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Welcome to the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill

The Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill (Cundill Prize), coordinated by the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada (MISC) on behalf of the Dean of Arts, was established in 2008 to be offered each year by McGill University (Montreal, Canada) to an individual, of any nationality and from any country, who has published a book determined to have had (or likely to have) a profound literary, social and academic impact in the area of history. Read more about the Prize.


BOOK PRIZE ANNOUNCEMENT

It is with great pleasure that we announce that book submissions (published between June 1, 2013 to May 31, 2014) for the seventh annual Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill University will be accepted from April 1, 2014 to May 31, 2014. The Prize will grant one Grand Prize of US$75,000 and two 'Recognition of Excellence' Prizes of US$10,000.

The Cundill Prize will be awarded each year by McGill University to an individual who has published a book written in English (or translated to English), determined to have had (or likely to have) a profound literary, social and academic impact in the area of history.

Publishers are invited once again, in addition to hard copy books, to submit an e-version of the book for the jury members’ convenience. 

To see the rules2014 Cundill Prize Rules

To complete the registration form: 2014 Registration form


 

2013 Cundill Prize Award Ceremony

  • To view photos (Ryan Emberley, Photographer), please click here.

  • To view the video (Ian Morris, Videographer), please click here. (password: mcgill)


 The grand prize winner for the 2013 Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill will be announced on November 20th at 10pm. Please click here, for more information.


Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill:

The National Post is posting excerpts from all six 2013 Cundill Prize finalists. (The top three in this photo are on the shortlist). On the evening of November 20th, the University will grant one Grand Prize of US$75,000 and two 'Recognition of Excellence' Prizes of $10,000 each. http://bit.ly/185N2rY


 

 Christopher Manfredi, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Administrative Chair of the Cundill Prize Jury, is pleased to announce the Cundill Prize Finalists for 2013 - Press Release

Anne Applebaum--- Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe 1944-1956 (Allen Lane - Penguin Books / McClelland & Stewart)

Biography:

ANNE APPLEBAUM is a historian and journalist, a regular columnist for the Washington Post and Slate, and the author of several books, including Gulag: A History, which won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for non-fiction. She is the Director of Political Studies at the Legatum Institute in London, and she divides her time between Britain and Poland, where her husband, Radek Sikorski, serves as Foreign Minister.

Book Summary: At the end of the Second World War, the Soviet Union unexpectedly found itself in control of a huge swath of territory in Eastern Europe. Stalin and his secret police set out to convert a dozen radically different countries to a completely new political and moral system: communism. In Iron Curtain, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Anne Applebaum describes how the Communist regimes of Eastern Europe were created and what daily life was like once they were complete.

McGill Reporter, (November 4, 2013)
Four Burning Questions for Anne Applebaum, 2013 Cundill Prize Finalist


Christopher Clark--- The Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went To War In 1914 (HarperCollins / Allen Lane - Penguin Books)

Biography:

Christopher Clark is a professor of modern European history and a fellow of St. Catharine's College at the University of Cambridge, UK. He is the author of Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600-1947, among other books.

Book Summary: On the morning of June 28, 1914, when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie Chotek arrived at Sarajevo Railway Station, Europe was at peace.  Thirty-seven days later, it was at war. The conflict that resulted would kill over twenty million people, destroy three empires, and permanently alter world history. The Sleepwalkers reveals in gripping detail how this crisis unfolded.

McGill Reporter, (November 15, 2013)
Four Burning Questions for Christopher Clark, finalist for the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature


Fredrik Logevall---Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America's Vietnam (Random House)

Biography: Fredrik Logevall is John S. Knight Professor of International Studies and professor of history at Cornell University, where he serves as director of the Mario Einaudi Center for International Studies.

Book Summary: A groundbreaking history of America's four-decade-long road to war in Vietnam. This monumental history asks the simple question: How did we end up in a war in Vietnam? To answer that question Fredrik Logevall traces the forty-year path that led us from World War I to the first American casualties in 1959.

McGill Reporter, (November 12, 2013)
Four Burning Questions for Fredrik Logevall, finalist for the Cundill Prize in Historical Literature


 

Christopher Manfredi, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Administrative Chair of the Cundill Prize Jury, is pleased to announce the Cundill Prize Short List for 2013

 Press Release is available here

 

SIX SHORTLISTED BOOKS

TWO HONOURABLE MENTIONS

 


UPCOMING CUNDILL EVENTS: 

October 21 – 2013 Cundill Lecture, From 2012 Cundill Prize Winner Stephen Platt  
Photograph by Michael Lionstar, for Maisonneuve magazine

"Imperial Eclipse: The Long Road to the First Anglo-Chinese War"

The Opium War, or First Anglo-Chinese War, of 1839-1842 has long served historians as the chosen starting point for China’s modern history, the launching point of its “century of humiliation” from which successive governments have promised redemption. But such treatment sets the war in stone, as if  China’s military weakness and Britain’s predatory aggression in Canton were eternal and unchanging facts. If, instead, we view the Opium War not as a starting-point but as an ending, as the culmination of global forces decades in the    making, we can find that a different sort of story emerges. This lecture will trace a broad sweep of the history of China and its foreign    contacts, from the 1790s to the 1830s, to plot the Qing dynasty’s struggle against growing internal threats to its control – massive sectarian uprisings and bureaucratic corruption chief among them – against Britain’s rising naval power and the shifting nature of foreign trade at Canton. Such a perspective will help us to escape the illusion of the war’s inevitability and explore instead how the Qing dynasty – which began this period as one of the most powerful and admired empires in the world – came to be sufficiently weakened (and  Britain sufficiently emboldened) that such a lopsided war, widely condemned at the time as immoral, could have been fought in the first place. The names of this year’s shortlisted Cundill nominees will also be announced at the lecture. 

Cocktail to follow.  McGill Faculty Club, 3450 McTavish, 5 p.m.

RSVP: misc [dot] iecm [at] mcgill [dot] ca, or (514) 398-8346

For more information on the Cundill Prize, click here.


Cundill Prize logo

November 20 – The Cundill Prize Awards Ceremony will be held at a private event in Toronto. The $75,000 international prize for historical literature is one of the largest literary prizes in the world, made possible by the generosity of the late Peter Cundill. Previous winners include Diarmaid MacCulloch, Lisa Jardine, and Sergio Luzzatto. “Every year, it is an honour and a privilege for the Institute to organize this event, which is truly amongst the most important in our year,” says Straw. “I am confident that this year’s winning book will be every bit as fascinating as previous Cundill winners.” In addition to the $75,000 grand prize, two $10,000 “Recognition of Excellence” will be awarded. This event is one of the few invitation-only events organized by the MISC each year.

For more information on the Cundill Prize, click here.

 


CALL FOR 2013 CUNDILL SUBMISSIONS

 

March 11, 2013

 

ANNOUNCEMENT:  It is with great pleasure that we announce that book submissions for the sixth annual Cundill Prize in History at McGill University will be accepted from April 1, 2013 to May 31, 2013. The University will grant one Grand Prize of US$75,000 and two 'Recognition of Excellence' Prizes of US$10,000.

Publishers are invited once again, in addition to submitting hard copy books, to also submit an e-version of the book for the jury members’ convenience. 

Find more about the Prize rules here.

The Online Submission Form can be found here.


 Previous Grand Prize Winners

Stephen Platt (2012)

 

Sergio Luzzatto (2011)

Diarmaid MacCulloch (2010)

Lisa Jardine (2009)

 

Stewart Schwartz (2008)