Comparative Law News

Competition Policy for the New Era Insights from the BRICS Countries

Juris Diversitas - Sat, 03/10/2018 - 13:44
Competition Policy for the New Era. Insights from the BRICS CountriesEdited by Tembinkosi Bonakele, Eleanor Fox, and Liberty Mncube
  • Written by well-known academic and practising economists and lawyers from both developed and developing countries. Focuses on a broader view of competition policy in BRICS and developing countries, including concepts such as efficiency and consumer welfare, issues of distribution, equity, and fairness. Each chapter is organized around a central argument made by its author(s) in relation to issue or case study, making every contribution a valuable freestanding contribution to the literature. Provides a number of viewpoints of what competition law and policy mean both in theory and practice in a development context through the use of insightful case studies. (Subjects: Competition Law; Comparative Competition Law)
Categories: Comparative Law News

JOURNAL: Journal of International Dispute Settlement, IX (2018), Issue 1 (March)


(Source: Oxford University Press)
The Journal of International Dispute Settlement’s newest issue focuses on “Shakespeare and International Dispute Settlement”:
Special Issue: Shakespeare and International Dispute Settlement Guest Editors: François Ost and Thomas Schultz
ARTICLES
Shakespearean Legal Thought in International Dispute Settlement Thomas Schultz; François OstJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 1–27, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idx021
International Adjudication, Rhetoric and Storytelling Andrea BianchiJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 28–44, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idx001
Literary and Dramatic Disputes in Shakespeare’s Time Barbara LauriatJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 45–57, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idx006
Sovereigns, Sterling and ‘Some Bastards too!’: Brexit Seen from Shakespeare’s King John Gary WattJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 58–82, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idw028
The ‘Great Matter’ of King Henry VIII Ian WardJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 83–102, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idw029
To Be or Not to Be a (Dead) Father Maria AristodemouJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 103–122, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idx010
Measure for Measure on Trial—A Shakespearean Mock Trial Lorenzo Zucca; Lord JudgeJournal of International Dispute Settlement, Volume 9, Issue 1, 1 March 2018, Pages 123–143, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnlids/idx013
For more information, see the journal’s web link.
Categories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Emiliano Jerónimo BUIS, Taming Ares: Interstate Law, and Humanitarian Discourse in Classical Greece [Legal History Library/Studies in the History of International Law, vol. 26/10; ed. Randall LESAFFER] (Leiden/Boston: Martinus Nijhoff/Brill, 2018...

(image source: Brill)
Book abstract:
In Taming Ares Emiliano J. Buis examines the sources of classical Greece to challenge both the state-centeredness of mainstream international legal history and the omnipresence of war and excessive violence in ancient times. Making ample use of epigraphic as well as literary, rhetorical, and historiographical sources, the book offers the first widespread account of the narrative foundations of the (il)legality of warfare in the classical Hellenic world. In a clear yet sophisticated manner, Buis convincingly proves that the traditionally neglected study of the performance of ancient Greek poleis can contribute to a better historical understanding of those principles of international law underlying the practices and applicable rules on the use of force and the conduct of hostilities.On the author:
Emiliano Jerónimo Buis, PhD in Classics and Postdoctoral Degree in Law (Universidad de Buenos Aires) is Professor of International Law and Ancient Greek at that university and at UNICEN, as well as researcher at the CONICET in Argentina. He has widely published on the theory and history of international law, ancient Greek literature (especially drama) and Athenian law.Table of contents:
Foreword   Randall Lesaffer Preliminary Considerations Acknowledgments List of Figures and Maps Introduction  1  Between Ares and Athena  2  In-between Custom and Convenience: Analyzing the Restrictive Discourse of War  3  Towards International Law in the Ancient World: Practices and Contexts  4  Inhumane Acts, Human Words: Analyzing the Restrictive Discourse of War
Part 1: The Concepts1 Normativity, Hegemony, and Democratic Performance: The Case of Classical Athens  1  International Normativity, Subordination, and Political Imposition in the Ancient World  2  Justice, Law, Laws and Decrees: The Issue of Terminology  3  Nomothesia: The Act of Legislating  4  Dramatic Competitions and Athenian Festivals  5 Justice as Spectacle in Athens: Judicial praxis  6  The Assembly, the Theater, and the Courts: Performative Activities of Democracy   Summation: Democracy as Performative Ritual 2 Greek poleis and Their International Subjectivity  1  Towards an Archaeology of the Subject: Did Legal Entities Have a Legal Personality in the Greek World?  2  The Role of the polis in the Signing of Treaties during the Peloponnesian War   Summation: International Subjectivity in Ruins
Part 2: The Rules3 Ius ad bellum and Its Limits on Inter-polis Law  1  The Rhetoric of the Use of Armed Force in the Greek World  2  The Vocabulary of the Grounds: The Spoken and the Unspoken in Thucydides  3  Considerations on Guilt, Responsibility, Motivation and Encouraging: Helen’s Case  4  Exoneration from the Attack: The Adversary’s Responsibility  5  A ‘Legal’ Rhetoric of Self-Defense?   Summation: Restraining the Use of Armed Force 4 Ius in bello and Its Limits in Inter-polis Law  1  Greek Warfare between Military Necessity and Limitation  2  The Legal Matrix: The Foundations of “Common,” “Universal,” Inter-polis, and Intra-Hellenic Law  3  Geneva in Greece: The nomos of the Greeks with Respect to the Protection of Victims and Practices in Wartime: Humanitarian Limits?  4  The Hague in Greece: The nomos of the Greeks with Respect to the Restriction of Means and Methods of Warfare: Humanitarian Limits?  5 Responding to Atrocity: Prosecution of War Crimes?   Summation: Towards a Framework of Restraint Conclusions: About Apples, Branches, and Humanitarian Strategies Appendix A: Chart of Treaties Signed by Greek poleis during the Peloponnesian War (431–404) Appendix B: Digital Images of Treaties and Decrees Bibliography  1 Ancient Sources (Critical Apparatus of Greek Texts, Translations and Comments)  2 Critical Bibliography  3  Instrumenta studiorum Index
More information with Brill.
Categories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Jennifer PITTS, Boundaries of the International : Law and Empire (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2018). ISBN 9780674980815, €40.50.


(Source: Harvard University Press)
Harvard University Press has published a book dealing with the law of nations in the 18th and 19thcentury, in the context of the relations between European and non-European states and empires.
ABOUT
It is commonly believed that international law originated in relations among European states that respected one another as free and equal. In fact, as Jennifer Pitts shows, international law was forged at least as much through Europeans’ domineering relations with non-European states and empires, leaving a legacy still visible in the unequal structures of today’s international order.
Pitts focuses on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the great age of imperial expansion, as European intellectuals and administrators worked to establish and justify laws to govern emerging relationships with non-Europeans. Relying on military and commercial dominance, European powers dictated their own terms on the basis of their own norms and interests. Despite claims that the law of nations was a universal system rooted in the values of equality and reciprocity, the laws that came to govern the world were parochial and deeply entangled in imperialism. Legal authorities, including Emer de Vattel, John Westlake, and Henry Wheaton, were key figures in these developments. But ordinary diplomats, colonial administrators, and journalists played their part too, as did some of the greatest political thinkers of the time, among them Montesquieu and John Stuart Mill.
Against this growing consensus, however, dissident voices as prominent as Edmund Burke insisted that European states had extensive legal obligations abroad that ought not to be ignored. These critics, Pitts shows, provide valuable resources for scrutiny of the political, economic, and legal inequalities that continue to afflict global affairs.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction: Empire and International Law2. Oriental Despotism and the Ottoman Empire3. Nations and Empires in Vattel’s World4. Critical Legal Universalism in the Eighteenth Century5. The Rise of Positivism?6. Historicism in Victorian International LawEpilogueNotesAcknowledgmentsIndex
More information to be found on the publisher’s website
Categories: Comparative Law News

JOURNAL: American Journal of Legal history LVII (2017), No. 3 (September)

(image source: OUP)
"From Petitions for Gratuities to Claims for Damages: Personal Injuries and Railroads During the Industrialization of the United States" (Robert J. Kaczorowski) (261-315) "Acts of the “Most Sanguinary Rage”: Spousal Murder in Montreal, 1825-1850" (Ian C. Pilarczyk) (316-353)
"‘His Barbarous Usages’, Her ‘Evil Tongue’: Character and Class in Trials for Spouse Murder at the Old Bailey, 1674-1790" (Andrea McKenzie) (354-384)
Book reviews
Richard Alan Ryerson, John Adams' Republic: The One, the Few, and the ManyLuke Mayville, John Adams and the Fear of American Oligarchy (Tom Cutterham)

Dale Gibson, Law, Life and Government at Red River, Volume 1, Settlement and Governance, 1812-1872 (Russell C. Smandych)

Laura Weinrib, The Taming of Free Speech: America’s Civil Liberties Compromise (Anders Walker)

Peter Wallenstein, Race, Sex, and the Freedom to Marry: Loving v. Virginia (Alison Lefkovitz)
Categories: Comparative Law News

JOURNAL: American Journal of Legal History LVIII (2018), Nr. 1 (March)

(image source: OUP)
Editorial (Alfred L. Brophy & Stefan Vogenauer) (1-3)
“In a Democracy We Should Distribute the Lawyers”: The Campaign for a Federal Legal Service, 1933--1945 (Daniel R. Ernst) (4-55)

"The Lawfulness of Gender Reassignment Surgery" (Penney Lewis) (56-85)

“Patent Property”: The Fulton Lawyers and the Franchising of Progress (Timothy Milford) (87-125)

Slavery, Race, and Outlawry: The Concept of the Outlaw in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionist Rhetoric (Deborah A. Rosen) (126-156)

Book reviews
Claire Zalc, Dénaturalisés. Les retraits de nationalité sous Vichy (Guillaume Richard)

Alec Stone Sweet and Florian Grisel, The Evolution of International Arbitration. Judicialization, Governance, Legitimacy. (Mikaël Schinazi)

Antonio Padoa-Schioppa, Storia del diritto in Europa. Dal medioevo all’età contemporaneaAntonio Padoa-Schioppa, A History of Law in Europe: From the Early Middle Ages to the Twentieth Century (Annamaria Monti)

Olivier Jouanjan and Élisabeth Zoller eds, Le « moment 1900 ». Critique sociale et sociologique du droit en Europe et aux États-Unis (Laetitia Guerlain)

More information with OUP.
Categories: Comparative Law News

COLLOQUIUM: Les Noces de Philologie et de Guillaume Budé (3-5 May 2018, Paris)



(Source: École nationale des chartes)
Please hereby find the following communication regarding a conference on Guillaume Budé, to be held in Paris coming May. 

Christine Bénévent, professeur d’histoire du livre et de bibliographie à l'École, organise avec Romain Menini (Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée) et Luigi-Alberto Sanchi (Cnrs / U. Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas), le colloque intitulé « Les Noces de Philologie et de Guillaume Budé. L’œuvre de Guillaume Budé au prisme du savoir humaniste cinq siècles et demi après sa naissance ».Comité scientifiquesous la présidence de Marc Fumaroli, de l’Académie française : Patrick Arabeyre, Jean Céard, Max Engammare, Mireille Huchon, Claude La Charité, Michel Magnien, Olivier Millet et Caroline Trotot.
Du jeudi 3 mai 2018 au samedi 5 mai 2018
VENUE
École des chartes au 65, rue de Richelieu, Paris 2e (salle Delisle) ; Cour de cassation au 5, quai de l'Horloge, Paris 1er ; Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas au 12, place du Panthéon Paris 5e
CONTACT
→ christine.benevent_at_enc-sorbonne.fr→ romain.menini_at_u-pem.fr→ luigi-alberto.sanchi_at_u-paris2.fr
ABOUT
Au cours de son existence bien remplie, Guillaume Budé (1468-1540) a conçu, publié, augmenté nombre d’oeuvres dont la valeur littéraire et la portée scientifique ont profondément marqué son époque et la postérité, à l’égal de son contemporain Érasme. Or les productions de Budé sont connues de façon inégale, demeurent parfois peu étudiées, non traduites, dépourvues d’éditions modernes, malgré un regain d’intérêt qui s’est déployé tout au long du xxᵉ siècle comme en ce début du xxiᵉ.Le colloque « Les Noces de Philologie et de Guillaume Budé » a pour ambition de revenir, à la lumière des recherches les plus récentes, sur les différentes facettes d’une œuvre polycentrique, allant de l’essai historique novateur qu’est le De Asse et partibius eius à l’épistolographie humaniste en grec et latin, des traductions de textes grecs en latin (de Plutarque à Basile de Césarée) à la lexicographie grecque (Commentarii linguæ Græcæ), de l’exégèse des sources du droit romain (Annotationes in Pandectas) aux recommandations politiques de l’« Institution du prince », en passant par les considérations morales et religieuses confiées tour à tour aux lettres, aux digressions et à deux traités indépendants, De Transitu hellenismi ad christianismum et De Contemptu rerum fortuitarum.
À travers l’analyse de ce corpus multiforme, il s’agit en premier lieu de retracer les différentes sources de Budé, intellectuelles et matérielles, filtrées par sa formation hybride de juriste humaniste au sein des cénacles de l’humanisme parisien, depuis le cercle d’hellénistes alimenté par Georges Hermonyme de Sparte, puis par Janus Lascaris, et le groupe de savants réuni autour de Jacques Lefèvre d’Étaples, jusqu’aux premiers lecteurs du roi et aux imprimeurs humanistes de la génération de Robert Estienne, sans oublier sa riche expérience à la cour. Il importe également de bien comprendre les méthodes de travail d’un atelier si surprenant, dont la documentation existante fournit d’intéressants échantillons en termes de cahiers autographes, d’annotations marginales, de réécritures diverses. Le style budéen pourrait aussi faire l’objet de nouvelles investigations : comment définir et caractériser la latinité si singulière du prosateur ? Avons-nous mesuré toutes les implications de son recours — et de son amour — pour la langue grecque ? Y aurait-il une manière philologique propre à l’auteur du De Asse, prompt à mettre en œuvre les savoirs antiques ? On n’oubliera pas que Budé le latiniste prit aussi sa part à l’illustration de la langue française, que ce soit avec l’« Institution du Prince » ou avec l’« Epitome » du De Asse.
À la convergence de plusieurs disciplines, nous nous proposons d’identifier les parcours que Guillaume Budé a tracés, de cerner les passerelles entre les différents noyaux de son écriture, et de reconstituer l’unité intellectuelle de son œuvre à une époque où la diffusion du patrimoine écrit de l’Antiquité achevait sa première grande saison et ouvrait l’époque des études philologiques spécialisées.
PROGRAMME 
Jeudi 3 maiÉcole nationale des chartes, 65, rue de Richelieu, salle Delisle
  • 9 h 15 : accueil par Michelle Bubenicek, directrice de l’École nationale des chartes
  • 9 h 30 : ouverture du colloque par Patrick Boucheron (Collège de France)
I. Guillaume Budé hellénistePrésidence : Pierre Petitmengin (Ens, professeur émérite)
  • 10 h : Stefano Martinelli-Tempesta (U. Milan), « Dall’Italia alla Francia. Guillaume Budé e le sue traduzioni dal greco »
  • 10 h 30 : Raf Van Rooy (KU Leuven), « Guillaume Budé and the plurality of Greek »
  • 11 h : pause
  • 11 h 30 : Brigitte Mondrain (Ephe), « Les manuscrits grecs de Guillaume Budé »
  • 12 h : Patrick Morantin (BnF), « Budé, Homère et la tradition grecque »
II. Budé lecteur des Anciens et des ModernesPrésidence : Richard Cooper (U. Oxford, professeur)
  • 14 h 15 : Virginie Leroux (Ephe), « Guillaume Budé, lecteur de Martianus Capella »
  • 14 h 45 : Tristan Vigliano (U. Lyon 2), « Guillaume Budé, lecteur du Novum itinerarium de Ludovico di Varthema »
  • 15 h 15 : pause
  • 15 h 45 : Jeroen De Keyser (KU Leuven), « The Prince and the Humanist : Guillaume Budé’s De Philologia and its antecedents in Italian Humanism »
  • 16 h 15 : Francesca Mattei (Humboldt-U., Berlin) et Francesca Salatin (IuavVenise), « Uno, nessuno, centomila. Guillaume Budé e il De Architectura »
Vendredi 4 maiCour de cassation – 5, quai de l’Horloge, en Grand’chambre
Inscription préalable obligatoire sur le site www.courdecassation.fr
  • 9 h 15 : accueil
  • 9 h 30 : ouverture de la journée par Marc Fumaroli, de l’Académie française (sous réserve)
III. Humanisme juridique, humanisme politiquePrésidence : Jean Barthélemy (avocat honoraire au Conseil d'État et à la Cour de cassation, ancien président de l'Ordre, président de l'Aslab)
  • 9 h 45 : Patrick Arabeyre (École des chartes), « Les Bartolistes ont-ils lu Budé ? De l’influence de l’humanisme juridique sur les travaux des juristes français de la première moitié du xviᵉ siècle »
  • 10 h 15 : Jean Céard (U. Nanterre, professeur émérite), « Un humaniste au travail : les Annotationes in Pandectas »
  • 10 h 45 : pause
  • 11 h 15 : Marie-Dominique Couzinet (U. Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne), « Philosophie et histoire dans l’Institution du prince »
  • 11 h 45 : Michel Magnien (U. Sorbonne Nouvelle), « Guillaume Budé et l’Utopie de Thomas More »
IV. Guillaume Budé auteur et lexicographePrésidence : Caroline Trotot (U. Paris-Est, professeur, vice-présidente adjointe à la recherche Upem)
  • 14 h : Martine Furno (U. Grenoble-Alpes), « Robert et Henri Estienne lexicographes, lecteurs de Budé lexicographe »
  • 14 h 30 : Mireille Huchon (U. Paris-Sorbonne), « Guillaume Budé “lumière françoise”»
  • 15 h : pause
  • 15 h 30 : Claude La Charité (U. du Québec à Rimouski), « Revisit et propria manu emendavit ipse Budæus : l’exemplaire du De contemptu rerum fortuitarum de la bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève »
  • 16 h : Olivier Millet (U. Paris-Sorbonne), « L’édition de Bâle (1556) des Opera de Budé »
Samedi 5 maiUniversité Paris Panthéon-Assas – 12, place du Panthéon, salle des Conseils
  • 9 h 30 : accueil
V. Autour du De AssePrésidence : Jean Céard (U. Paris-Nanterre, professeur émérite)
  • 9 h 45 : Marc Bompaire (Ephe), « Guillaume Budé témoin des monnaies et des finances de son temps »
  • 10 h 15 : Andrew Burnett (U. Londres), « Roman coins in the De Asse »
  • 10 h 45 : pause
  • 11 h 15 : Scott Blanchard (U. Misericordia, Pennsylvania), « Le De Asse de Budé à l’aune du livre V du De Politia litteraria (ca 1450, impr. 1539) d’Angelo Decembrio »
  • 11 h 45 : Élise Rajchenbach (U. Saint-Étienne), « Charles Fontaine, passeur du De Asse »
VI. Réceptions de l’œuvre de Guillaume BudéPrésidence : Claude La Charité (U. du Québec à Rimouski, professeur, chaire de recherche du Canada en histoire littéraire et patrimoine imprimé)
  • 14 h : Hélène Cazes (U. Victoria), « Le « héros » d’Henri II Estienne : Guillaume Budé dans le Thesaurus Linguæ Græcæ, entre hommages et attaques »
  • 14 h 30 : Max Engammare (U. Genève), « Un mal rasé. La réception de Guillaume Budé dans le monde réformé »
  • 15 h : pause
  • 15 h 30 : Marc Laureys (U. Bonn), « Jacques Toussain commentateur de Guillaume Budé : à propos des annotations par Jacques Toussain des Epistulœ et du De contemptu rerum fortuitarum »
  • 16 h : Lyse Roy (U. du Québec), « Définir Guillaume Budé. L’humaniste dans les dictionnaires de la première modernité »
  • 16 h 30 : Richard Cooper (U. Oxford), « Guillaume Budé entre “ma maistresse Philologie” et le “cryme de flatterie” »
Conclusion du colloque
Ce colloque est organisé par Christine Bénévent (Enc), Romain Menini (U. Paris-Est) et Luigi-Alberto Sanchi (Cnrs / Paris Panthéon Assas), avec le soutien du Centre Interuniversitaire de recherche sur la première modernité (Cirem), de l’Institut universitaire de France, de la Cour de cassation, de l’Aslab et de la mission aux Commémorations nationales. Il bénéficie du parrainage de l’Association Guillaume Budé et du Collège de France.
Deux présentations de livres en lien avec le colloque sont organisées à la Bibliothèque nationale de France (salle Van Praet, visites guidées sur inscription) et à la Cour de cassation.
For more information, please see the website of the École nationale des chartes.
Categories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Heikki Pihlajamäki, Albrecht Cordes, Serge Dauchy and Dave De ruysscher, eds., Understanding the Sources of Early Modern and Modern Commercial Law - Courts, Statutes, Contracts, and Legal Scholarship [Studies in the History of Private Law] ...


(Source: Brill|Nijhoff)
Brill has just published the e-book of “Understanding the Sources of Early Modern and Modern Commercial Law” in its Studies in the History of Private Law series. The hardback is due to be published later this month.
ABOUT
The contributions of Understanding the Sources of Early Modern and Modern Commercial Law: Courts, Statutes, Contracts, and Legal Scholarship show the wealth of sources which historians of commercial law use to approach their subject. Depending on the subject, historical research on mercantile law must be ready to open up to different approaches and sources in a truly imaginative and interdisciplinary way. This, more than many other branches of law, has always been largely non-state law. Normative, ‘official’, sources are important in commercial law as well, but other sources are often needed to complement them. The articles of the volume present an excellent assemblage of those sources. Anja Amend-Traut, Albrecht Cordes, Serge Dauchy, Dave De ruysscher, Olivier Descamps, Ricardo Galliano Court, Eberhard Isenmann, Mia Korpiola, Peter Oestmann, Heikki Pihlajamäki, Edouard Richard, Margrit Schulte Beerbühl, Guido Rossi, Bram Van Hofstraeten, Boudewijn Sirks, Alain Wijffels, and Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
List of Illustrations Notes on Contributors 1 Introduction   Heikki Pihlajamäki, Albrecht Cordes, Serge Dauchy and Dave De ruysscher 2 Mercantile Conflict Resolution in Practice: Connecting Legal and Diplomatic Sources from Danzig c. 1460–1580   Justyna Wubs-Mrozewicz3 Justitia in Commerciis: Public Governance and Commercial Litigation before the Great Council of Mechlin in the Late Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Century   Alain Wijffels 4 Honore et utile: The Approaches and Practice of Sixteenth-century Genoese Merchant Custom   Ricardo Galliano Court 5 The Abandonment to the Insurers in Sixteenth-century Insurance Practice: Comparative Remarks and (A Few) Methodological Notes   Guido Rossi 6 Historiographical Opportunities of Notarized Partnership Agreements Recorded in the Early Modern Low Countries  Bram Van Hofstraeten 7 How Normative were Merchant Guidebooks? Of Customs, Practices, and … Good Advice (Antwerp, Sixteenth Century)  Dave De ruysscher 8 Sources of Commercial Law in the Dutch Republic and Kingdom   Boudewijn Sirks 9 The Files and Exhibits of the Imperial Chamber Court and Aulic Council as Sources of Commercial Law   Anja Amend-Traut 10 Legal, Moral-Theological, and Genuinely Economic Opinions on Questions of Trade and Economy in Fifteenth- and Early Sixteenth-century Germany   Eberhard Isenmann 11 The Birth of Commercial Law in Early Modern Sweden: Sources and Historiography  Heikki Pihlajamäki 12 Svea Court of Appeal Records as a Source of Commercial Law: The Founding Year of 1614   Mia Korpiola 13 Tracing the Speculation Bubble of 1799 in Newspapers, Court Records, and Other Sources   Margrit Schulte Beerbühl 14 The Rise of Usages in French Commercial Law and Jurisprudence (Seventeenth-Nineteenth Centuries): Some Examples   Edouard Richard 15 On the Origins of the French Commercial Code: Vicissitudes of the Gorneau Draft   Olivier Descamps 16 Court Records as Sources for the History of Commercial Law: The Oberappellationsgericht Lübeck as a Commercial Court (1820–1879)  Peter Oestmann Index of Names Index of Places Index of Subjects
READERSHIP
All interested in the history of commercial law, legal history, economic history, and history of the early modern period.
For more information, please visit the publisher’s website

Categories: Comparative Law News

BOOK: Paula Jean PERLMAN, Ancient Greek Law in the 21st Century [Ashley and Peter Larkin Endowment in Greek and Roman Culture] (Austin: University of Texas, 2018). ISBN 978-1-4773-1521-7, $45.00



(Source: University of Texas Press)
The University of Texas Press has published a new book on Ancient Greek Law.
DESCRIPTION The ancient Greeks invented written law. Yet, in contrast to later societies in which law became a professional discipline, the Greeks treated laws as components of social and political history, reflecting the daily realities of managing society. To understand Greek law, then, requires looking into extant legal, forensic, and historical texts for evidence of the law in action. From such study has arisen the field of ancient Greek law as a scholarly discipline within classical studies, a field that has come into its own since the 1970s.
This edited volume charts new directions for the study of Greek law in the twenty-first century through contributions from eleven leading scholars. The essays in the book’s first section reassess some of the central debates in the field by looking at questions about the role of law in society, the notion of “contracts,” feuding and revenge in the court system, and legal protections for slaves engaged in commerce. The second section breaks new ground by redefining substantive areas of law such as administrative law and sacred law, as well as by examining sources such as Hellenistic inscriptions that have been comparatively neglected in recent scholarship. The third section evaluates the potential of methodological approaches to the study of Greek law, including comparative studies with other cultures and with modern legal theory. The volume ends with an essay that explores pedagogy and the relevance of teaching Greek law in the twenty-first century.
CONTENTS
-        Acknowledgments-        Introduction (Adriaan Lanni and Robert W. Wallace)-        1. Administering Justice in Ancient Athens: Framework and Core Principles (Robert W. Wallace)-        2. Revenge and Punishment (Eva Cantarella)-        3. Hyperides’s Against Athenogenes and the Athenian Law on Agreements (Michael Gagarin)-        4. Slaves Operating Businesses: Legal Ramifications for Ancient Athens—and for Modern Scholarship (Edward E. Cohen)-        5. Toward a New Shape of the Relationship between Public and Private Law in Ancient Greece (Alberto Maffi)-        6. “Heiliges Recht” and “Heilige Gesetze”: Law, Religion, and Magic in Ancient Greece (Martin Dreher)-        7. Summary Fines in Greek Inscriptions and the Question of “Greek Law” (Lene Rubinstein)-        8. Soft Law in Ancient Greece? (Julie Velissaropoulos-Karakostas)-        9. From Anthropology to Sociology: New Directions in Ancient Greek Law Research (Adriaan Lanni)-        10. Oral Law in Ancient Greece? (Mogens Herman Hansen)-        11. The Future of Classical Oratory (Gerhard Thür)-        Contributors-        Index Locorum-        Index
For more information, see the website of the publisher.
Categories: Comparative Law News

NOTICE: New Law Research Centers Papers series: MPI Luxembourg for Procedural Law Research Paper Series


(Source: Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for Procedural Law)
Please hereby find the following announcement from the Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for Procedural Law regarding a new Law Research Centers Papers series.

We are pleased to announce Max Planck Institute Luxembourg for Procedural Law has started a new Law Research Centers Papers series within the Legal Scholarship Network (LSN). MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE LUXEMBOURG FOR PROCEDURAL LAW RESEARCH PAPER SERIES View Papers: http://www.ssrn.com/link/Max-Planck-Luxembourg-RES.htmlSubscribe: http://hq.ssrn.com/jourInvite.cfm?link=Max-Planck-Luxembourg-RES
The Institute is proud to announce the launch of the 'MPI Luxembourg for Procedural Law Research Paper Series' on SSRN. The series gathers pre-publication versions of academic articles, book chapters, or reviews as well as intermediary research reports on various legal issues. All manuscripts found here are also offered on the Institute's website and are released by each author in the interest of advancing scholarship.

The quality of the research papers is guaranteed by a rigorous internal review, and final approval is given by at least one of the Directors of the Institute. The content is the responsibility of individual authors. Papers may be downloaded by individuals, for their own use, subject to the ordinary copyright rules.

The series will actively grow its content throughout this year and the years ahead. Although the papers included on the SSRN series begin in 2018, note that all previous contributions can be found on our website.

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE
You can subscribe to the eJournal at no cost, by clicking on the "subscribe" link listed above.

You can change your eJournal subscriptions by signing into 
The quality of the research papers is guaranteed by a rigorous internal review, and final approval is given by at least one of the Directors of the Institute. The content is the responsibility of individual authors. Papers may be downloaded by individuals, for their own use, subject to the ordinary copyright rules.
The series will actively grow its content throughout this year and the years ahead. Although the papers included on the SSRN series begin in 2018, note that all previous contributions can be found on our website.
HOW TO SUBSCRIBEYou can subscribe to the eJournal at no cost, by clicking on the "subscribe" link listed above.
You can change your eJournal subscriptions by signing into SSRN User HQ. If you have any problems, please contact us for assistance by email: Support@SSRN.com or by phone: 877-SSRNHelp (877 777 6435) in the United States, or +1 585 442 8170 outside of the United States. We are open Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:30AM and 6:00PM, United States Eastern.

SSRN's eLIBRARY
SSRN's searchable electronic library contains abstracts, full bibliographic data, and author contact information for more than 783,300 papers, more than 364,200 authors, and full text for more than 663,100 papers. The eLibrary can be accessed at 
SSRN's eLIBRARYSSRN's searchable electronic library contains abstracts, full bibliographic data, and author contact information for more than 783,300 papers, more than 364,200 authors, and full text for more than 663,100 papers. The eLibrary can be accessed at http://papers.ssrn.com.

SSRN supports open access by allowing authors to upload papers to the eLibrary for free through the SSRN User HeadQuarters at 
SSRN supports open access by allowing authors to upload papers to the eLibrary for free through the SSRN User HeadQuarters at http://hq.ssrn.com, and by providing free downloading of those papers.

Downloads from the SSRN eLibrary in the past 12 months total more than 13 million, with more than 122.5 million downloads since inception.

SSRN's PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
Searching on an individual's name in the author field on our search page at 
Downloads from the SSRN eLibrary in the past 12 months total more than 13 million, with more than 122.5 million downloads since inception.
SSRN's PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORYSearching on an individual's name in the author field on our search page at http://ssrn.com/search provides the best single professional directory of scholars in the social sciences and humanities. Complete contact information for authors, including email, postal, telephone, and fax information, is available there.

SSRN's MISSION
SSRN's objective is to provide rapid, worldwide distribution of research to authors and their readers and to facilitate communication among them at the lowest possible cost. In pursuit of this objective, we allow authors to upload papers without charge. And, any paper an author uploads to SSRN is downloadable for free, worldwide.

LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP NETWORK
The Legal Scholarship Network (LSN) distributes other eJournals. You can subscribe to these eJournals through the SSRN User HeadQuarters at 
SSRN's MISSIONSSRN's objective is to provide rapid, worldwide distribution of research to authors and their readers and to facilitate communication among them at the lowest possible cost. In pursuit of this objective, we allow authors to upload papers without charge. And, any paper an author uploads to SSRN is downloadable for free, worldwide.
LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP NETWORKThe Legal Scholarship Network (LSN) distributes other eJournals. You can subscribe to these eJournals through the SSRN User HeadQuarters at http://hq.ssrn.com.

Sincerely,

Bernard Black and Ronald J. Gilson
Directors
Legal Scholarship Network 


Sincerely,
Bernard Black and Ronald J. GilsonDirectorsLegal Scholarship Network 
The first published papers can be found on SSRN.
Categories: Comparative Law News

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Workshop “Food and Economy” (Economy and Society of the Pre-Industrial Low Countries in a Comparative perspective) (N.W. Posthumus Institute – VUB-FOST; Brussels), DEADLINE 15 MARCH 2018



(Source: Radboud Universiteit)
We received notice of the following Call for Abstracts:
Food history can be approached from many angles. One of them is a cultural-historical perspective, focusing on traditions and attitudes in the production and consumption of food. Food production, processing and distribution also play a crucial role in the economy, creating formal and informal employment for a considerable part of the population. In their Manifesto for the Foundational Economy (2013), a group of scholars pleaded for a ‘gestalt flip’ in economic policy by paying more attention to the foundational economy. That is “the sector of the economy that provides goods and services taken for granted by all members of the population and that is therefore territorially distributed”. Today, the foundational economy employs 40% of the workforce. The food sector is a good example of a foundational economy with a diversified supply and distribution chain. The sector is of crucial importance in offering economic security and social sustainability but has an indirect impact on other sectors of production (tableware, storage facilities, …) as well. 
In this workshop, we want to reflect on the importance of the foundational economy for economic growth and social wellbeing by focusing on “food”. We therefore welcome papers that address “food” from an economic or social historical perspective, or combine cultural with social or economic aspects of food production and distribution in the past, and that deal with the pre-industrial Low Countries in itself or in a comparative perspective. Possible topics are: food production, survival strategies, changes in landholding and landownership, rural-urban relations, transport, food processing, food markets, shops, peddling, food storage and preservation, food regulations, government intervention in food distribution, and so on. 
The workshop will be organized by the network “Economy and Society of the Pre-Industrial Low Countries in a Comparative Perspective” of the N.W. Posthumus Institute in co-operation with VUB-FOST (Social and Cultural Food Studies), and will take place in Brussels on Friday 22 June 2018. We will provide a keynote on food and the foundational economy (tbc) and will conclude with a round table, setting a research agenda on food and economy. 
Abstracts can be sent to Heidi.deneweth@vub.bebefore 15 March 2018. Participants will be notified before 1 April and will receive all practical information by then. 
Please note that transport and accommodation are not covered. 
Heidi Deneweth (VUB)Jessica Dijkman (UU) 

Categories: Comparative Law News

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