Quick Links

science news

Scientists Are Building VR Worlds for Mice and Monkeys

Researchers now have the capability to build virtual reality worlds that can be inhabited by both lab animals (like rats and monkeys) and humans, allowing for a sort of cross-species brain research that’s never really been possible before, as different species are run through virtual environments in video games while scientists study brain activity… In a new study, published in Journal of Neuroscience Methods, a team of neuroscientists—including Martinez-Trujillo, Roberto Gulli and Guillaume Doucet, who are both also affiliated with McGill University—describe a new virtual reality “toolbox”

Category :
Published on : 13 May 2016

Making Better Use of Science and Technology in Policy-Making

As governments struggle to keep pace with rapid advancements in science and technology, a new report by the Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP) and the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE) outlines how governments can better incorporate that knowledge in policy-making processes and improve the quality of government decisions.

Published on : 23 Mar 2016

Building living, breathing supercomputers

By Katherine Gombay, McGill Newsroom The substance that provides energy to all the cells in our bodies, Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers.

Published on : 26 Feb 2016

Could black phosphorus be the next silicon?

As scientists continue to hunt for a material that will make it possible to pack more transistors on a chip, new research from McGill University and Université de Montréal adds to evidence that black phosphorus could emerge as a strong candidate.

Published on : 07 Jul 2015

Honey, I shrunk the ants: how environment controls size

Until now scientists have believed that the variations in traits such as our height, skin colour, tendency to gain weight or not, intelligence, tendency to develop certain diseases, etc., all of them traits that exist along a continuum, were a result of both genetic and environmental factors. But they didn’t know how exactly these things worked together. By studying ants, McGill researchers have identified a key mechanism by which environmental (or epigenetic) factors influence the expression of all of these traits, (along with many more).

Category :
Published on : 11 Mar 2015