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History


Charles Meredith HouseThe McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy is housed at Charles Meredith House, Montreal. The Institute was founded in 2007 as part of McGill’s cross-faculty Health and Society initiative. The Institute’s mission speaks not only to McGill’s longstanding commitment to excellence in research issues at the intersection of Medicine and the Arts, but also the University’s pre-eminent position in public policy.

The Institute supports world-class research on how social conditions impact population health and welfare.  In particular it aims to translate research findings in the area of social inequalities and health outcome into concrete provincial, national and international policies.  Through the generosity of donors, the Institute also administers two programs: the McBurney Latin America Program, which focuses on training in Latin America; and the Healthier Societies Initiative, which examines OECD best practices in health policy and services.   

The Institute gratefully acknowledges funding by the Dean of Medicine and the Dean of Arts, as well as by the Vice-President (Research) and the University Provost. We invite you to read more about the Institute’s activities and opportunities for student internships both at McGill and abroad.

To learn more about past initiatives, visit Past Research.

 Founding Director

Jody Heymann was the Founding Director of the Institute for Health and Social Policy.  Currently Dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Heymann also founded the World Policy Analysis Center.  World is the first global initiative to examine social policy in all 193 UN nations. This initiative provides an in-depth look at how social policies affect the ability of individuals, families and communities to meet their health needs. She has authored and edited over 200 publications, including Children's Chances (Harvard University Press, 2013), Profit at the Bottom of the Ladder (Harvard Business Press, 2009), Raising the Global Floor (Stanford University Press, 2009), and Forgotten Families (Oxford University Press, 2006. Deeply committed to translating research into policies and programs that will improve individual and population health, Dr. Heymann has worked with leaders in North American, European, African, and Latin American governments as well as a wide range of intergovernmental organizations including the WHO, ILO, UNDESA, UNICEF, and UNESCO.