Matissa Hollister

Over 30 academics from North America and Europe recently gathered at the Society and Organizations Center (SnO) in Paris for the first edition of the HEC Paris Inequality Research Conference.

The talks hit on subjects like why diversity efforts at most organizations fail and how to fix the issue, the differences in advancement speed between women and men, female tokenism at the board level, and how mental health issues can affect wages.

Classified as: Matissa Hollister, Organizational Behaviour
Published on: 15 Jun 2017

Experts keep saying that median job tenure has been in free fall for years; that switching careers and jobs is just the new reality. But the facts don’t necessarily support that position. It’s a more nuanced field than most people realise, and some segments are actually seeing less movement than before.

Classified as: Organizational Behaviour, Matissa Hollister
Published on: 5 May 2017

On a recent Breakfast Television youth employment panel, Desautels Assistant Professor Matissa Hollister said that, though it’s not necessarily an employment guarantee, “on average, it’s very clear that the university degree is the smarter, the better way to go.” But even so, the world has changed, and a degree by itself just isn’t enough. First, there’s the perennial chicken-and-egg issue, where it takes a job to get the experience required to get a job.

Classified as: Organizational Behaviour, Matissa Hollister
Published on: 28 Mar 2017

The long debate over whether America has gotten more economically unequal in the last few decades is over; all but the most recalcitrant acknowledge it. (As a recent New York Times story reported, sharp-eyed salesmen have acted on this reality, increasingly marketing to the top few percent.) The economic argument has now shifted to whether average Americans have nonetheless done alright even as the rich have become super-rich. Here one detects a subtle difference in vocabulary. Defenders of the broadening inequality insist that average family incomes have been nonetheless increasing.

Classified as: Matissa Hollister
Published on: 12 Feb 2014

Have American jobs become less stable? Do workers change employers more frequently than in the past?

Many Americans would probably say the answer to these questions is an obvious yes. Yet, for the past few decades researchers looking at the data haven’t been so sure: average job tenure (the number of years working for the same employer) has been surprisingly stable over time.

Classified as: Matissa Hollister
Category:
Published on: 6 Feb 2014

Have American jobs become less stable? Do workers change employers more frequently than in the past?

Classified as: Desautels Faculty of Management, Employment, Matissa Hollister, American Sociological Review, job tenure
Category:
Published on: 5 Feb 2014

Authors: Hollister, Matissa N.; Kristin E. Smith

Publication: American Sociological Review (Forthcoming)

Abstract:

Classified as: Organizational Behaviour, Matissa Hollister
Category:
Published on: 3 Dec 2013