Tim Moore

Soils and the Environment

Soil – environment relationships and the effect of human activities and climate and global change.

Professor in the Department of Geography

Office: Burnside Hall 626
Phone: 514-398-4961
Fax: 514-398-7437
Personal website
tim.moore [at] mcgill.ca (E-Mail)


Academic background

  • PhD Soil Science, University of Aberdeen (1971)

Research interests

My interests lie in the relationships between soil and the environment, particularly the regulation of fluxes of gases, nutrients and elements between the soil and the atmosphere, the biosphere and the hydrosphere and the effect of human activities and climate and global change.  Study sites include wetlands and forested soils, in Canada, the U.S., Panama and New Zealand. My work attempts to integrate aspects of atmospheric chemistry, plant ecology, hydrology, microbiology and soil science in a search to understand biogeochemical patterns in the landscape.


Current projects

  • The biogeochemistry of peatlands, through the examination of fluxes of the greenhouse gases CO2, CH4 and N2O, nutrient cycling and stoichiometry and plant-soil interactions.
  • Detection of graves using biogeochemistry.

Some recent publications

Coomes, O.T., T.R. Moore and S. Breau 2017. The price of journals in geography. Professional Geographer 69: 251-262. doi: 10.1080/00330124.2016.1229624.

T.R. Moore and O.T. Coomes 2016. Publishing journal articles in Canadian geography. The Canadian Geographer 60: 23-31 doi: 10.1111/cag.12252.

Wang, M., T.R. Moore, J. Talbot and J.L. Riley 2015. The stoichiometry of carbon and nutrients in peat formation. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 29: 113–121  doi: 10.1002/2014GB005000.

Dalva, M., T.R. Moore, M. Kalacska, G. Leblanc and A. Costopoulos 2015. Nitrous oxide, methane and carbon dioxide dynamics from experimental pig graves. Forensic Science International 247: 41-47 doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2014.12.002.

Moore, T.R., A. De Young, J. Bubier, E. Humphreys, P. Lafleur and N.T. Roulet 2011. A multi-year record of methane flux at the Mer Bleue bog, southern Canada. Ecosystems 14: 646-657.