Courses

Epidemiology | Public Health

IMPORTANT NOTES:

  • Instructions for McGill student from outside of our department who would like to register for one of our courses.

    No special permission is required for the following courses: PPHS 501, PPHS 511.

    EPIB 507 is open to graduate students in the Faculty of Medicine though space is limited. EPIB 521 is open to all students who have taken EPIB 507. Students requesting an exemption for EPIB 507 must provide a syllabus for a course they have successfully completed that is similar in content to EPIB 507 in order to be granted permission to register in EPIB 521.

    For all other courses, you should write the course instructor to request permission to register. Please forward their reply to graduate.eboh [at] mcgill.ca and include your McGill ID number in your email. Please be sure to use your McGill email address when you contact us.

  • Course numbers EPIB 591, 641, 643, 668, 670, 672, 675, 676, 677, 678, 679 belong to a group of Special Topics course numbers, and can be used only once. If you have used any of these numbers in a previous course, please contact the Student Affairs Office.

Fall 2020

Timetable

EPIB 507 Biostatistics for Health Sciences

Instructor TBA

Basic principles of statistical inference applicable to clinical, epidemiologic, and other health research. Topics include: methods of describing data, statistical inference for means, statistical inference for proportions, non-parametric statistics, correlation and introduction to linear regression.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor

Restriction(s): Restricted to students registered in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry, Human Nutrition, Medical Residents, and Clinical Fellows.

NOTES: Medical Residents & Clinical Fellows can register for this course only during the Summer term.

Course not opened to students registered in the Epidemiology and Biostatistics programs.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 601 Fundamentals of Epidemiology

Section 001 - alissa.koski [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Koski)

Section 002 - Instructor TBA

This course aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to modern epidemiologic concepts and methods. It is designed for graduate students in the MSc and PhD degree programs of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. This course provides, at the graduate level, fundamental concepts, principles, and methods of epidemiologic research and study design. Topics include definitions, measures of disease frequency and effect, epidemiologic study designs, biases and confounding. In addition to lectures, students will participate in a practicum/laboratory session where they will engage in case studies, group discussions, journal article appraisals, and work on problem sets, quizzes, and lab exercises. The companion courses, 602 and 603, will cover other introductory topics in epidemiology and biostatistics.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in PPHS 602 for students in Epidemiology and Public Health programs.
Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 606.
Section 001 restricted to students in the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health programs.
Section 002 not opened to students in the Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health programs.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 607 Inferential Statistics

sahir.bhatnagar [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Bhatnagar)

The aim of this course is to provide students with basic principles of statistical inference applicable to clinical and epidemiologic research so that they can: i) understand how statistical methods are used by others; (ii) apply statistical methods in their own research; (iii) use the methods learned in this course as a foundation for more advanced biostatistics courses. Topics include sampling, methods of describing data, introduction to probability, introduction to statistical inference, correlation and an introduction to regression.

Prerequisites: At least one course which includes differential and integral calculus.
Restricted to students in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 613 Introduction to Statistical Software

Instructor TBA

Introduction to statistical software and fundamentals of data management – data entering, manipulating data and elementary statistical analysis in Epidemiology using software such as STATA and R.

Prerequisite: Enrolment in Epidemiology program.

Academic Credit: 1

EPIB 627 Analysis of Correlated Data

erica.moodie [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. E. Moodie)

The course will provide a basic introduction to methods for analysis of correlated, or dependent, data. These data arise when observations are not gathered independently; examples are longitudinal data, household data, cluster samples, etc. basic descriptive methods and introduce regression methods for both continuous and discrete outcomes will be examined

Prerequisites: EPIB 603, EPIB 621.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 628 Measurement in Epidemiology

norbert.schmitz [at] douglas.mcgill.ca (Dr. N. Schmitz)

This course will focus on methodological issues related to measures of health status, determinants of health status, and other relevant covariates encountered in clinical and epidemiologic research. Topics to be covered include instrument development, assessment of reliability and validity, item response theory, and latent variable-based measurement models.

Prerequisites: EPIB 603 and EPIB 621 or permission of instructor.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 629 Knowledge Synthesis

kristian.filion [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. K. Filion)

Knowledge synthesis is critical for evidence-based clinical and public health practice. Systematic reviews are now considered an essential component of guideline and policy development. The widespread and growing application of systematic reviews to synthesize evidence on key research and clinical questions makes it useful for health professionals and graduate students to be able to understand and critique this research design, and to actually conduct such reviews. This course will provide a detailed description of the systematic review process, discuss the strengths and limitations of the method, and provide step-by-step guidance on how to actually perform a systematic review and meta-analysis. In fact, all enrolled students will be required to complete a systematic review (on a topic of their choice) during the course of the semester. The goal would be to produce a draft manuscript that can be submitted to peer-reviewed journals.

Specific topics to be covered include: formulation of the review question, searching of literature, quality assessment of studies, data extraction, meta-analytic methods, and report writing. The course will also cover statistical issues such as selection of statistical models for meta-analysis, practical examples of fixed and random effects models as well as examples of methods to evaluate heterogeneity and publication bias; graphical and tabular templates for the presentation of meta-analysis data. STATA software package will be extensively used, along with computer lab tutorials on how to effectively use tools such as PubMed, Embase and EndNote for conducting reviews. This course will feature invited speakers who will provide overviews of special topics such as network meta-analyses, diagnostic meta-analyses, individual patient-data meta-analyses, and Bayesian meta-analyses.

Academic credits: 3

Prerequisites: Introductory level training in epidemiology (e.g. EPIB601) and biostatistics (e.g. EPIB607).

Students are required to contact the instructor in order to obtain permission to register.

EPIB 632 - Mental Disorders: Population Perspectives and Methods

rebecca.fuhrer [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. R. Fuhrer) | srividya.iyer [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Iyer)

This seminar will address several key issues and concepts integral to the epidemiological study of mental disorders. A review of the origins of the field and critical review of classical studies, as well as recent major studies will lay the foundations of the field and where it is now. The burden of mental disorders nationally and globally will be discussed, identification of psychopathology in community versus clinical settings, and the methodological challenges involved will be reviewed. Research designs including approaches to address etiology, health services delivery, prevention, role functioning, and policy will be considered as well.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 603 or permission of the instructor.

Minimum 5 students, Maximum 10 students

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 635 - Design of Randomized Clinical Trials

shirin.golchi [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Golchi)

This course provides an introduction to design of Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT) with an emphasis on statistical considerations. Topics include randomization techniques, sample size estimation, assessment of design operating characteristics, trial simulation and Bayesian methods for randomized clinical trials. A number of specific designs including Cluster Randomized Trials and Bayesian Adaptive Designs will be covered in more detail.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 621 or permission of the instructor.

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 641 - Perinatal Epidemiology (Directed Reading Course) - Not offered in 2020-2021
(Special Topics Course)

seungmi.yang [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Yang)

This course will address core concepts in perinatal epidemiologic research, including intrauterine growth, preterm birth, fetal and infant deaths, and maternal morbidity and mortality. The course will discuss an overview of substantive knowledge and methodological challenges related to the selected topics. This course aims students to learn basic concepts and skills to critically evaluate the literature in the field from their study design to measurement issues and analytical problems. Students are expected to know some of the fundamental epidemiologic concepts and principles such as bias and confounding.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor.

Academic Credit: 1

EPIB 648 Methods in Social Epidemiology - Not offeredin in 2020-2021

seungmi.yang [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Yang)

Methods for conducting studies in social epidemiology and population health will be covered. Topics will include causal inference; measurement and concepts of social exposures; methods for study design and analysis. Techniques for descriptive and etiologic investigations of socioeconomic position, gender, race and ethnicity, geography, and social policies will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 603 and EPIB 621, or permission of the instructors.

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 684 Principles of Environmental Health Sciences 1

Dr. B.F. Hales | Dr. J. Chevrier et All

Topics in environmental health sciences: principles of exposure assessment and of toxicology

Restrictions: Open to graduate students pursuing a career in Environmental Health Sciences or with permission of the course instructors. Not open to students who have taken or are taking EXMD 670 or NRSC 670 or PHAR 670.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 702 Ph.D. Proposal - Fall & Winter

arijit.nandi [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Nandi) | michal.abrahamowicz [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Abrahamowicz)

The course will prepare students for their PhD thesis research protocol. Under the active tutelage of their PhD thesis supervisor and other thesis committee members, students are expected to develop an important research question that will be addressed by epidemiologic and biostatistical methods of the highest scientific quality. In doing so, they should acquire essential skills for writing and defending research proposals and grant applications, including the importance of the research question(s), formulation of research objectives to answer those questions, the design(s) proposed to achieve the objectives, statistical analytic strategies, and the strengths and limitations of the proposed research.  The relative emphasis of the substantive, design, and analytic compoonents will of course be adapted according the the student's PhD curriculum stream: epidemiology or biostatistics. The student should make his or her original contribution to the research.

The course runs over the fall and winter terms and meets every week that a presentation is scheduled. It will not be offered during the summer months.  Students enrolled in a given academic year are expected to attend all protocol defenses by their fellow students in both semesters, regardless of the timing of their own defense.  Absences for a specific session should be approved by the course instructors. Early in the fall semester, enrolled students will meet with the course instructors to clarify and discuss the course's goals, expectations, and procedures.

Course Outline [pdf]

EPIB 703 Principles in Study Design

michael.kramer [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Kramer) | robyn.tamblyn [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. R. Tamblyn)

This course will provide an overview of the concepts and principles underlying epidemiologic study design. Focus will be on the importance of appropriately formulating the research question, identifying the target population, defining the relevant entities, and on how these factors affect the validity of study findings. Examples from the published literature will be extensively used to illustrate the crucial points and will be discussed in class.

Students taking the course are expected to know the basic epidemiologic concepts, including measures of disease status and occurrence, measures of association, bias and confounding. At the end of the course, students should have improved the critical skills required when reading an epidemiologic paper or planning a study.

Restriction(s): Registration in the Ph.D. Epidemiology program, or Permission of the Instructor.

Academic Credit: 2

EPIB 704 Doctoral Level Epidemiologic Methods 1

jay.kaufman [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. J. Kaufman)

Estimation of epidemiologic effect measures and their confidence intervals in a variety of different study designs. Emphasis on analysis of sample data sets using regression models, graphical and tabular presentation of results, causal interpretation of effect estimates, writing reports for scientific publications, and sensitivity analyses for violated assumptions.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 603 and EPIB 621 or equivalent
Restriction(s): Open to Ph.D. students in Epidemiology or Biostatistics programs only. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 604.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 706 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology - Section reserved for Fall 2019 Ph.D. Epidemiology cohort

Dr. S. Harper

This course aims to provide an opportunity to students who have completed the Epidemiology course series in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, to optimize their training in ways that will be helpful to their thesis research and to the development of their career as epidemiologists. The content of this interactive course and the delivery of the material is primarily determined by students based on the knowledge gaps that they identify. The course will allow students to expand their methodological tool box, explore controversies in epidemiology, and gain experience synthesizing and communicating complex concepts to an informed audience.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Comprehensive Exam

Restriction(s): Enrolment in PhD Epidemiology or Permission of Instructor. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 609.

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 707 Research Design in Health Sciences

christina.wolfson [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Wolfson) | nicole.basta [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. N. Basta)

Lectures and discussions and student oral and written presentations with the aim of providing guidance and experience in the development of objectives, background and methods for both the formulation of, and the constructive peer criticism of, research protocols in the health sciences.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 701

Restriction(s): Registration in the PhD program in Epidemiology. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 623.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 710 Advanced Methods: Causal Inference - Not offered in 2020-2021

robert.platt [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. R. Platt)

Causal inference using potential outcomes has become a standard part of the toolkit for epidemiologic researchers. In this course students will review foundational material on potential outcomes, and then understand and implement advanced methods. The class will emphasize both conceptual understanding and implementation, including analyses of complex datasets. Time-fixed and time-varying exposures will be considered. Methods studied will vary but will include marginal structural models, structural nested models, and targeted maximum likelihood.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 705, or equivalent, or permission of instructor

Restriction(s): Restricted to Ph.D. students in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 610.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 511 Fundamentals of Global Health

madhukar.pai [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Pai)

This exciting and interactive 500-level course aims to give students the opportunity to broaden their understanding and knowledge of global health issues, including global burden of diseases, determinants of health, epidemiological transition and drivers of such transition, challenges in healthcare delivery in resource-limited settings, innovations in global health technologies and delivery models, and the variety of agencies and actors engaged in addressing global health challenges.

Major topics:

  1. Introduction to global health, definitions, key concepts, global health governance.
  2. Global burden of disease, measurement, and epidemiologic transition
  3. Social determinants of health and impact of globalization
  4. Infectious and tropical diseases
  5. Non-communicable diseases
  6. Maternal, newborn and child health
  7. Environmental health and climate change
  8. Global mental health
  9. Global health nutrition
  10. Trauma and injury prevention
  11. Immigrant and Aboriginal health
  12. Global health delivery challenges
  13. Global health technologies
  14. Global health ethics
  15. Case studies in global health innovations

Prerequisite: None.

Academic Credits: 3

Course Syllabus

PPHS 525 Health Care Systems in Comparative Perspective

Instructor TBA

Comparative perspective to illustrate processes involved in the development and evolution of health care systems around the world. Countries examined will represent different welfare state regimes, health care system typologies, levels of development and wealth.

Note: This course is cross-listed in Sociology.
Restriction: Not open to students who are taking or have taken EPIB 525 or SOCI 525.

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 528 Economic Evaluation of Health Programmes

eric.latimer [at] douglas.mcgill.ca (Dr. E. Latimer)

Concepts and methods used to carry out economic evaluations of health programmes and interventions, including public health interventions, pharmaceuticals, and other health care interventions. Includes topics such as calculation of unit costs, measurement of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) and assessment of uncertainty in cost-effectiveness analysis.

Note: This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates from all departments, with the permission of the instructor. No prior background in economics is required.

Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 528.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 529 Global Environmental Health and Burden of Disease

scottandrew.weichenthal [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Weichenthal)

This course will introduce students to grand challenges in global health related to environmental and occupational risks, and the multi-disciplinary methods used to identify, control, and prevent them. We will focus on environmental issues, such as air pollution, pesticides, toxic metals, unsafe water and sanitation, analyze their impacts on the global burden of disease, including asthma, malaria, cardiovascular disease, and child development; review the state of the science emerging threats such as the impacts of climate change and urbanization on shifting disease patterns; and identify key interventions and policies to address these pressing global health topics in both industrialized and developing countries. Students will develop knowledge and skills in core disciplines of environmental health (toxicology, exposure science, environmental epidemiology) and approaches to environmental risk recognition, control and prevention in a global context.

Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 529.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 602 Foundations of Population Health

jill.baumgartner [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. J. Baumgartner)

PPHS602 is a companion course to EPIB 601. The course is intended for graduate students in the epidemiology degree programs and is required for MSc students in Epidemiology as well as MSc students in Public Health. The course focuses on three main topics: descriptive epidemiology, sampling methods and measurement. Specific topics will include an introduction to population-based studies, life table and basic survival analysis, probability and non-probability-based sampling, sampling error, sample size estimation, principles of exposure measurement, measurement error, validity, reliability, questionnaire design and other concepts and methods.

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EPIB 601 and 607.
Restricted to students in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health. Not open to students of have taken EPIB 602.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 615 Introduction to Infectious Disease Epidemiology

joanna-trees.merckx [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. J. Merckx)

Introduction to the field of infectious disease epidemiology taught from a public health perspective. Topics include analytic methods, study design, outbreak investigations, surveillance, vaccine development and evaluations, screening, modeling, and infectious causes of cancer or chronic diseases.

Prerequisite: EPIB 601 or Permission of Instructor.

Note: An undergraduate level biology course is highly recommended.

Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 615.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 624 Public Health Ethics and Policy

nicholas.king [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. N. King)

This graduate course addresses the ethical evaluation of population approaches to health and public health theory and practice. Students will discuss ethical dilemmas that arise in specific case studies in public health. Topics include (but will not be limited to): determinants of health, health inequalities, and social justice; genetics and racial categorization in public health; DALYs and the appropriate definition of health; biodefense and the 'militarization' of public health; surveillance and privacy; pandemic preparedness and distribution of scarce resources during an epidemic; environmental health and cost-benefit analysis; and isolation, quarantine and compliance. Students from any disciplinary background are welcome; there are no prerequisites. Coursework includes reading scholarly literature; formal presentation and debate; case analysis; and written work. Course materials draw on a wide range of disciplines, including epidemiology, medicine, history, sociology, and anthropology.

Restriction: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 624.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 631 MScPH Forum 2 - Fall & Winter

christine.stich [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Stich) | catherine.hankins [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Hankins)

The Forum is a seminar and discussion series which provides an opportunity for students to be introduced to experts in public health, and to reflect upon and share their practicum experience. Students will also have practical learning activities and will share their practicum experiences with their fellow students through their oral presentations.

Restriction: Open to students registered in the M.Sc. in Public Health.

Academic Credits: 4

Winter 2021

Timetable

EPIB 521 Regression Analysis for Health Sciences

Instructor TBA

The aim of this course is to provide students with basic principles of regression analyses applicable to the health sciences so that they can understand and use appropriate statistical regression techniques for continuous and discrete data. The course will cover: Linear regression: Regression for two or more explanatory variables, Polynomial regression, Dummy variables, Inference for regression parameters, Confounding and collinearity, Effect modification, Model-checking, Model selection, Prediction. Logistic and Poisson regression: Logistic regression for one or more variables, Interpreting odds ratios, Inference for logistic and Poisson regression parameters, Confounding and interactions in logistic regression, Model selection, Prediction. A very brief overview of survival analysis.

Prerequisite: EPIB 507, or graduate.eboh [at] mcgill.ca (subject: Permission%20to%20register%20for%20EPIB%20521) (permission of department).

Restriction(s): Course not open to students registered in the Epidemiology, Biostatistics or Public Health programs. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 591 when topic was “Regression Analysis for Health Sciences".

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 591 Biopsychosocial model in health and disease
(Special Topics Course)

xiangfei.meng [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. X. Meng)

The original biopsychosocial (BPS) model proposed by Engel was an interdisciplinary and multifaced model to understand the interrelations among the biological, physiological, and social influences on health and disease. A continuum of biopsychosocial factors, ranging from biological to psychological to societal, dynamically affect a population’s health. Biological factors (e.g. genetic background), psychological factors (e.g. coping strategies), and sociological factors (e.g. social support) shape health directly or indirectly. The general objective of this 3-credit course embraces an interdisciplinary approach to address the psychological, mental, emotional, and social factors that influence health and well-being across the lifespan.

Current research reports that diseases such as HIV/AIDs, tuberculosis, cancer, diabetes, depression are a growing threat to the public health and quality of life of individuals across the globe. Considering that nearly all these diseases are related to the lifestyle of an individual, prevention and intervention should be devised to address biological, psychological, emotional, and social factors. Examines factors along the biopsychosocial continuum that influence such behavior. Highlights key determinants for achieving behavior change to improve health outcomes, such as feasibility, self-efficacy, and social support. And introduces common types of behavior change interventions crafted for biological factors.

Course Syllabus

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 603 Intermediate Epidemiology

scottandrew.weichenthal [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Weichenthal)

This course presents concepts and methods for epidemiology at the intermediate level. It is designed for students interested in conducting epidemiologic research autonomously. The course covers: concepts of causation, measures of disease occurrence and effect, study designs, biases in epidemiologic research, and interaction. Critical assessment of the literature is emphasized.

Prerequisites: EPIB 601, EPIB 602 and EPIB 607.
Restricted to students in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 605 Critical Appraisal in Epidemiology

maida.sewitch [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Sewitch)

This course provides the opportunity to develop skills to critically evaluate evidence presented in the biomedical and health sciences literature, based on the concepts acquired in the epidemiology introductory courses.

Prerequisites: EPIB 601 and EPIB 607.
Restricted to students in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health.

Academic Credit: 1

EPIB 621 Data Analysis in Health Sciences

shirin.golchi [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Golchi)

Univariate and multivariate statistical techniques for continuous categorical data. Topics include generalized linear models, multiple linear and logistic regression and model selection. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches will be presented.

Prerequisites: EPIB 601, and EPIB 607 or permission of instructor.
Restricted to students in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 625 Ethics of Human Research

jonathan.kimmelman [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. J. Kimmelman)

Some of the earliest and foundational debates in bioethics grew out of revelations about abuses in human experimentation. This class provides an introduction to the ethics of conducting research involving human beings. Though there is a particular focus on clinical trials, the course also surveys ethical issues in public health research, experimental psychology, and animal experimentation. Areas to be covered include the following: (1) scandals involving research with humans; (2) ethical and regulatory guidelines and structures; (3) ethical theory and principles of human research ethics; (4) empirical literature on ethical practice. The course is additionally intended to help students develop skills needed to perform academic research in biomedical ethics.

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 637 Advanced Modeling of Survival and Other Multivariable Data

michal.abrahamowicz [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Abrahamowicz)

Advanced applied biostatistics course dealing with flexible modeling of non-linear effects of continuous covariates in multivariable analyses, and survival data, including e.g. time-varying covariates and time-dependent or cumulative effects. Focus on the concepts, limitations and advantages of specific methods, and interpretation of their results. Students will get hands-on experience in the implementation of selected methods by applying them to their own multivariable data, in individual survival analysis projects.

Prerequisites: EPIB 621, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Academic Credits: Epidemiology 3

EPIB 638 Mathematical Modeling of Infectious Diseases

mathieu.maheu-giroux [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Maheu-Giroux)

Mathematical models of infectious diseases–computer simulations of epidemics–enable detailed analyses and understanding of factors affecting the distribution of infections/diseases in populations and now play a key role in policy making. Covered topics include: short-term dynamics of infections (R0), compartmental models,stochastic models (including agent-based), contact patterns and heterogeneity, and Bayesian model calibration. The learning objectives are: 1) recognize research questions that can be addressed using modeling; 2) develop, parameterize, calibrate, and analyze simple infectious disease models in R; and 3) critically appraise scientific modeling papers.

Prerequisites: EPIB 621, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Academic Credits: Epidemiology 3

EPIB 639 Pharmacoepidemiologic Methods

laurent.azoulay [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. L. Azoulay)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an in-depth review of the methods and principles of pharmacoepidemiology. Topics covered include themes related to the potential data sources, appropriate exposure definitions, the use of active drug comparators, latency and the application of lag periods, reverse causality, detection bias, methodological considerations in the assessment of acute versus chronic outcomes, new-user designs, healthy-user effects, and non-traditional study designs (e.g., within-user designs). In addition, the role of confounding and methods used to minimize its effects, such as the use of propensity scores, instrumental variables, and marginal structural models will be discussed.

Prerequisites: EPIB 603, EPIB 621, or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 675 Health Care Systems Analysis Using Administrative Data
(Special Topics Course)

Instructor TBA

This course provides a theoretical and practical foundation for health care systems research and evaluation. The theory covers how we think about the performance of health care systems and how the relevant concepts of performance (e.g. access, appropriateness, and quality) are measured. The practical component provides students with the opportunity to operationalize measures of performance using administrative data and SAS.

The course does not focus on health care system policies or health research study design. Experience with SAS is not a prerequisite.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructor

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 676 Bayesian Analysis in the Health Sciences
(Special Topics Course)

alexandra.schmidt [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Schmidt)

The goal of this course is to provide researchers with an introduction to practical Bayesian methods. Topics will include Bayesian philosophy, simple univariate models, linear and logistic regression and hierarchical models. Numerical techniques including Monte Carlo integration, sampling importance resampling (SIR), the Gibbs sampler and the Metropolis-Hastings algorithms will be covered, including programming in R, JAGS, NIMBLE, and Stan.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructors.

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 679 Genetic Epidemiology
(Special Topics Course)

audrey.grant [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Grant)

This course will provide students with an overview of the state of the art in genetic and genomic epidemiology with a focus on important or key concepts, study design and interpretation aspects that are specific to these fields. A condensed treatment of the molecular basis of human genetics and classic approaches including family- and population- based studies will be followed by an in-depth exploration of genomewide association studies, with a view to the critical evaluation of such studies. The use of genetic data and multiple disease phenotypes and quantitative traits integrated with other sources of genomic data will be presented in the context of big data biobank cohorts. Considerations when using genetic data for disease outcome prediction and investigation of causal pathways will be presented. References will be made to the larger context of the explosion of genetic data in the public sphere, including policy and ethics implications.

Prerequisite(s): Permission of the instructors.

Academic Credit: 3

EPIB 681 Global Health: Epidemiological Research

theresa.gyorkos [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. T. Gyorkos)

This course addresses the major global health challenges of today bringing into the discussion the role of research in addressing the challenges. Topics will include global burden of diseases, social determinants of health, global health ethics and neglected tropical diseases, among others. Specific examples from research on HIV, TB, other tropical diseases, nutrition, vaccine-preventable diseases and burden of disease will be highlighted. The ethics topic also covers code of conduct issues while carrying out global health research projects. The course will also highlight the challenges faced by graduate students in carrying out field work in a developing country. The teaching format includes lectures (some with visiting speakers), class discussions, case studies and student presentations. Research from developing countries and epidemiological research methods will be highlighted.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Please note this course has a minimum requirement of 5 registrations. It will be cancelled if minimum is not met.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 685 Principles of Environmental Health Sciences 2

mark.goldberg [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. M. Goldberg)

Topics in environmental health sciences: principles of exposure assessment and of toxicology

Restrictions: Open to graduate students in the Environmental Health Sciences or permission of the course instructors. Not open to students who have taken or are taking EXMD 671 or NRSC 671 or PHAR 671.

Academic Credits: 3

EPIB 705 Doctoral Level Epidemiologic Methods 2

jonathan.chevrier [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. J. Chevrier) | claire.infante-rivard [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Infante-Rivard)

The course has a conceptual and analytical causal inference perspective. The nature of specific study biases resulting in non-causal components in the observed association between exposure and outcome are discussed, including endogenous selection bias, measured and unmeasured confounding, and measurement error. Methods to recover the causal effect with such biases are presented. Causal mediation analysis is discussed. Models for survival analysis are discussed as well as the problem of- and some solutions to missing data. A brief overview of genetic epidemiology principles is covered.

Prerequisite(s): EPIB 704.

Restriction(s): Open to Ph.D. students in Epidemiology or Biostatistics programs only, or permission of the instructor. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 608.

Academic Credits: 4

EPIB 706 Doctoral Seminar in Epidemiology - Section reserved for Fall 2020 Ph.D. Epidemiology cohort

Dr. S. Harper

This course aims to provide an opportunity to students who have completed the Epidemiology course series in the Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, to optimize their training in ways that will be helpful to their thesis research and to the development of their career as epidemiologists. The content of this interactive course and the delivery of the material is primarily determined by students based on the knowledge gaps that they identify. The course will allow students to expand their methodological tool box, explore controversies in epidemiology, and gain experience synthesizing and communicating complex concepts to an informed audience.

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of Comprehensive Exam

Restriction(s): Enrolment in PhD Epidemiology or Permission of Instructor. Not open to students who have taken EPIB 609.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 501 Population Health and Epidemiology

Instructor TBA

This course presents concepts and methods of epidemiology at the introductory level. The use of epidemiologic methods for population and public health research and practice will be illustrated. A review of selected population health questions such as the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the cardiovascular disease epidemic, cigarette smoking, or screening for disease will be presented.

Restrictions: Course not open to students enrolled in Epidemiology or Public Health Programs, or who have taken EPIB 501.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 527 Economics for Health Services Research and Policy

erin.strumpf [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. E. Strumpf)

Key health policy topics in developed economies using analytic frameworks and tools from economics. Major topics include health insurance, health care financing, and the roles of individuals and public and private institutions in the health care system.

NOTE: This course is open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates from all departments, with the permission of the instructor. A background in introductory economics is useful, though not required.

Restriction: Not open to students who have take EPIB 527.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 612 Principles of Public Health Practice

Instructor TBA

Epidemiology & Biostatistics: Principles and methods in public health practice. Topics will include investigation in public health, public health intervention, program evaluation, public health and the health care system, society and public health.

Prequisites: EPIB 601, PPHS 602, and EPIB 607 or permission of instructor

Restriction: Open only to students in the MSc and PhD programs in Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health. Open to students in other disciplines with permission of instructor. Not open to students who have take EPIB 612.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 613 The Practice of Global Health

charles.larson [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Larson)

Introduction to core competencies in the practice of global health, including historical, colonial roots of global health, project planning and implementation, equitable and ethical conduct, building partnerships, working within interdisciplinary teams, effective communication and personal-social skills.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 614 Knowledge Translation and Public Health Leadership

catherine.hankins [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Hankins)

An examination of knowledge translation in public health, including synthesis, dissemination, exchange, and ethically-sound application of knowledge to policy and programming. Overview of knowledge translation processes for effective evidence-informed public health leadership.

Prerequisite: PPHS 612 or permission of instructor

Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken EPIB 678 when topic was ‘Knowledge Translation, Communications, and Evidence-Informed Public Health Leadership’.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 616 Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance

david.buckeridge [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. D. Buckeridge) | achiolero [at] gmail.com (Dr. A. Chiolero)

Public health (PH) surveillance is the ongoing systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data, closely integrated with the timely dissemination of these data to those responsible for preventing and controlling disease and injury. Students who complete the course successfully will be able:

  1. to define PH surveillance and its purposes,
  2. to describe the characteristics of a surveillance system and the data sources commonly used for surveillance activities,
  3. to appraise the utility of health indicators for PH surveillance, and
  4. to apply basic methods for the analysis of surveillance data and interpret the results.

The course will consist of one week of intensive introductory classes on the principles of PH surveillance (9 hours), a series of weekly laboratory sessions to acquire analytical skills and complete a project (12 hours), and one final week with project presentations and a class on the future and challenges of PH surveillance (5 hours). Please see the PDF file below for the schedule details.

Prerequisite: EPIB 603 & EPIB 621 or permission of the instructor.

Academic Credits: 3

PPHS 617 Impact Evaluation

sam.harper [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. S. Harper) | Arijit.Nandi [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Nandi)

This course will cover methods for estimating the effects of social interventions on health outcomes. We will provide the intuition for conducting impact evaluation studies in population health and discuss recent developments. We will define causal policy effects within the potential outcomes framework and introduce and formally define policy-relevant research questions based on specific causal contrasts. We will cover the use of randomized and cluster randomized trials for impact evaluation, including cost-effectiveness. We will additionally cover quasi-experimental designs such as interrupted time series, difference-in-differences, instrumental variables, and regression discontinuity.

Prerequisites: EPIB 603 and EPIB 621, or permission of the instructors.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 618 Program planning and evaluation of public health programs

christine.stich [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. C. Stich)

Major activities in planning and evaluating an evidence-based public health intervention using a structured approach to intervention planning and different evaluation methodologies and techniques. Emphasis on evidence-based program planning, logic model development, participatory approaches, and program evaluation in applied public health settings.

Restrictions: Not open to students who have taken PPHS 684 when topic was "Program planning and evaluation of public health programs".

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 682 Critical Perspectives on Global Health
(Special Topics Course)

alissa.koski [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. A. Koski) | nicholas.king [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. N. King)

This course will critically examine global health research, interventions, and policies, using materials from a variety of disciplines and multiple perspectives, including voices from the global south. We will take a case-study approach, illuminating larger critiques with examples based on actual global health interventions.

Course sessions will combine lectures and group discussions. The course is designed to strengthen skills in developing and defending critically-informed arguments. Strong performance in the course will require students to actively share their thoughts with the class and respectfully respond to others’ thoughts. A substantial amount of reading is required.

Academic Credit: 2

PPHS 683 Vaccine Epidemiology
(Special Topics Course)

nicole.basta [at] mcgill.ca (Dr. N. Basta)

Vaccines are one of the most successful public health interventions ever developed. From the eradication of smallpox worldwide to ongoing efforts to eradicate polio to the development of fast-tracked Ebola vaccines, vaccination as a key public health intervention has taken center stage in the field of infectious diseases because of the impact vaccination programs have had on saving lives, preventing disease, and preserving health. However, despite the successes, challenges to designing, evaluating, delivering, and maintaining trust in vaccines persist worldwide. Vaccine epidemiology is a subfield of infectious disease epidemiology that employs core epidemiologic methods and study designs to advance our understanding of both the individual- and population-level impact of vaccines from a public health and population health perspective.

In this course, students will master critical concepts in vaccinology and utilize tools and methods from epidemiology, infectious diseases, and public health to: 1) understand principles of infectious disease transmission dynamics that determine how and why vaccines reduce the burden of disease, 2) learn about study designs that can assess both individual-level vaccine efficacy/effectiveness and evaluate the population-level impacts of vaccination programs, and 3) gain insight into the development and implementation of strategies to achieve and maintain high vaccine coverage and reduce vaccine hesitancy in diverse communities across the globe. The course will consist of a mixture of lectures, readings from the primary literature, case studies, group discussions, and in-class and take-home exercises.

Prerequisites: One graduate course in Epidemiology and one graduate course in Biostatistics or permission of the course instructor.

Academic Credit: 3

PPHS 684 Foundations of Health Promotion
(Special Topics Course)

ananya.banerjee [at] utoronto.ca (Dr. A. Banerjee)

Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over and to improve their health and its determinants (Ottawa Charter, WHO 1986; Bangkok Charter, WHO 2005). This course introduces the foundations of health promotion theory, concepts, history, strategies, and practice skills. Within the course, health is defined broadly, and the promotion of health is examined at individual, interpersonal, community and societal levels. The course reflects a critical, socio-ecological approach to health and health promotion, recognizing that health is influenced by a complex interplay of biological and social factors.

Prerequisites: PPHS 612 or permission of the course instructor.

Academic Credit: 3

 

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