, and the potential for park crowdedness during periods of high use – and discuss the implications of these findings to Quebec.

Couldn't make it to the webinar? WATCH IT HERE!

Please click on the link to view the full-size PROMOTIONAL FLYER!


Webinaire RRSPQ - Pandémie(s) et libertés fondamentales

2 juin 2020 - 12h00-13h00

Résumé

L’état d’urgence sanitaire est un régime juridique d’exception qui n’a jamais été appliqué auparavant dans la province. Depuis le 13 mars dernier, les Québécois sont donc soumis à une « expérience juridique » extrême, alors que l’État bénéficie de pouvoirs extraordinaires pour protéger la collectivité contre la menace posée par la Covid-19. Plusieurs droits et libertés individuels s’en trouvent brimés, dont la liberté de mouvement et la vie privée dans certains cas. Cette présentation a pour but d’éclairer trois volets de ce régime juridique, pour attirer l’attention sur des éléments qui devraient faire l’objet de questionnements, du moins post-crise : (1) les critères légaux qui permettent de déclencher une déclaration d’état d’urgence sanitaire; (2) les éléments légaux qui tracent les limites des pouvoirs d’urgence et leur pertinence eu égard au déconfinement éventuel; (3) les mécanismes de reddition de comptes prévus à la loi, dans une perspective démocratique.

Vous pouvez consulter l'article paru dans La Presse le 19 avril 2020 où les conférenciers Marie-Eve Couture Ménard et Daniel Weinstock sont intervenus : Le virus liberticide

Conférenciers

Marie-Eve Couture Ménard, Ph.D.
Professeure agrégée, Faculté de droit, Université de Sherbrooke

Marie-Eve Couture Ménard est professeure agrégée à la Faculté de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke et avocate. Elle enseigne dans les domaines du droit de la santé publique, du droit agroalimentaire et de l’éthique en recherche. Ses travaux de recherche portent surtout sur la gouvernance collaborative en santé publique et les politiques publiques favorables à la santé, notamment en milieu municipal. Elle est chercheuse au sein du Centre de recherche sur la régulation et le droit de la gouvernance (CRDG) de la Faculté de droit de l’Université de Sherbrooke.

Daniel Weinstock, Ph.D.
Responsable Axe Éthique, RRSPQ
Directeur, Institut des politiques sociales et de la santé, Université McGill
Professeur, Faculté de droit, Université McGill

Diplômé de McGill et Oxford, il a été l'étudiant de Charles Taylor, et a suivi des cours avec John Rawls à Harvard. De 2002 à 2011, il a été directeur fondateur du Centre de recherche en éthique de l'Université de Montréal. En 2012, il est devenu professeur à la Faculté de droit et au Département de philosophie de l'Université McGill. En 2013, il a été nommé directeur de l'Institut des politiques sociales et de la santé. Depuis 2015, il est responsable de l'axe Éthique du RRSPQ.


Webinaire RRSPQ - Enjeux éthiques des certificats d'immunité

19 mai 2020 - 12h00-13h00

Résumé

Les propositions récentes d’utiliser des « passeports d’immunité » pour ceux et celles qui ont des anticorps les protégeant de la COVID-19 soulèvent des problèmes éthiques complexes. Bien que les avantages de telles mesures semblent clairs du point de vue de la santé publique, celles-ci pourraient ouvrir la porte à des pratiques discriminatoires dont la société devrait se méfier.

Lors de ce webinaire, les conférenciers examineront ces préoccupations et les moyens d’y répondre. Ils aborderont des questions telles que : comment justifier des politiques discriminatoires, comment les limiter au maximum et comment atténuer leurs effets? Comment la transparence et la cohérence peuvent-elles contribuer à assurer une mise en œuvre éthiquement appropriée de ces mesures? Comment équilibrer les avantages conférés à ceux qui sont immunisés tout en s’attendant à ce qu’ils assument des responsabilités supplémentaires? Quel rôle l’éducation publique devrait-elle jouer?

Conférenciers

Vardit Ravitsky
Professeure agrégée, École de santé publique de l’Université de Montréal
Directrice, Axe éthique et santé, Centre de recherche en éthique

Vardit Ravitsky est professeure agrégée aux Programmes de bioéthique à l’École de santé publique de l’Université de Montréal, et directrice de l’axe éthique et santé du Centre de recherche en éthique (CRE). Elle est présidente de l’Association internationale de bioéthique, membre du Comité permanent de l’éthique des IRSC ainsi que membre du Conseil consultatif de l’Institut de génétique des IRSC et Fellow de la Fondation Trudeau 2020. Elle est également membre du groupe de travail Génomique et société du National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI). Ses recherches portent sur l’éthique de la génomique et de la reproduction et sont financées par les principaux organismes de financement du Canada. Elle a publié plus de 160 articles et commentaires sur des questions de bioéthique.

Daniel Weinstock
Directeur, Institut des politiques sociales et de la santé, Université McGill
Professeur, Faculté de droit, Université McGill

Diplômé de McGill et Oxford, il a été l'étudiant de Charles Taylor, et a suivi des cours avec John Rawls à Harvard. De 2002 à 2011, il a été directeur fondateur du Centre de recherche en éthique de l'Université de Montréal. En 2012, il est devenu professeur à la Faculté de droit et au Département de philosophie de l'Université McGill. En 2013, il a été nommé directeur de l'Institut des politiques sociales et de la santé. Depuis 2015, il est responsable de l'axe Éthique du RRSPQ.


IHSP Pizza Policy Talk Series 2019-2020

Thomson House Ballroom
12h00-13h00

Promotional Flyer for Jo Ivey Boufford Cities as Drivers of Global HealthMarch 10th, 2020

Cities as Drivers of Global Health

12:00-13:00
Thomson House Ballroom

Jo Ivey Boufford, NYU and President - International Society for Urban Health

The majority of the world’s population live in cities. Rapid urbanization is presenting challenges to all countries, but its pace and scale are greatest in low and middle income countries. While cities are the economic engines of the globe and often drive the culture, arts and innovation in a given society, they also consume most of the energy and generate the majority of air pollution and solid waste. It is therefore the health of cities, and those living and working in them, that will shape the global conditions for life and the potential for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This talk will explore the opportunities and challenges in advancing urban health.

Co-hosted by the McGill School of Urban Planning

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Promotional flyer for the seminar Human Rights of Canadian Children with Disabilities with Keiko Shikako-ThomasFebruary 18th, 2020

Human Rights of Canadian Children with Disabilities

12:00-13:00 Thomson House - Ballroom

Keiko Shikako-Thomas | McGill School of Physical and
Occupational Therapy. Canada Research Chair in Childhood
Disability: Participation and Knowledge Translation

Canada is a signatory country on the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and the Convention on the Rights of the Children. Researchers, government, community, families, youth. We're all responsible to make it happen. What can we do to support children with disabilities to achieve the full realization of their rights?

Co-hosted by the McGill School of Physical and Occupational Therapy

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Promotional Flyer for Kavi Bhalla Globalizing Vision Zero: How can developing countries improve traffic safety?

February 6th, 2020

Globalizing Vision Zero: How can developing countries improve traffic safety?

12:00 to 13:00 at Thomson House - Ballroom

Kavi Bhalla

The McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and our event co-hosts: McGill Global health Programs, the McGill Sustainability Systems Initiative (MSSI), and transportation Research at McGill (TRAM), invite you to a Pizza Policy Talk on February 6th from 12:00-13:00 at Thomson House. Prof Kavi Bhalla from University of Chicago will share with us the current status of road traffic injuries globally and what is needed to meet the Sustainable Development Goals addressing road safety. We hope you can join us. Pizza will be served!

Co-hosted by McGill Global Health Programs, the McGill Sustainability Systems Initiative & Transportation Research at McGill

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Promotional flyer for MOHSSR Let's Talk Mental Health Policy Panel Diverse perspectives on mental health reformJanuary 29th, 2020

MOHSSR Let's Talk Mental Health Policy Panel
Diverse perspectives on mental health reform

16:30 to 19:00 at Thomson House - Ballroom

The McGill Observatory on Health and Social Services Reform will be hosting a panel featuring diverse perspectives on mental health policy reform. Confirmed panelists include Dr. Mary Bartram, Director of Mental Health and Substance Use with the Mental Health Commission of Canada and MOHSSR postdoctoral researcher, and Anna Mehler Paperny, journalist and author the acclaimed Hello I Want to Die Please Fix Me: Depression in the First Person https://www.cbc.ca/books/hello-i-want-to-die-please-fix-me-1.5229499.

MOHSSR will also announce the recipients of the 2019 Maurice McGregor Awards and feature short presentations from the MOHSSR Seed Grant recipients.

MOHSSR is a joint initiative of the Institute for Health and Social Policy and Family Medicine.

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Promotional Flyer for Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing – A talk by Dr. Françoise BaylisJanuary 23rd, 2020

Altered Inheritance: CRISPR and the Ethics of Human Genome Editing – A talk by Dr. Françoise Baylis

5:30-7:30 pm with reception to follow
Elizabeth Wirth Music Building Room A-823
527 Sherbrooke St. West

Designer babies, once found only in science fiction, have become a reality. We are entering a new era of human evolution with the advent of a technology called CRISPR, which allows scientists to modify our genes. Although CRISPR shows great promise for therapeutic use, it raises thorny ethical, legal, political, and societal concerns because it can be used to make permanent changes to future generations. What if changes intended for the good turn out to have unforeseen negative effects? What if the divide between the haves and have-nots widens as a result? Who decides whether we genetically modify human beings and if so, how?

Françoise Baylis insists that we must all have a role in determining our future as a species. The scientists who develop and use genome-editing tools should not be the only ones making decisions about future uses of the technology. Such decisions must be the fruit of a broad societal consensus.

Françoise Baylis is a philosopher whose innovative work in bioethics, at the intersection of policy and practice, has stretched the very boundaries of the field. Her work challenges readers to think broadly and deeply about the direction of health, science and biotechnology. It aims to move the limits of mainstream bioethics and develop more effective ways to understand and tackle public policy challenges in Canada and abroad. Françoise Baylis is University Research Professor, NTE Impact Ethics, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University. She is a member of the Order of Canada and the Order of Nova Scotia, as well as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences. In 2017 she was awarded the Canadian Bioethics Society Lifetime Achievement Award.

Co-hosted by the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Centre de recherche en éthique de l'Université de Montréal (CRÉUM).

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Promotional flyer for Child Marriage in Canada with Alissa Koski

January 16th, 2020

Child Marriage in Canada

12:00-13:00 at Thomson - House Ballroom
Alissa Koski, Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health at McGill University

Description: “Canada has worked hard to place itself at the forefront of global efforts to eliminate child marriage in low and middle income countries. Yet despite these efforts, child marriage remains legal throughout the country. Dr. Koski will discuss her research on the prevalence of child marriage in Canada and implications for foreign policy and global monitoring of this issue.

Co-hosted by the IHSP and the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada

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2019 EVENTS

Promotional flyer for Social Innovation for Equity November 15th, 2019Social Innovation for Equity
November 15th, 2019
12h00-13h30
IHSP Charles Meredith House
1130 Pine Ave. West

 




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Promotional flyer for Foundations of Public Policy Experiments Lessons from Basic Income Pilots 11-12 November 2019Foundations of Public Policy Experiments
Lessons from Basic Income Pilots
11-12 November 2019
Institute for Health and Social Policy

To view at full size, please click on the poster icon.


Promotional Flyer for (Global) Justice and Older Persons - Healthcare and Beyond with Sridhar Venkatapuram(Global) Justice and Older Persons - Healthcare and Beyond
Sridhar Venkatapuram - Kings College London

November 7th, 2019
12h00-13h00
Thomson House Ballroom
3650 McTavish

Is healthy ageing an oxymoron? What is wellbeing for older persons? And what moral claims do older people have to good health and wellbeing? In the face of the unprecedented phenomenon of global population ageing, and the projection that the majority of the human species alive in 2050 will be over the age of 65, how societies should treat older people is a pressing ethical question. While academic literature on ethics and older people has largely focused on healthcare provision and allocation, this talk will show how a justice perspective illuminates the great injustices experienced by older persons as well as offers guidance for social action well beyond healthcare, and from the local to the global levels.

Co-hosted by the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy
and the McGill Biomedical Ethics Unit.

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Promotional flyer for Health Rights: Individual, Collective, and 'National'Health Rights: Individual, Collective, and 'National'

November 7-8, 2019,
Student Pre-Conference on November 6, 2019

IHSP 1130 Pine Avenue West room 101

This event was by invitation only.

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Promotional flyer for The Next Phase of Global HIV Care? From "public health" to "tailored care" with Anat RosenthalThe Next Phase of Global HIV Care? From "public health" to "tailored care"
Anat Rosenthal
Lecturer, Department of Health Systems Management and the Tamar Golan Africa Centre at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

October 17th, 2019
12h00-13h00
IHSP 1130 Pine Avenue West room 101

This talk explores the impact of "test and treat" policies on HIV programs in Southern Africa. Mapping the attempts made to create the analytical and clinical tools needed for the implementation of such policies, this talk addresses the challenges faced by resource-limited health systems that struggle to provide care while showing the efficacy required of them in order to continue saving lives.

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Promotional flyer for Policy Options for Canadian Pharmacare: What Implications for Québec? Featuring Dr. Colleen FloodPolicy Options for Canadian Pharmacare: What Implications for Québec?
Featuring Dr. Colleen Flood, University of Ottawa, Director, Centre for Health Law, Policy and Ethics and Dr. Marc-André Gagnon, Carleton University, School of Public Policy and Administration
October 15, 2019
15:30-16:30
1130 Pine Avenue West, H3A 1A3
Co-hosted by the McGill Observatory on Health and Social Services Reforms (MOHSSR) and the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP)

To view the poster at full size, please click on the poster icon.
 


Promotional flyer for IHSP Annual Launch 2019-2020 Québec & Montréal – Future Leaders in Accessibility?IHSP Annual Launch 2019-2020
Québec & Montréal – Future Leaders in Accessibility?

New Accessible Canada Act – Challenges & Opportunities for Québec & Montréal
October 2nd from 16h30-18h30
1130 Pine Avenue West

Moderator
Keiko Shikako-Thomas

Speakers
Senator Chantal Petitclerc
Stephanie Watt
Melanie Benard
Tiiu Poldma

To view poster at full size, please click on the poster icon.

 


Promotional flyer for Psychedelic Research: Implications for Palliative Care and End-of-Life Existential Distress with Anthony BossisAnthony Bossis, PhD, NYU School of Medicine
Psychedelic Research: Implications for Palliative Care and End-of-Life Existential Distress
September 12, 2019 from 18:00-19:00
McIntyre Medical Building
Palmer Auditorium, 6th floor
3655 Promedade Sir William Osler

Hosted by the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy. Co-hosted by Palliative Care McGill, the Division of Social and Transcultural Psychiatry, and the Culture, Mind and Brain program.

Please click the poster icon to view at full size.

 


Promotional flyer for the Pizza Policy Talk 2019-2020 series

Pizza Policy Series Promotional Flyer

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May

17th  9:30-11:00 a.m. Elisa Gordon "African American Living Kidney Donors’ Preferences for Informed Consent for APOL1 Genetic Testing"

Promotional Flyer for Elisa Gordon "African American Living Kidney Donors’ Preferences for Informed Consent for APOL1 Genetic Testing"This presentation will briefly review racial/ethnic disparities in living kidney donation as background for examining the ethical dilemma of whether or not APOL1 genetic testing should be incorporated into routine donor evaluation. Patient-centered data on living donors’ attitudes about, and preferences for informed consent for APOL1 genetic testing will be presented to guide the ethical analysis.

This event is co-sponsored by the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Centre de recherche en éthique. No registration required.

 

April 3, 2019

“More than a Footnote: Women and Girls with Disabilities in Canada.”

Promotional Flyer for “More than a Footnote: Women and Girls with Disabilities in Canada” with Bonnie Brayton

Co-sponsored by the McGill Nursing Collaborative for Education and Innovation in Patient and Family-Centred Care, the McGill Women’s Health Advocacy Club, the Disabled Women’s Network (DAWN) Canada and the Institute for Health and Social Policy (IHSP).

Speaker: Bonnie Brayton, National Executive Director of the DisAbled Women’s Network (DAWN) Canada.

A recognized leader in both the feminist and disability movements, Bonnie Brayton is a formidable advocate for women with disabilities here in Canada and internationally.

Description: Women with disability living in Canada face a host of structural barriers to their access to essential conditions of daily living. Multiple intersecting identities of gender, disability, race, sexuality and class amongst others, shape their experiences within society. Women with disability are diverse and equally possessing of strengths, capacities, unique preferences and desire for self-determination as all people. However, they are significantly more likely to experience poverty, gender-based violence, criminalization and systematic denial of their essential human rights, including those around health and healthcare. Healthcare systems overwhelmingly lack policy, accessible physical and procedural infrastructure and services that are inclusive of women with disability. Healthcare professionals and support personnel have inconsistent knowledge and awareness of the experiences and needs of women with disability.

Join us and learn what we can do collectively to begin to contribute to gender and disability responsive health systems. We welcome all interested McGill University students, faculty, researchers, healthcare professionals and people with an interest in women and disability.

This is a #WeDeliver 2019 Mobilizer event.

Wednesday April 3rd, 16:30 – 18:00
Ingram School of Nursing
680 Sherbrooke Ouest, Room 1825

April

3 Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry - "What is Disability? Theoretical Strategies to Define a Contested Concept"
Promotional flyer for Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry - "What is Disability? Theoretical Strategies to Define a Contested Concept"The concept of disability is used across a variety of contexts (e.g. medical, legal, artistic) to describe different phenomena and prescribe distinct behaviours or norms. The definitional challenge is not only that the category of “disabled people” is heterogenous, but also that what “disability” should denote, primarily or exclusively, is controversial amongst both theorists and practitioners. This conceptual breadth is far from innocuous: disability models have the potential to influence public policies, culture and interactions, by suggesting what rights, duties and social expectations disability entails. They can both benefit and harm people categorized as “disabled”.

Instead of examining those various definitions and arguing in favour of one of them, this essay considers the unavoidable cultural polysemy of disability and contrasts the appeal and limitations of the main theoretical strategies to manage it. Some disability models deny that competing understandings of disability are valid, while others seek to determine procedures through which disabilities will be defined and assessed and still others conceptualize disability in a more culturally malleable way.

Bio

Jonas-Sébastien Beaudry is an Assistant Professor of Law at McGill University (joint appointment with the Institute for Health and Social Policy) and a member of the Quebec Bar. His publications include a book on freedom of expression in Latin America and articles in the areas of legal history, human rights, ethics and disability law. He collaborates with disability organizations on public policy issues and is an Advisor to the Vulnerable Persons Standard.

March 26, 2019

Promotional Flyer for anel Discussion "Approaches to Universal Health Care: Perspectives from Taiwan"Panel Discussion "Approaches to Universal Health Care: Perspectives from Taiwan"

Co-hosted with the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Department of East Asian Studies.

The McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and the McGill Department of East Asian Studies are pleased to be co-hosting a panel of Taiwanese experts on “Taiwan’s Health Care Paradigm”. Taiwan’s universal health care system is often looked to as a model for pursuing both health equity and efficiency. It embraces three levels of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention under a framework of evidence-based medicine and public health.

Tuesday March 26, 12:00 – 13:30
Charles Meredith House
1130 Pine Avenue Ouest, Room 101

March

21 Chris Barrington-Leigh - "What Makes Societies Happy? The Dawn of Happiness-guided Policy"

Promotional flyer for hris Barrington-Leigh - "What Makes Societies Happy? The Dawn of Happiness-guided Policy"Are we ready to enact happiness-guided policies? It has been four decades since economists began to be interested in a subjective measure, "life satisfaction", as an overall assessment of well-being. The science of "happiness" is now rich and deep, but only in the last few years have those studying it felt confident enough to significantly turn their attention to proposing concrete government policies.

Recently back from the Global Dialogue on Happiness at the World Government Summit, Chris Barrington-Leigh, Associate Professor at McGill University’s Institute for Health and Social Policy and the McGill School of Environment, will discuss his recent work and the move towards a world in which policy is accountable to human-centred outcomes.

Please join the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Max Bell School of Public Policy in celebrating the International Day of Happiness with this discussion led by Chris Barrington-Leigh.

Watch the video.

 

14 Adam Cureton - "Expressing Respect for People with Disabilities in Clinical Settings"

Promotional Flyer for Adam Cureton - "Expressing Respect for People with Disabilities in Clinical Settings"A brief abstract: All too often, the medical community treats people with disabilities in insulting, offensive and demeaning ways. Medical staff often express disrespectful attitudes about disabled people through the meanings attached to the environments they create, the policies they maintain and the manner in which they interact with disabled patients. People with disabilities deserve to be treated justly, humanely and respectfully in clinical settings, but we also deserve to be shown respect in those contexts as well. The aim of this presentation is to explore, interpret and assess these ideas by, first, describing a general way of thinking about respect, disrespect and expressions of those attitudes, second, using this model to explain how medical staff in clinical settings might express disrespectful attitudes about people with disabilities and, third, suggesting some measures they can take to avoid or counteract those messages and to show disabled people positive signs of respect in clinical contexts.

 

February 

5 Daniel Béland - "Older and Wiser? Reflections on the Past and Future of Canada's Public Pension System"

Promotional Flyer for Daniel Béland - "Older and Wiser? Reflections on the Past and Future of Canada's Public Pension System"

For more information about our other past events, please visit our Past Seminars page.

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