songbirds

Do songbirds and humans have common biological hardwiring that shapes how they produce and perceive sounds?

Scientists who study birdsong have been intrigued for some time by the possibility that human speech and music may be rooted in biological processes shared across a variety of animals. Now, research by McGill University biologists provides new evidence to support this idea.

Classified as: songbirds, birdsong, speech, sounds, finches, Universal, grammar, learning, jon sakata, Logan James, Biology, neurobiological, society and culture
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Published on: 22 Nov 2017

McGill Newsroom

The research has implications for understanding human developmental disorders such as autism

Adult songbirds modify their vocalizations when singing to juveniles in the same way that humans alter their speech when talking to babies. The resulting brain activity in young birds could shed light on speech learning and certain developmental disorders in humans, according to a study by McGill University researchers.

Classified as: autism, songbirds, birds, science and technology, developmental disorders, neurobiology, jon sakata
Published on: 31 May 2016