THE PROMISE OF BETTER HEALTH

Is there a genetic roadblock for cancer? How do we start a global health revolution?

Outstanding health sciences research and teaching date back to the beginning of McGill. Today our professors and researchers are at the forefront of targeting deadly diseases like cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and obesity. They are tackling global health challenges through international partnerships – from addressing inequities in resources and access to health care, to conducting research into infectious disease. They are exploring new frontiers in oral health and pain management, and investigating what contributes to well-being across the lifespan. And they are making discoveries in human genetics that weren’t possible even a few years ago – discoveries that will transform health and human wellness.

HOW CAN WE GET AHEAD OF GLOBAL HEALTH THREATS?

Madhukar Pai is Director of McGill Global Health Programs, Associate Director of the McGill International Tuberculosis Centre, and a Canada Research Chair in Translational Epidemiology & Global Health. Dr. Pai spoke with us about infectious diseases, systems of healthcare delivery, and how Canada and McGill are helping to tackle three major global health challenges.

IS CANNABIS THE KEY TO PAIN MANAGEMENT?

Mark Ware is the Director of Clinical Research at the Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit of the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC). In addition to his associate professor roles in the Departments of Family Medicine and Anesthesia at McGill, he serves as vice-chair on the federal Task Force on Cannabis Legalization and Regulation.

CONVERTING CELLS TO BURN FAT, NOT STORE IT

Researchers have uncovered a new molecular pathway for stimulating the body to burn fat – a discovery that could help fight obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

PAIN CENTRE PRODUCES GAINS

McGill is recognized as an international hub for pain research, and the Alan Edwards Centre for Research on Pain is leading the way in exploring conditions that affect one in five Canadians and ultimately cost the health care system more than cancer, heart disease and diabetes combined.

PUTTING PATIENTS FIRST

The goal is to make the Rossy Cancer Network a world-class comprehensive cancer care centre. Network members are collaborating on everything from research into enhancing recovery programs, to pilot programs that reduce waiting times, and life-after-cancer treatment and education.