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McGill University news

McGill only Quebec university to make top 100 in world rankings

McGill University is the only Quebec university to make the top 100 in the 2015-16 Times Higher Education World University Rankings. McGill was ranked 38th overall out of the 800 universities ranked worldwide, placing one rank better than it did last year. Université de Montréal was ranked 113th, Université de Laval was in the low 200s, and both Concordia University and Université du Québec à Montréal were ranked in the 400s. Université de Sherbrooke ranked in the 500s.

Published on : 02 Oct 2015

25 Canadian universities make World University Ranking list

Twenty-five Canadian universities have been ranked in the top 800 worldwide by Times Higher Education. The University of Toronto (19), University of British Columbia (34) and McGill University (38) are once again the top three Canadian institutions in the annual World University Ranking.  Read full article: CTV News, September 30, 2015

Published on : 02 Oct 2015

Universities participation vital to QI’s success

What can we do to revitalize our neighborhoods while propelling Montreal forward as an international hub of innovation?

Published on : 18 Sep 2015

Students say university rankings really do matter

It may not be the comeback story of the century, but McGill University’s resurgence to the No. 1 position in the latest QS World University Rankings has offered a glimmer of hope when many had predicted nothing but a continual slide down the international rankings scale for the “Harvard of the north.”

Published on : 16 Sep 2015

McGill top Canadian university according to new international rankings

McGill University maintained its position as the top-ranked Canadian university in the world even if it dropped down a few notches in the overall standings released in this year’s QS World University Rankings. Read full article: Montreal Gazette, September 15, 2015

Published on : 15 Sep 2015

Association between low vitamin D and MS

Low levels of vitamin D significantly increase the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study led by Dr. Brent Richards of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, and published in PLOS Medicine. This finding, the result of a sophisticated Mendelian randomization analysis, confirms a long-standing hypothesis that low vitamin D is strongly associated with an increased susceptibility to MS. This connection is independent of other factors associated with low vitamin D levels, such as obesity.

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Published on : 25 Aug 2015

Montreal Is The Best Student City In Canada, Says QS Top Universities

Choosing a post-secondary school is one of life's most important decisions. But Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) Top Universities is making the choice a little easier for anyone who's considered studying in Montreal. 

Published on : 20 Aug 2015

Scientists identify key gene associated with addiction

A new study published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry by a team led by Salah El Mestikawy, Ph.D., researcher at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute (CIUSSS de l’Ouest-de-l’île-de-Montréal), professor at McGill University and head of research at CNRS INSERM UPMC in Paris, opens the field to new understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying addiction in humans.

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Published on : 04 Aug 2015

Study sheds light on the causes of cerebral palsy

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most common cause of physical disability in children. Every year 140 children are diagnosed with cerebral palsy in Quebec.

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Published on : 03 Aug 2015

Practice doesn’t always make perfect

How do you get to Carnegie Hall? New research on the brain’s capacity to learn suggests there’s more to it than the adage that “practise makes perfect.” A music-training study by scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital -The Neuro, at McGill University and colleagues in Germany found evidence to distinguish the parts of the brain that account for individual talent from the parts that are activated through training.

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Published on : 28 Jul 2015

Cosmos, Joe Schwarcz Win Skeptics’ Critical Thinking Prize

  The 2014 Balles Prize in Critical Thinking, an award for excellence in the promotion of science and reason, was given this year to the creators, producers, and writers of Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, and to Dr. Joe Schwarcz for his book Is That a Fact? The Balles Prize is given annually by the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry (CSI), publisher of the magazine Skeptical Inquirer.

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Published on : 09 Jul 2015

Is phthalate alternative really safe?

A commonly used  plasticizer known as DINCH, which is found in products that come into close contact with humans, such as medical devices, children's toys and food packaging, might not be as safe as initially thought. According to a new study from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal, DINCH exerts biological effects on metabolic processes in mammals.

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Published on : 17 Jun 2015

New Segal Family Chair in Molecular Oncology

Last night, Dr. Christoph Borchers was formally installed as the inaugural appointment to the Segal Family Chair in Molecular Oncology at McGill University. He will carry out his research on clinical proteomics at the Segal Cancer Centre at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH). By recruiting Dr. Borchers, who continues to serve as Director of the University of Victoria (UVic) – Genome BC Proteomics Centre, the JGH and McGill become a central hub for the first pan-Canadian proteomics program.

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Published on : 16 Jun 2015

Impact of video gaming on the brain

A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B by the teams of Dr. Gregory West (Assistant Professor at the Université de Montréal) and Dr. Véronique Bohbot (Douglas Institute researcher and associate Professor at McGill University and the Douglas Research Institute of the CIUSSS de l’Ouest-de-l’Île de Montréal) shows that while video game players (VGPs) exhibit more efficient visual attention abilities, they are also much more likely to use navigation strategies that rely on the brain’s reward system (the caudate nucleus) and not the brain’s spatial memory system (the hippocampus). Past research has shown that people who use caudate nucleus-dependent navigation strategies have decreased grey matter and lower functional brain activity in the hippocampus. 

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Published on : 20 May 2015