Catherine Ferland-Legault

Catherine Ferland-Legault

Title:

Assistant Professor, Department of Anesthesia, McGill University

Research Interests:

Thousands of children undergo surgery across Canada each year. Postoperative pain has immediate consequences leading to postoperative morbidity. Moreover, between 10 to 20 % of children undergoing surgery will develop chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP), making this problem the most common surgical complication. Preventing CPSP becomes highly relevant as it may predispose children to experience recurrent pain during adulthood. The clinical challenge rests in the ability to determine which patient will be at risk of having CPSP and which intervention will best fit for a specific patient. In this context, it is of high relevance to provide clinicians a tool to identify patients at risk of having CPSP, as well as a feasible explanation for the rational of personalized treatment.

Our research investigates the pain processing and underlying mechanisms leading to CPSP. We evaluate the clinical relevance of a sensory testing combined with a molecular analysis over the perioperative period to identify patients at higher risks of developing chronic pain. The hypothesis is that by identifying preoperatively sensory and physiological differences in patient pain profiles, we will allow for personalized postoperative therapeutic approaches to improve patient pain management and decrease the risk of CPSP.

The proposed research aims to guide the development of clinical strategies for the management of postoperative pain focused on sound mechanistic based therapeutic medications decreasing the risk of chronic pain. With multidisciplinary interests in orthopaedics, neurophysiology and anaesthesia, our research program integrates basic, translational and clinical initiatives for the prevention of CPSP to achieve transformative changes in the care of this challenging disorder.

Contact:

catherine.ferland [at] mcgill.ca (Email)

Tel: 514-842-4464, ext. 7177

Recent Publications:

Publications indexed to PubMed