News releases

A new athletic financial award -- known as the Jean Béliveau Award -- has been established at McGill University to recognize outstanding student-athletes and honour the memory of the legendary Montreal Canadiens captain and inspirational community leader.

Classified as: Athletics, Awards, award, jean béliveau, Jean Béliveau Award, marc gélinas
Published on: 23 Nov 2016

The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) today awarded its 2016 Gold Medal to Prof. Claudia Mitchell of McGill’s Department of Integrated Studies in Education, in recognition of her work to strengthen HIV/AIDS education and prevention. 

Classified as: education, SSHRC, Suzanne Fortier, claudia mitchell, Gold Medal, HIV/AIDS
Published on: 22 Nov 2016

Source: McGill Reporter staff

(UPDATED: 6:30 PM NOV. 22)

Classified as: mechanical engineering, Department of Biology, Rhodes Scholarships
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Published on: 22 Nov 2016

The first large-scale study of its kind has revealed that Canadian men generally lack knowledge about the risk factors contributing to male infertility. Research led by Dr. Phyllis Zelkowitz, head of psychosocial research at the Lady Davis Institute of the Jewish General Hospital, found that men could only identify about 50% of the potential risks and medical conditions that are detrimental to their sperm count and, thus, their prospects to father children.

Classified as: External, health and lifestyle, McGill Department of Psychiatry, Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital, Male fertility
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Published on: 22 Nov 2016

The winner of the 2016 Cundill Prize in Historical Literature at McGill was announced tonight at a gala awards dinner held in Toronto. Now in its ninth year, the Cundill Prize is one of the world’s most lucrative international awards for a nonfiction book. The Work of the Dead/ The Invention of Science/ The Invention of Nature took home the top prize of US$75,000.

Classified as: Cundill Prize in Historical Literature, society and culture
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Published on: 18 Nov 2016

One of the great mysteries in biology is how the many different cell types that make up our bodies are derived from a single cell and from one DNA sequence, or genome. We have learned a lot from studying the human genome, but have only partially unveiled the processes underlying cell determination. The identity of each cell type is largely defined by an instructive layer of molecular annotations on top of the genome – the epigenome – which acts as a blueprint unique to each cell type and developmental stage.

Classified as: Biology, epigenetics, Guillaume Bourque, Genome Québec, epigenome, health and lifestyle, immune cells, Department of Human Genetics, Tomi Pastinen, Yann Joly
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Published on: 17 Nov 2016

The transition from being sea creatures to living on land, even if it happened over 300 million years ago, seems to have left its traces on the way we keep our balance today.

“It’s a discovery that is likely to be controversial,” says Kathy Cullen, the senior researcher on a paper on the subject that was published recently in Nature Communications. She has been working on this problem for over a decade with her colleague Maurice Chacron who also teaches in McGill’s Department of Physiology.

Classified as: evolution, Faculty of Science, balance, neurons, Kathleen Cullen, Department of Physiology, maurice chacron
Published on: 11 Nov 2016

To  what extent are the world’s rivers protected?  

In 2010, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), an international treaty for the conservation of biodiversity, set a 17% target for the protection of ‘inland waters,’ including rivers. But there was a problem: there was no good way to measure progress toward that target.  

Classified as: conservation, biodiversity, Lehner, Nature Conservancy, rivers, food and sustainability, protection, Convention on Biological Diversity, freshwater, Abell
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Published on: 10 Nov 2016

By Katherine Gombay
Some potentially good news for aging Baby Boomers: researchers believe that they have developed a hip replacement that will last longer and create fewer problems for the people who receive them than those currently in use. The secret? An implant that “tricks” the host bone into remaining alive by mimicking the varying porosity of real bones.

Interestingly, the key factor that distinguishes the new implant is that is LESS rather than more solid than those in current use, while still being just as strong.

Classified as: engineering, technology, Faculty of Engineering, science and technology, Hip replacement
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Published on: 2 Nov 2016

Institut nordique du Québec (INQ)’s founding partners have unveiled the first foundational elements of the Institute’s scientific program by simultaneously announcing three northern research chairs and introducing its newly recruited director of science and innovation, Louis Fortier. 

Representatives from INQ’s three founding universities made a joint announcement of funding for three research chairs supported by INQ, allocated to INRS, McGill University, and Université Laval—a historic first for northern research.

Classified as: climate change, Institut nordique du Québec, Murray Humphries
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Published on: 1 Nov 2016

Scientists have identified a gene in the French-Canadian population that predisposes them to the development of intracranial aneurysm (IA), a potentially life threatening neurological condition that is responsible for approximately 500,000 deaths worldwide per year, half of which occur in people less than 50 years of age.

Using genetic analysis, the team of researchers found rare variations of one gene, RNF213, that appeared more frequently in IA patients than in the control group. Both patients and the control group came from French-Canadian families. 

Classified as: science, genetic, health and lifestyle, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro)
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Published on: 31 Oct 2016

To the naked eye, ancient rocks may look completely inhospitable, but in reality, they can sustain an entire ecosystem of microbial communities in their fracture waters isolated from sunlight for millions, if not billions, of years. New scientific findings discovered the essential energy source to sustain the life kilometres below Earth’s surface with implications for life not only on our planet but also on Mars. 

Classified as: science, External, science and technology, Lyle White, sulfur
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Published on: 27 Oct 2016

McGill once again ranked first in the “medical-doctoral” category in scholarships and bursaries for students, as well as in social sciences and humanities grants relative to faculty size. Maclean’s published the results online Wednesday evening.

“Our leading position in scholarships and bursaries in this ranking underscores our commitment to ensuring accessibility to education for all talented students, regardless of their financial means,” said Principal Suzanne Fortier.

Classified as: rankings, maclean's magazine
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Published on: 26 Oct 2016

Each year, about 500,000 North Americans get dental implants. If you are one of them, and are preparing to have an implant, it might be a good idea to start taking beta blockers, medication that controls high blood pressure, for a while. And to stop taking heartburn pills.

A body of research from McGill led-teams indicates that in order to raise the odds that dental implants will attach properly, there are clear benefits to taking certain common medications and avoiding others.

Bone cell growth, healing and death

Classified as: medicine, science, dental implants, Faculty of Dentistry
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Published on: 25 Oct 2016

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